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Honey To Heal Pressure Sores




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#1 Ratticis

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 07:04 AM

Back about a year ago when I was still trapped in the hospital with huge pressure ulcers on both my coxox and heels, my doctor decided to try something. Honey. You know, that stuff that tastes good on toast and comes out of a bees backside. While, it worked good on my backside too. When nothing else seemed to work, he got a woundvac on there, and once it healed enough that they could take that off, It was honey soaked dressings. It worked beautifully, although a certian plastic surgeon in the city (Edmonton) told me that I'm full of shit and I'm making stuff up when I told him that's what they had been using. That's when my doc told him "f*@k off and stay away from my patient". Anyways, when I was in the hospital it was honey, and now I'm home!
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#2 edlee

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 04:54 AM

You aren't the first I've heard that from ( or from whom I've heard that).

It is the first time I've heard that a doctor prescribed it. It has been used as an ointment for wounds from the time of Hippocrates, tho it fell into disuse about the same time that germs were discovered.

Maybe I'll give it a shot, next time I need healing.
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#3 SCOTIE

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 06:44 PM

My son had MRSA both in his superpubic site and in his throat, hospital said we would never get rid of it in his throat. one week on Manuka honey on both the site and throat and he is now MRSA clear.

#4 twisted_ophelia

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Posted 06 July 2009 - 06:02 PM

I've been told by doctors and vets (yes, vets! I own a horse and they cut themselves up a LOT in the summer) that UNPASTEURIZED honey is an incredible healer. My family doctor, who is this wonderful man from Israel, has recommended putting honey on any pressure sores I've gotten over the years and my horse's vet swears by it. I have been putting unpasteurized honey on my horse's deep cuts and scrapes and they ALWAYS heal up nicely with no infection--and I don't have to give him antibiotics for possible infection with the honey. But apparently it has to be unpasteurized. The stuff you buy in the grocery store won't work. I have always bought it from a local beekeeper. On the other hand, I've also heard doctors say that you shouldn't put ANYTHING on pressure sores, just a wound dressing if neccessary. Conflicting opinions, as always.

However, in my opinion, the best cure for pressure sores and skin breakdown? Staying off it. No matter what you put on it, if you don't stay off it as much as possible, it's not going to heal and could get worse. You really can't be too careful with pressure sores. They can get nasty before you know it and no one wants to be stuck on weeks of bed rest.
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#5 Nginoe

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 04:04 PM

I work for a company that works with natural remedies so I spend A LOT of time researching homeopathic remedies. (everything from pressure sores to UTI's to Hot Flashes to incontinence). It doesn't surprise me that honey is working on your pressure sores. Honey and Cinnamon can be prescribed for just about ANYTHING that ails you. Here is a copy of a website page on uses of Honey and Cinnamon. (Typically locally grown honey will be the best because it tends to be less processed--your local health food or herbal stores should carry locally grown honey) It's amazing when you research the healing abilities found in nature...

Facts on honey and cinnamon:

It is found that mixture of Honey and Cinnamon cures most of the diseases. Honey is produced in most of the countries of the world.

Ayurvedic as well as Yunani medicine have been using honey as a vital medicine for centuries.

Scientists of today also accept honey as a "Ram Ban" (very effective) medicine for all kinds of diseases. Honey can be used without any side effects for any kind of diseases.

Today's science says that even though honey is sweet, if taken in the right dosage as a medicine, it does not harm diabetic patients.

Weekly World News, a magazine in Canada, on its issue dated 17 January, 1995 has given the following list of diseases that can be cured by Honey and Cinnamon as researched by western scientists.

HEART DISEASES: Make a paste of honey and cinnamon powder, apply on bread, chappati, or other bread, instead of jelly and jam and eat it regularly for breakfast. It reduces the cholesterol in the arteries and saves the patient from heart attack. Also those who already had an attack, if they do this process daily, they are kept miles away from the next attack.

Regular use of the above process relieves loss of breath and strengthens the heartbeat. In America and Canada, various nursing homes have treated patients successfully and have found that as age the arteries and veins lose their flexibility and get clogged; honey and cinnamon revitalizes the arteries and veins.

INSECT BITES: Take one part honey to two parts of lukewarm water and add a small teaspoon of cinnamon powder, make a paste and massage it on the itching part of the body slowly. It is noticed that the pain recedes within a minute or two.

ARTHRITIS: Arthritis patients may take daily, morning and night, one cup of hot water with two spoons of honey and one small teaspoon of cinnamon powder. If taken regularly even chronic arthritis can be cured.

