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#1 graphic

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 03:24 PM

I thought it's about time I got on my ass and did something energetic to keep fit and I'm thinking of giving hand cycling a go. I've been looking at a second hand Freedom Ryder Classic (on the internet) that splits in two and am wondering if anyone has any experience of these and, if so, are you able to get it in and out of a car on your own. I don't want to spend too much in case I don't like it so any tips would be appreciated.
Thanks :dev:

#2 edlee

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 04:50 PM

Isn't that the problem??? So often, good intentions cause us to buy things that become,, before long,, clothes racks,,, or merely storage problems.

Then, there they sit,, reminding us of what we should be doing,,,, so we throw another coat on top, so we can't make out what they really are.

I don't know if you've heard of Disaboom,,, it's like a web newsletter,,,, this month they had a nice article about a woman's cycling trip through the Himalayas(sp). One of the links at the end of the story had another interesting article on selecting hand bikes. If I was more proficient with this thing, I would post the links,, but since I'm not,, googling disaboom will be faster for you.
ed

Edited by edlee, 17 October 2009 - 04:51 PM.


#3 graphic

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 06:01 PM

Isn't that the problem??? So often, good intentions cause us to buy things that become,, before long,, clothes racks,,, or merely storage problems.

Then, there they sit,, reminding us of what we should be doing,,,, so we throw another coat on top, so we can't make out what they really are.


Yes ed, I seem to have accumulated quite a few unwanted things over the years that seemed like a good idea when I bought them, lol. That's the reason I don't want to spend too much...it seems like a good idea right now with the sun shining but I'll probably feel different come winter. The problem with things like handcycles is that if it's too awkward to get in the car on my own it will just end up not being used, as you said.
Thanks for the tip about Disaboom, I'll check it out.

#4 guido

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 06:23 PM

Hi - Click here for the link that edlee mentions.

AlsoKaren Darke has her own website: http://www.karendarke.com/

and I can really recommend her book which you can buy on her site or on amazon. It's beautifully written, easy to read and an interesting account without being egotistic. Am sure most people here would relate to it (or parts of it at least).

for UK residents - DisabledGear.com - the FREE-Ads website for 2nd hand disability equipment.

#5 graphic

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 07:01 PM

Thanks for the link guido.
Cycling through the Himalayas would be an experience of a lifetime...but I'm thinking more along the lines of cycling along the prom! :rolleyes: I'll get the book though, it sounds like a good read.

#6 Doodle

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 08:48 PM

I have to admit I bought a handcycle in March and used it for 2months solid maybe about 4days a week. And due to several injuries since may I havent used it. Im hoping to get back to it, I have a cheap and cheerful team hybrid, I chose this because I could get it in and out my car on my own. As much as Id LOVE a recumbant style, I couldnt get it places as I where I live is not accessible outside so I have to drive some where suitable!

I have no expeience of the freedom ryder, so cant really help in that respect!

Edited by Doodle-86, 17 October 2009 - 08:50 PM.

Everything will be alright in the end, if it's not alright then it's not the end!

#7 graphic

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 09:28 PM

Thanks Doodle, it seems you have the problem I'm afraid I'll be landed with....getting the bike out of the car on my own. There are loads of suitable places to ride near my home but I live on a mountain side so it takes a short car journey to get to them. Bike-on sell a carrier that looks good but I'd need to fit a tow bar to my car to fit it and it's all extra expense. I'm starting to think maybe I should let the bike that's on offer go and try to find a way of trying one out first. I've looked to see if there are any clubs near me but can't find any and I'm the kind of person that hates having a demo from a dealer when know I'm not going to buy.

#8 graphic

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 09:28 PM

Edited because I posted the same reply twice sorry!

Edited by graphic, 17 October 2009 - 09:37 PM.


#9 Doodle

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 09:40 PM

I almost considered getting myself a van, just so i could have a recumbant handcycle. As I dont have my trailer test, that eliminated the towing option for me! But I must add it is great having a handcycle, especially when the sun is out! Good exercise and fun way to do it! Big thumbs up!!!!
Everything will be alright in the end, if it's not alright then it's not the end!

#10 graphic

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 10:01 PM

The carrier that Bike-on sells is like an ordinary bike rack and costs about 200. Here's the link:
http://bike-on.com/p...e-rack-1192.htm

Bike_OnGo1.gif

#11 russ1

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 08:45 AM

For what it's worth my recumbent handbike (topend xlt pro) fits in the back of my volvo estate (and before that my saab estate) quite comfortably, I just drop one of the rear seats down and it rolls right in , just have to take off the rear wheels which is a 15 sec job each side. Getting it in and out is easy enough.
Russ - T2complete

#12 graphic

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 04:21 PM

For what it's worth my recumbent handbike (topend xlt pro) fits in the back of my volvo estate (and before that my saab estate) quite comfortably, I just drop one of the rear seats down and it rolls right in , just have to take off the rear wheels which is a 15 sec job each side. Getting it in and out is easy enough.

Thanks Russ! It's good to know that they're quite easy to handle as that was my main concern. I drive a Renault Scenic but I dare say I might get a cycle in if I fold the front passenger seat forward as well as the back seats down. I've decided to hang fire on buying one and I'm looking for someone local who has a handcycle I might try.
This video has put me off the Freedom Ryder a little:



I don't know if I could lean that far that easily....and I don't fancy falling off! :blushing02:

#13 Bluebell

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 01:48 PM

Graphic
This is my first post on here so not sure if I will get it right or what it'll look like when it is posted! Apologies if I mess it up.

I have a Freedom Ryder bike - I bought it earlier this year having had a chance to try out a variety of different makes and models of handcycles. Mine is the lurid green bike they manufacture - I can't remember the model name. I can't recommed a handcycle highly enough and I think the Freedom Ryder is great. It is a good all-round bike and probably a good starter bike. I am sure the folks who are into racing wouldn't choose it but mine has coped with roads and forest tracks including some pretty muddy and narrow ones.

The bike is completely adjustable which is why it makes a good first bike and all of the people I know with spinal injuries are able to get them in and out of their cars without assistance and to transfer in and out of the bike. It just takes a bit of practice.

If you want to know anymore about their bikes, the import process (easy when you know how) etc then let me know and I will be happy to help.

Edited by Bluebell, 20 October 2009 - 01:48 PM.


#14 robbo100bike

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 03:22 PM

Hi Graphic

I have been handcycling for past 10years and love it because of the independence it gives me and i find its a great way to keep fit. My bikes rarely gather dust and dont hang clothes on them either!! But alot depends on your own motivation. If you buy a secondhand bike they are easy to sell on later if it didnt suit but new bikes will enivatbly mean some loss of value. I have sold a few bikes this year but at present dont have anything to sell.

You will have no problem fitting most handcycles in the Scenic, i have transported mine in cars as small as a VW Golf Hatchback and once in a Honda Civic Coupe with the bike in the front seat!!! ( Not recommended)

I have ridden the freedom ryder lean steer bikes but dont own one although I know a man who does. (based in Lancashire). The lean steer is strange to use at first but you quickly get the hang of it, its abit like riding a motorbike in that respect! i wouldrecommend u try as many bikes as possible before buying they can be expensive and therefore its best to know what suits your needs first. If you have stomach muscles / abs / lower back then a "longseat" type bike (like the Top End Force G) might suit you. Otheriwse most higher level para opt for a "reclined bike" (like the Std Force or Quickie Shark), these rely mainly on arm / shoulder power.The latter reclined bikes are very aerodynamic and favoured amongst the racers. I currently ride a Top End K series Kneeling bike which is not everyones cup of tea in terms of position but i find it best for my needs. I also have a prototype 2 wheeler!

I would recommend:

Join or contact uk handcycling assoc http://www.handcyclinguk.org.uk/ they have a selection of bikes such as Top End Pro, force and Draft bikes. These can be tried / tested at their events and they may loan you one for a few weeks too. They have get together days and training weekends throughout the year.

Post on http://uk.groups.yah.../handcyclinguk/ i know of at least 2 uk riders / racers in south wales who might be local to you and able to help you out.

If all else fails send me a PM and will see what else i can do thro my contacts.

IF you decide to import new then i can send you the necessary forms and explain the process. Its straight forward enough provided you have the right paperwork in place before your shipment arrives.

Hope that helps PM me if i can offer any further advice

Robbo

For what it's worth my recumbent handbike (topend xlt pro) fits in the back of my volvo estate (and before that my saab estate) quite comfortably, I just drop one of the rear seats down and it rolls right in , just have to take off the rear wheels which is a 15 sec job each side. Getting it in and out is easy enough.