In a recent research conducted at the Copenhagen University, it was found that when the doctors treated their patients with a mixture of one tablespoon Honey and half teaspoon Cinnamon powder before breakfast, they found that within a week out of the 200 people so treated practically 73 patients were totally relieved of pain and within a month, mostly all the patients who could not walk or move around because of arthritis started walking without pain.

HAIR LOSS: Those suffering from hair loss or baldness, may apply a paste of hot olive oil, one tablespoon of honey, one teaspoon of cinnamon powder before bath and keep it for approx. 15 min. and then wash the hair. It was found to be effective even if kept on for 5 minutes.

BLADDER INFECTIONS: Take two tablespoons of cinnamon powder and one teaspoon of honey in a glass of lukewarm water and drink it. It destroys the germs in the bladder.

TOOTHACHE: Make a paste of one teaspoon of cinnamon powder and five teaspoons of honey and apply on the aching tooth. This may be applied 3 times a day till the tooth stops aching.

CHOLESTEROL: Two tablespoons of honey and three teaspoons of Cinnamon Powder mixed in 16 ounces of tea water, given to a cholesterol patient, was found to reduce the level of cholesterol in the blood by 10% within 2 hours. As mentioned for arthritic patients, if taken 3 times a day, any Chronic cholesterol is cured. As per information received in the said journal, pure honey taken with food daily relieves complaints of cholesterol.

COLDS: Those suffering from common or severe colds should take one tablespoon lukewarm honey with 1/4 spoon cinnamon powder daily for 3 days. This process will cure most chronic cough, cold and clear the sinuses.

INFERTILITY: Yunani and Ayurvedic Medicine have been using honey for thousands of years to strengthen the semen of men. If impotent men regularly take two tablespoon of honey before going to sleep, their problem will be solved.

In China, Japan and Far-East countries, women, who do not conceive and need to strengthen the uterus, have been taking cinnamon powder for centuries. Women who cannot conceive may take a pinch of cinnamon powder in half teaspoon of honey and apply it on the gums frequently throughout the day, so that it slowly mixes with the saliva and enters the body.

A couple in Maryland, USA, had no children for 14 years and had lost hope of having a child of their own. When told about this process, husband and wife started taking honey and cinnamon as stated above; the wife conceived after a few months and had twins at full term.

UPSET STOMACH: Honey taken with cinnamon powder cures stomachache and also clears stomach ulcers from the root.

GAS: According to the studies done in India & Japan, it is revealed that if honey is taken with cinnamon powder the stomach is relieved of gas.

IMMUNE SYSTEM: Daily use of honey and cinnamon powder strengthens the immune system and protects the body from bacteria and viral attacks. Scientists have found that honey has various vitamins and iron in large amounts. Constant use of honey strengthens the white blood corpuscles to fight bacteria and viral diseases.

INDIGESTION: Cinnamon powder sprinkled on two tablespoons of honey taken before food, relieves acidity and digests the heaviest of meals.

INFLUENZA: A scientist in Spain has proved that honey contains a natural ingredient, which kills the influenza germs and saves the patient from flu.

LONGEVITY: Tea made with honey and cinnamon powder, when taken regularly arrests the ravages of old age. Take 4 spoons of honey, 1 spoon of cinnamon powder and 3 cups of water and boil to make like tea. Drink 1/4 cup, 3 to 4 times a day. It keeps the skin fresh and soft and arrests old age.

Life spans also increases and even a 100 year old, starts performing the chores of a 20-year-old.

PIMPLES: Three tablespoons of Honey and one teaspoon of cinnamon powder paste. Apply this paste on the pimples before sleeping and wash it next morning with warm water. If done daily for two weeks, it removes pimples from the root.

SKIN INFECTIONS: Applying honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts on the affected parts cures eczema, ringworm and all types of skin infections.

WEIGHT LOSS: Daily in the morning 1/2 hour before breakfast on an empty stomach and at night before sleeping, drink honey and cinnamon powder boiled in one-cup water. If taken regularly it reduces the weight of even the most obese person.

Also, drinking of this mixture regularly does not allow the fat to accumulate in the body even though the person may eat a high calorie diet.

CANCER: Recent research in Japan and Australia has revealed that advanced cancer of the stomach and bones have been cured successfully. Patients suffering from these kinds of cancer should daily take one tablespoon of honey with one teaspoon of cinnamon powder for one month 3 times a day.

FATIGUE: Recent studies have shown that the sugar content of honey is more helpful rather than being detrimental to the strength of the body. Senior citizens, who take honey and cinnamon power in equal parts, are more alert and flexible.

Dr. Milton who has done research says that a half tablespoon honey taken in a glass of water and sprinkled with cinnamon powder, taken daily after brushing and in the afternoon at about 3.00 p.m. when the vitality of the body starts to decrease, increases the vitality of the body within a week.

BAD BREATH: People of South America, first thing in the morning gargle with one teaspoon of honey and cinnamon powder mixed in hot water. So their breath stays fresh throughout the day.

HEARING LOSS: Daily morning and night honey and cinnamon powder taken in equal parts restore hearing.

www.thepowerhour.com/news/honey.htm

#6 Trinity

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 06:37 PM

Have you got any references, and I mean real references, of clinical trials and studies, to back up all these claims?

I agree honey can be used to treat wounds etc in certain cases. I have seen honey help heal wounds and prevent further skin breakdown, but I find some of you claims to be a little far fetched.

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#7 greybeard

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 07:05 PM

You're not alone, Trin!!

"Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day;  Rage, rage against the dying of the light" 

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#8 Nginoe

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 07:34 PM

These aren't neccesarily "my" claims. It's an article that I found on a website (which was originally printed in Weekly World News, a magazine in Canada, on its issue dated 17 January, 1995). I know that some of it sounds pretty far-fetched and I'm not necessarily advising that someone stops chemotherapy and just starts drinking honey tea and hope they cure their cancer. I will say though that if you look through out history you will find that there are an awful lot of homeopathic and natural remedies that were once upon a time the answer to health concerns.

I have an interesting testimony on herbal remedies. I am married to a man from Sudan Africa. We had a baby a few years ago and I was having a hard time keeping up my milk production. I researched online and discovered a remedy using fenugreek seeds in a tea. I made the tea and found that it helped. Shortly after that I was at the house of one of our friends who is also from Sudan Africa and she was making a pudding that the Sudanese bring to women after they have a baby. While she was teaching me to make the pudding, I recognized an ingredient--fenugreek seed. The more and more I cook with my Sudanese friends, the more and more I am finding that the ingredients that they use in their spices are frequently known in the homeopathic world as being healing herbs and spices. My friend did not make the pudding with the fenugreek because she wanted to help her friend's breast milk come in strong--but I'm willing to bet that a long time ago in an African village a medicine woman discovered the benefits of fenugreek and they made the recipe to offset the incredibly nasty taste of the fenugreek so that women would eat it after childbirth and be able to feed their babies.

Sorry, I got sidetracked--as you can see, herbal medicine is kind of a passion for me.

I do have references that all show a wide range of benefits of using honey to heal.

Internet resources:
http://www.herbcompa...ing-Better.aspx
Article by Gina Mohammed, Ph.D.

http://www.breathing...-for-health.htm it has the same information that I posted and includes citations for clinical research.


Magazine Articles
Molan, P. C. (1985) "Selection of honey for medicinal use." New Zealand. Beekeeper 184, 29-30.

Molan, P.C. "Honey for the treatment of infections". (1992) The New Zealand Beekeeper 216, 19-20. [Re-printed in Bee Informed 3 (2) 6-9 (1996) ]

Molan, P.C. "Honey for the treatment of infections." The Beekeepers Quarterly 28: 24 (1992). (Re-printed in The Institute Journal 3 (1) 7-9 (1993) [The Institute of Health Food Retailing, U. K.] )

Molan, P. C. (1993) "Honey as an antiseptic". Open Forum for Health Information 7 (2): 27-28.

Molan, P.C. (1996) "Honey as an antimicrobial medicine." Wanganui Chronicle 11 July, p. 10

Molan, P.C. (1997) "Antiseptic honey" Canterbury Farmer June issue, p. 11

Molan, P. C. (1998) "A therapeutic evaluation of honey." Animal Options Feb-April issue, pp. 4-7.

Molan, P. C. (1998) " Establishing honey as a respectable medicine." The New Zealand Beekeeper 5 (11): 16-18.

Molan, P. C. (1999) "The use of honey for dressing animals' wounds" New Zealand Holistic Veterinarians Society Newsletter

Molan, P. C. (1999) "The use of honey in the treatment of leg ulcers." The North Coast Senior Post (Australia) 3 (7)

Molan, P. C. (2000) "Establishing honey as a recognized medicine" Bee Informed (The Journal of the American Apitherapy Society) 7 (1): 7-9.

Molan, P. C. (2000) "The value of research" New Zealand Beekeeper 7 (10): 19-21.

Molan, P. C. (2000) "Using honey on wounds" Nurse to Nurse 1 (7): 24-25.

Molan, P. C.; Betts, J. A. (2001) "Dressing wounds with honey." NZ Nursing Review March issue 19-20.