Russ,

Off topic apologies. Hows that Kuschall Champion working out?

Robbo

#15 graphic

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 10:32 PM

Thanks for all the advice Robbo. I joined the Yahoo group yesterday and posted a message there today asking if there are any members in the South Wales area who might let me try a handcycle. My back muscles aren't very good so I think I might be better off with a 'reclined bike' judging fom what you said. It's also good to know I could fit one in the car!

Thanks also Bluebell, I'll drop you a message asking about the Freedom Ryder. The one you have is a little pricey for me though :wheelchair:

Edited by graphic, 20 October 2009 - 10:33 PM.


#16 Bluebell

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 08:26 AM

Thanks for all the advice Robbo. I joined the Yahoo group yesterday and posted a message there today asking if there are any members in the South Wales area who might let me try a handcycle. My back muscles aren't very good so I think I might be better off with a 'reclined bike' judging fom what you said. It's also good to know I could fit one in the car!

Thanks also Bluebell, I'll drop you a message asking about the Freedom Ryder. The one you have is a little pricey for me though :head_brick_wall-1:


Hi Graphic
I am really sorry that the bike might be on the pricey side for you. I am in the very fortunate position to have a good job (I had this job pre-disability, my employer was pretty decent about things and am still able to work doing what I did before). I guess that makes it less difficult for me financially although it brings its own problems, LOL. That said, I did try to look for something second hand and I really struggled to find anything at all which is why I took the plunge and bought new. Many people have their bikes built to order so it can be hard to get something second hand that is suitable. I have the added complication of an unstable condition so I needed to "future-proof" my purchase - what works for me today may be useless in the future if I lose more function.

If you are importing from the USA you can claim exemption from VAT and import duties - I can send you copies of the forms if you PM me. I got all of mine well prepared in advance and I think I managed a record-breaking time for customs clearance - my bike was cleared through customs within just a few hours of arriving in the UK!

I am also a member of the UK Handcycling Association - they often have second hand bikes for sale or "people who know people" who can hook you up with people who have bikes you can try/buy. It is really hard to walk in anywhere and look at/try out handcycles which is a pain. In Scotland where I am, it isn't just hard, it is totally impossible since absolutely nobody sells them.

Please feel free to get in touch if you want more info and I will do whatever I can to help.

#17 robbo100bike

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 10:22 AM

Bluebell makes some good points. The import process can be done via email and needs to be done in advance because if you dont collect your bike within a couple of days they can start charging you storage.

Secondhand bikes are like rocking horse wotsits!! But they do come up for sale, as Bluebell says buying new allows you to spec a bike which suits you whereas secondhand can often be a compromise based on someone elses choices. If you keep an eye on ebay i have seen handbikes sell for as little as 200 right through to nearly new prices. A Top End XLT 7 speed bike sold the other week for less than 300, it needed a few jobs doing but nothing a competent enthusiast or local cycle shop wouldnt sort. The handcycling assoc tend to circulate emails with bikes for sale too. There is a good german website http://www.handbike....gi-bin/basar.pl its not unfeasible to buy a bike from there and have it shipped or with cheap flights have a day trip.

There are a few companies in the UK who have showrooms and bikes you can try - Draft Wheelchairs in Cambs and Bromakin in Loughborough but that would mean a road trip unless you live local.

I have often fancied setting up a shop but its not a big market. We have a website for buying n selling which we use to try and match buyers with sellers but there are only 3 bikes on it and only one is for sale because we havent updated it yet!!! http://handcycles.synthasite.com/ This year we have sold a quickie shark, top end gold and couple of clip-ons. I also know a friend who has bought and sold a few decent bikes too.

If i hear of anything i will of course let you know. i do have a Draft Reclined Racing bike which was built and belongs to a female friend, i dont think its for sale but could be tried.

I am contemplating buying a bike called a Rodamax from South America for myself as a secondbike, they look good quality and are very cheap too.

Good luck
Paul

#18 robbo100bike

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 10:27 AM

PS Pop back to the handcycling yahoo group you have 2 replies already offering help!! So hopefully you will be up n riding soon. Let us know how you get on.

Edited by robbo100bike, 21 October 2009 - 10:28 AM.