Betts, J. A.; Molan, P. C. (2001) "Honey as a wound dressing." Tissue Issue (NZ Woundcare Society) 6 (4): 3-4.

Reviews
Molan, P. C. (1998) "A brief review of the use of honey as a clinical dressing." Primary Intention (The Australian Journal of Wound Management) 6 (4): 148-158

Molan, P. C. (1999) "The role of honey in the management of wounds." Journal of Wound Care 8 (8): 423-426.

Molan, P. C. (1999) " Why honey is effective as a medicine. 1. Its use in modern medicine." Bee World 80 (2): 80-92.

Cooper, R. A. and Molan, P.C. (1999) "Honey in wound care" Journal of Wound Care 8 (7) 340.

Molan, P.C. (2000) "The unique properties of manuka honey." Advances in Wound Care http://www.woundcare...anukaletter.htm

Molan, P. C. (2000) "Selection of honey for use as a wound dressing." Primary Intention (The Australian Journal of Wound Management) 8 (3): 87-92.

Molan, P.C; Cooper, R. A. (2000) "Honey and sugar as a dressing for wounds and ulcers" Tropical Doctor 30 249-250.

Molan, P.C. (2001) "Potential of honey for the treatment of wounds and burns." American Journal of Clinical Dermatology 2 (1): 13-19. [Re-printed, with some changes, also as: "Honey for the treatment of wounds and burns." New Ethicals 4 (7) 13-23; and as "Treatment of wounds and burns with honey." Current Therapeutics 42 (9) 33-39.]

Molan, P.C. (2001) "Why honey is effective as a medicine. 2. The scientific explanation of its effects." Bee World 82 (1): 22-40.

Molan, P. C. (2001) " The potential of honey to promote oral wellness." General Dentistry 49 (6): 584-589

Papers in Journals
Wood, B.; Rademaker, M.; Molan, P. C. (1997) "Manuka honey, a low cost leg ulcer dressing." New Zealand Medical Journal 110: 107.

Dunford, C.; Cooper, R.A; Molan, P.C. (2000) "Using honey as a dressing for infected skin lesions." Nursing Times NTplus 96 (14): 7-9.

Dunford, C.; Cooper, R.A; White, R.J.; Molan, P.C. (2000) "The use of honey in wound management" Nursing Standard 15 (11): 63-68.

Molan, P. C. (2000) "Selection of honey for use as a wound dressing." Primary Intention (The Australian Journal of Wound Management) 8 (3): 87-92.

Molan, P. C.; Betts, J. A. (2000) "Using honey as a wound dressing: some practical considerations." Nursing Times 96 (49): 36-37.

Molan, P. C.; Cooper, R. A. (2000) "Honey and sugar as a dressing for wounds and ulcers." Tropical Doctors 30: 249-250.

Papers recently submitted to journals
Cooper, R. A; Molan, P. C.; Krishnamoorthy, L; Harding, K. G. (2001) "The use of honey in healing a recalcitrant surgical wound following surgical treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa." European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

"Phuapradit, W.; Molan, P. C. (2001) " Tropical application of honey in treatment of abdominal wound disruption." Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynocology

Tonks, A.; Cooper, R. A; Price, A. J.; Molan, P. C; Jones, K. P. (2001) "Honey and monocyte modulation: a possible role in wound healing." Cytokines

Molan, P. C.(2001) "Re-introducing honey in the management of wounds and ulcers - theory and practice." Ostomy/Wound Management in press

Conference Papers
Molan, P.C. (1996) "Honey as a wound dressing." - a poster paper presented at the 2nd National Wound Care Conference, Harrogate, U.K.

Molan, P.C. (1996) "Honey as a wound dressing." - a poster paper presented at the 2nd National Wound Care Conference, Harrogate, U.K.

Molan, P. C.; Brett, M. (1998) " Honey has potential as a dressing for wounds infected with MRSA." - a paper presented at the 2nd Australian Wound Management Association Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

Molan, P.C. (1999) " The medical use of honey as an antiseptic wound dressing." - a paper presented by invitation at the National Infection control Conference, Rotorua, NZ.

Molan, P.C. (1999) "Establishing honey as a recognised medicine." - a paper presented by invitation (keynote speaker) at the Apimondia Congress, Vancouver, Canada

Molan, P.C.; Betts, J. (2000) "Manuka honey in the management of venous ulceration." - a paper presented at the Vascular Conference, Hamilton, NZ.

Allen, K. L.; Hutchinson, G.; Molan, P.C. (2000) "The potential for using honey to treat wounds infected with MRSA and VRE." - a poster paper presented at the First World Congress on Wound Healing, Melbourne, Australia: 10 - 13 September 2000.

Robson, V.; Ward, R. G.; Moaln, P. C. (2000) "The use of honey in split skin grafting." - a paper presented at the European Wound Management Association Conference, Harrogate, U.K.

Molan, P.C. (2001) "Manuka honey as a medicine" - Proceedings of the Global Bioactives Summit, Hamilton, NZ . Issued on CD-ROM jointly by the New Zealand Dairy Group, Celentis and Agresearch: Hamilton, New Zealand.

Molan, P. C. (2001) " Honey for oral health."- paper presented by invitation at the American Association for Dental Research Conference in Chicago, USA. Abstract published in Journal of Dental Research 80 (Special Issue), 130.

Molan, P.C. (2001) "The potential of honey for treatment and prevention of periodontal disease." - a paper presented by invitation at the 8th International Meeting of the International Academy of Periodontology, Auckland, New Zealand.

Molan, P.C. (2001) "Honey use in wound care." - a paper presented by invitation at the State Conference of the New South Wales Wound Care Society, Woolongong, Australia.

Betts, J. A.; Molan, P. C. (2001) " A pilot trial of honey as a wound dressing has shown the importance of the way that honey is applied to wounds." - a paper presented a the European Wound Management Association Conference, Dublin, Eire.

Robson,V.; Dunford, C.; Molan, P.C.; Cooper, R.A. (2001) "The use of honey in wound management." - a paper presented at the Innovations in Wound Care Conference, Cardiff, U.K.

Betts, J.A.; Molan, P.C. (2002) " Results of a pilot trial of manuka honey as a dressing for infected chronic wounds." - a paper presented at the 4th Australian Wound Management Association Conference, Adelaide, Australia.

Theses
A. Fjällman (M.Sc.) Confectionery made from honey with high antibacterial activity for the protection of dental health. (2000)

C. Buntting (MSc) The production of hydrogen peroxide by honey and its relevance to wound healing. (2001)

Antimicrobial Properties of Honey
Magazine Articles
Molan, P. C. (1993) "Honey as an antiseptic". Open Forum for Health Information 7 (2): 27-28.

Molan, P.C. (1994) "The antibacterial properties of honey." Chem NZ No.54 18-23.

Molan, P. C. (1995) "The antibacterial properties of honey." Chemistry in New Zealand 59(4): 10-14.

Chapters in Books
Molan, P. C. (1997) "Honey as an antimicrobial agent". In: Mizrahi, A. and Lensky, Y. (eds.) Bee Products: Properties, Applications and Apitherapy Plenum Press, New York. Pages 27-37.

Reviews
Molan, P. C. (1992) "The antibacterial activity of honey. 1. The nature of the antibacterial activity." Bee World 73(1): 5-28.

Molan, P. C. (1992) "The antibacterial activity of honey. 2. Variation in the potency of the antibacterial activity." Bee World 73(2): 59-76.

Molan, P. C. (2001) "Honey as a topical antibacterial agent for treatment of infected wounds." World Wide Wounds http://www.worldwide...ical-agent.html

Papers in Journals
Molan, P. C.; Russell, K. M. (1988) "Non-peroxide antibacterial activity in some New Zealand honeys." Journal of Apicultural Research 27: 62-67.

Molan, P. C.; Smith, I. M.; Reid, G. M. (1988) "A comparison of the antibacterial activity of some New Zealand honeys." Journal of Apicultural Research 27: 252-256.

Russell, K. M.; Molan, P. C.; Wilkins, A. L.; Holland, P. T. (1988) "The identification of some antibacterial constituents of New Zealand Manuka honey." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 38: 10-13.

Allen, K. L.; Molan, P. C.; Reid, G. M. (1991) "A survey of the antibacterial activity of some New Zealand honeys." Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 43 (12): 817-822.

Allen, K. L.; Molan, P. C.; Reid, G. M. (1991) "The variability of the antibacterial activity of honey." Apiacta 26 (4): 114-121.

Willix, D. J.; Molan, P. C.; Harfoot, C. J. (1992) "A comparison of the sensitivity of wound-infecting species of bacteria to the antibacterial activity of manuka honey and other honey." Journal of Applied Bacteriology 73: 388-394.

Al Somai, N.; Coley, K. E.; Molan, P. C.; Hancock, B. M. (1994) "Susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to the antibacterial activity of manuka honey." Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 87 (1): 9-12.

Molan, P. C.; Allen, K. L. (1996) "The effect of gamma-irradiation on the antibacterial activity of honey." Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 48: 1206-1209.

Brady, N. F.; Molan, P. C.; Harfoot, C. G. (1997) "The sensitivity of dermatophytes to the antimicrobial activity of manuka honey and other honey." Pharmaceutical Sciences 2: 1-3.

Allen, K. L.; Molan, P. C. (1997) "The sensitivity of mastitis-causing bacteria to the antibacterial activity of honey." New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 40: 537-540.

Cooper, R. A.; Molan, P. C. (1999) "The use of honey as an antiseptic in managing Pseudomonas infection." Journal of Wound Care 8 (4): 161-164.

Cooper, R. A.; Molan, P. C.; Harding, K. G. (1999) "Antibacterial activity of honey against strains of Staphylococcus aureus from infected wounds." Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 92: 283-285.

Papers recently submitted to journals
Bang, L. M.; Molan, P. C. (2001) "The effect of dilution on the rate of production of hydrogen peroxide in honey."

Brady, N. F.; Molan, P. C. (2001) "Antibacterial activity of honey against enteropathogenic bacteria"

Cooper, R. A.; Halas, E.; Molan, P. C. (2001) "The efficacy of honey in inhibiting strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from infected burns."

Cooper, R. A.; Halas, E.; Davies, R.; Molan, P. C.; Harding, K. G. (2001) "Honey and gram positive cocci of clinical significance in wounds"

Conference Papers
Molan, P. C.; Allen, K. L.; Tan, S. T.; Wilkins, A. L. (1989) Identification of components responsible for the antibacterial activity of Manuka and Viper's Bugloss honeys - presented at the Annual Conference of the New Zealand Institute of Chemistry.

Molan, P.C. (1992) "Honey as an antibacterial agent" - a paper presented by invitation at the Annual Conference of the New Zealand Dieticians Association.

Allen, K.L. and Molan, P.C. (1994) "A comparison of the sensitivity of mastitis-causing bacteria to the antibacterial activity of manuka honey, artificial honey and other honey." - a poster paper presented at the annual conference of the British Beekeepers Association. [Also presented at the annual conference of the New Zealand Beekeepers Association.]

Molan, P. C.; Brett, M. (1998) " Honey has potential as a dressing for wounds infected with MRSA." - a paper presented at the 2nd Australian Wound Management Association Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

Molan, P.C. (1999) " The medical use of honey as an antiseptic wound dressing." - a paper presented by invitation at the National Infection control Conference, Rotorua, NZ.

Molan, P.C. (2000) " The use of honey as an antimicrobial agent." - a paper presented by invitation at the New Zealand Institute of medical Laboratory Science Conference, Rotorua, NZ.

Allen, K. L.; Hutchinson, G.; Molan, P.C. (2000) "The potential for using honey to treat wounds infected with MRSA and VRE." - a poster paper presented at the First World Congress on Wound Healing, Melbourne, Australia: 10 - 13 September 2000.

Cooper, R.A.; Halas, E.; Davies, R.; Molan, P.; Harding, K.G. (2000) The inhibition of Gram positive cocci of clinical importance by honey. First World Congress on Wound Healing, Melbourne, Australia: 10 - 13 September 2000.

Buntting C.M.N.; Molan, P.C. (2002) " Honey provides an effective and harmless source of hydrogen peroxide for chemokine and antibacterial roles in wound care." - a paper presented at the 4th Australian Wound Management Association Conference, Adelaide, Australia.

Theses
K.M. Russell (M.Sc.) The antibacterial properties of honey. (1983)

D.F. Sealey (M.Sc.) Chromatographic investigations of the antibacterial activity in manuka honey. (1988)

M.J. Hodgson (M.Sc.) Investigation of the antibacterial action spectrum of some honeys. (1989)

S.B. Price (M.Sc.) Isolation of antibacterial components from manuka honey. (1991)

D.J. Willix (M.Sc.Tech.) A comparitive study of the antibacterial action spectrum of manuka honey and other honey. (1992)

A. Fjällman (M.Sc.) Confectionery made from honey with high antibacterial activity for the protection of dental health. (2000)

V. Anderson (M.Sc.) Investigating the potential for using honey to treat Streptococcal throat infections. (2000)

V. French (M.Sc.) Investigating the sensitivity of medically important bacteria to the antimicrobial activity of honey. (2002)

Composition and Identification of Honey
Magazine Articles
Tan, S. T.; Wilkins, A. L.; Reid, G. M. (1986) "Floral source identification: a chemical approach." New Zealand Beekeeper 190: 21-3.

Tan, S. T.; Wilkins, A. L.; Reid, M.; Molan, P. C. (1988) "A chemical approach to the characterisation of New Zealand Ling Heather honey." New Zealand Beekeeper 199: 31-33.

Tan, S. T.; Wilkins, A. L.; Reid, G. M. (1990) A chemical procedure for the characterization of New Zealand Thyme and Willow Honeys. New Zealand Beekeeper 205, 11-12.

Molan, P. C. (1999) "The unique properties of manuka honey" Bee Informed (The Journal of the American Apitherapy Society) 6 (1): 5-6.

Chapters in Books
Molan, P. C. (1996) "Authenticity of honey". In: Ashurst, P.R. and Dennis, M.J. (eds.) Food Authentication, Blackie Academic and Professional, London pp. 259-303.

Reviews
Molan, P. C. (1998) "The limitations of the methods of identifying the floral source of honeys" Bee World 79 (2): 59-68.

Papers in Journals
Tan, S. T.; Holland, P. T.; Wilkins, A. L.; Molan, P. C. (1988) "Extractives from New Zealand honeys. 1. White clover, manuka and kanuka unifloral honeys." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 36 (3): 453-460.

Russell, K. M.; Molan, P. C.; Wilkins, A. L.; Holland, P. T. (1988) "The identification of some antibacterial constituents of New Zealand Manuka honey." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 38: 10-13.

Tan, S. T.; Wilkins, A. L.; Molan, P. C.; Holland, P. T.; Reid, M. (1989) "A chemical approach to the determination of the floral sources of New Zealand honeys." Journal of Apicultural Research 28 (4): 212-22.

Tan, S. T.; Wilkins, A. L.; Holland, P. T. (1989) "Isolation and X-ray crystal structure of a degraded carotenoid constituent of New Zealand thyme honey", Australian Journal of Chemistry, 42: 1799-1804.

Tan, S. T.; Wilkins, A. L.; Holland, P. T.; McGhie, T. K. (1989) "Extractives from New Zealand unifloral honeys. 2. Degraded carotenoids and other substances from heather honey." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 37 (5): 1217-21.

Tan, S. T.; Wilkins, A. L.; Holland, P. T.; McGhie, T. K. (1990) "Extractives from New Zealand honeys. 3. Unifloral thyme and willow honey constituents." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 38 (9): 1833-8.

Broom, S. J.; Ede, R. M.; Wilkins A. L.; Lu, Y. (1992) " Synthesis of (+/-)-E-4-(1,2,4-trihydroxy-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohexyl)-but-3-en-2-one: a novel degraded carotenoid isolated from New Zealand thyme (Thymus vulgaris) honey." Tetrahedron Letters, 1992, 33 (22): 3197-3200.

Broom, S. J.; Ede, R. M.; Wilkins A. L.; Lu, Y. (1992) "Isolation and structural characterisation of Kamahine C: an unusual spiroketal found in a native New Zealand honey." Tetrahedron Letters, 1992, 33 (41): 6201-6204.

Ede, R. M.; Wilkins A. L.; Lu, Y.; Tan, S. T. (1993) "Novel nor-sesquiterpenoids in New Zealand Honeys II. Isolation and structural characterisation of meliracemoic acid" Tetrahedron Letters 34: 6795-6798.

Wilkins, A. L.; Lu, Y.; Molan, P. C. (1993) "Extractable organic substances from New Zealand unifloral manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) honeys." Journal of Apicultural Research 32 (1): 3-9.

Wilkins, A. L.; Lu, Y.; Tan, S. T. (1993) "Extractives from New Zealand honeys. 4. Linalool derivatives and other components from nodding thistle (Carduus nutans) honey." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 41 (6): 873-878.

Wilkins, A. L.; Lu, Y.; Tan, S. T. (1995) "Extractives from New Zealand honeys. 5. Aliphatic dicarboxylic acids in New Zealand rewarewa (Knightea excelsa)) honey." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 43 (12): 3021-3025.

Wilkins, A. L.; Tan, S. T.; Molan, P. C. (1995) "Extractives from New Zealand unifloral vipers bugloss (Echium vulgare) honey." Journal of Apicultural Research 34 (2): 73-78.

Astwood, K.; Lee, B.; Manley-Harris, M. (1998) "Oligosaccharides in New Zealand honeydew honey." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 46: 4958-4962.

Papers recently submitted to journals
Bang, L. M.; Molan, P. C. (2001) "The effect of dilution on the rate of production of hydrogen peroxide in honey."

Conference Papers
Molan, P. C.; Allen, K. L.; Tan, S. T.; Wilkins, A. L. (1989) Identification of components responsible for the antibacterial activity of Manuka and Viper's Bugloss honeys - presented at the Annual Conference of the New Zealand Institute of Chemistry.

Theses
S.T. Tan (D.Phil.) A chemical investigation of some N.Z. honeys. (1989)

M.D.Valentine (M.Sc.) A chemical analysis of New Zealand ling heather honey. (1992)

L.M. Bang (M.Sc.) Development of a natural food preservative using a combination of honey and lactoperoxidase. (1998)

#9 Trinity

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 07:55 PM

Wow, thats a lot of references! I am not going to look them all up I'm afraid! They mainly seemed to be geared towards wound, wound healing, skin protection and it's anti microbial properties. As I said I have seen honey work effectively in wounds, and indeed we use a product called Medihoney where I work as a barrier cream.

The sort of thing I have issue with is statements such as these

Honey can be used without any side effects for any kind of diseases.

those who already had an attack, if they do this process daily, they are kept miles away from the next attack.

relieves loss of breath and strengthens the heartbeat

Daily morning and night honey and cinnamon powder taken in equal parts restore hearing.

In my opinion the 'cure' of such problems depends a lot on the cause and claims like those made (and I understand that they are not necessariliy your claims) could mean people stop potentially life saving medication to they detriment.

I do believe natural remedies have their place but they should be used in caution. It is also worth remembering that some natural remedies interfere with prescription drugs and due to the lack of control governing their production you can never be entirely sure on the purity of the product you are buying.

I guess what I am trying to say is exercise caution

Memento Vivere
Memento Mori


#10 CR_L1

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 08:09 PM

I’m not going dismiss any claims but do feel some are a bit over the top but hay anything is worth a try when nothing else worksmg_nurseshot.gif
I am probably depriving a village of an idiot
I use to be indecisive but Im not so sure anymore

#11 Nginoe

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 10:08 PM

I absolutely agree with everything you said Trinity.

Anything we use for medicinal purposes should be taken with caution. And of course if you are taking medications you should always check to make sure that the medications you take and the natural remedies you take do not cause side effects with each other.

Like I said, I'm not encouraging anyone to fire their doctor and start keeping bees in the backyard. I just saw that some people had posted about using honey for wound care and I remembered I had this information saved away. I do a lot of research on all-natural remedies and as a result I am a fountain of strange facts of how foods and herbs can effect your body...

#12 E-DOG

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:16 PM

The type of steel used in the making of the Golden Gate Bridge was found to be unacceptable for rivets and welding. Having already purchased the steel by credit card and therefore unable to get it returned (you know how home depot can be) they had to make do with what they had.

Some one had read in an old farmers almanac somewhere that a mixture of honey and cinnamon, mixed with just a little parrot feces will in fact make a terrific adhesive in a pinch.

The engineers, along with a couple of shyster San Fransisco lawyers pondered the liability aspects and decided even if a few thousand people fell to their deaths in a horrific bridge collapse it would still be cheaper than shit-canning the old steel and buying new.

And guess what folks. The damn thing is still standing to this day.

By the way ed, if you end ONE MORE SENTENCE with a preposition you and I are gonna go round and round, are we clear on this one? el oh el

E-dog / just the facts mam'
when it absolutely, positively, has to be destroyed overnight, call the Marines.

I will nevah, EVAH take a pinch from a greasy muddahf*@kah like you!

How 'bout if I spell it out for ya. D-I-L-L-I-G-A-F

#13 twisted_ophelia

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 05:29 PM

I agree with Trin, and others. Some of those claims seem far-fetched (particularly that hearing loss one) but hell, you never know. I think the issue would be people trying these 'cures' and excluding conventional medicine at the risk of their own health. Honey definitely has healing properties but it's probably not some kind of crazy miracle cure for all that ails you. Slathering honey on a pressure sore believing it will totally fix it up and then sitting on your ass all day and letting it fester without doing whatever else your doctor recommends, still believing the honey will cure you, could be a death sentence. I have a friend who is a herbalist and extremely well-schooled in herbal medicine and she believes in combining the effects of herbal medicine with conventional medicine for the best results.

And, wow, yeah, that was a lot of references. Sorry, but I won't be looking them all up!

Edited by twisted_ophelia, 16 July 2009 - 05:30 PM.

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#14 Tetracyclone

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 12:54 AM

It is never a particular claim that alarms me, but rather the snake oil approach wherein X will cure just about anything that ails you. OK, cinnomon is a great tonic, especially with honey. Best let it rest there.

Edited by Pwuff, 02 January 2010 - 12:55 AM.



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