#19 graphic

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 11:01 AM

Please feel free to get in touch if you want more info and I will do whatever I can to help.


Thanks Bluebell, much appreciated. I liked the look of your cycle when I first saw it on the Freedom Ryder website. I went as far as showing it to my wife who also thought it looked nice....but not as nice as new carpet would look :head_brick_wall-1:

#20 graphic

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 11:25 AM

PS Pop back to the handcycling yahoo group you have 2 replies already offering help!! So hopefully you will be up n riding soon. Let us know how you get on.


Thanks Paul, I saw the messages this morning and will be giving Paul (Porthcawl) a ring this evening. He said he's in touch with a few local riders and should be able to arrange for me to try a few so that should be good. I'm looking to spend a max of 1000 if I can get something decent for that. I'm quite short (5'6) so that might be a problem with buying second hand. My wheelchair seat if 15" wide so should a bike seat be the same or can I go for a wider seat? Most I've seen seem to be 16". I like the idea of joining a local group as I don't really fancy it being a solitary experience. I'll let you know how I get on.
Thanks again, Clive
ps
I quite liked this one but it's a little over budget:
http://bike-on.com/p...-speed-1218.htm

#21 graphic

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 02:10 PM

Please feel free to get in touch if you want more info and I will do whatever I can to help.


You have a PM!

#22 robbo100bike

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 02:26 PM

PS Pop back to the handcycling yahoo group you have 2 replies already offering help!! So hopefully you will be up n riding soon. Let us know how you get on.


Thanks Paul, I saw the messages this morning and will be giving Paul (Porthcawl) a ring this evening. He said he's in touch with a few local riders and should be able to arrange for me to try a few so that should be good. I'm looking to spend a max of 1000 if I can get something decent for that. I'm quite short (5'6) so that might be a problem with buying second hand. My wheelchair seat if 15" wide so should a bike seat be the same or can I go for a wider seat? Most I've seen seem to be 16". I like the idea of joining a local group as I don't really fancy it being a solitary experience. I'll let you know how I get on.
Thanks again, Clive
ps
I quite liked this one but it's a little over budget:
http://bike-on.com/p...-speed-1218.htm




Hi Clive

Most bikes have adjustment in the crank position, seat position and leg rests, so most heights , weights n sizes can be accomodated on one machine. Eg The Top End Pro you have seen. Legrests can be shortened or if you are really short of leg reversed. The exception to this rule are the bespoke race bikes where the crank and seat tend to be fixed for the individual rider.

I would go for the narrowest seat width possible 14 or 15" but it wouldnt be any hardship if all you can find is a 16" or wider. Riding as a group is always more enjoyable but riding alone has its merits too. Handcycling is very social and you can ride with family and friends too.

A budget of 1000 should buy you a decent secondhand bike, i have owned quite a few Top End Pros and paid 500-900 secondhand depending on condition. Try posting a wanted advert here and on spinal.co.uk and handcycling yahoo.

On further thought i know of a Quickie Shark for 1500 in new condition

Have you seen the Intrepid Handcycle? http://www.intrepidequipment.com/ Its a USA bike and isnt much more than 1000 new. Also check out www.rodamax.com they have just developed a new bike called a Xoma. Both bikes look like good recreational bikes but wouldnt be very competitive if you want to take up racing. I havent tried either bike and you might struggle to find any in the UK BUT price cant be ignored. I am guessing that its hilly round your way, so make sure the bike you choose has a good range of gears 21-27speed would be best.

Meantime i will keep ears open for any other bikes.

Cheers
Paul

#23 greybeard

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 02:33 PM

Hi all,

I've been following this thread with interest as I'm toying with getting a clip-on. I'm favouring the Team Hybrid Dual Drive SRAM over their other options, mainly because of the range of gears. Would anyone care to share their thoughts on this choice? A recumbent would not suit me.

"Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day;  Rage, rage against the dying of the light" 

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#24 graphic

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 03:19 PM

Hi Clive

Most bikes have adjustment in the crank position, seat position and leg rests, so most heights , weights n sizes can be accomodated on one machine. Eg The Top End Pro you have seen. Legrests can be shortened or if you are really short of leg reversed. The exception to this rule are the bespoke race bikes where the crank and seat tend to be fixed for the individual rider.

I would go for the narrowest seat width possible 14 or 15" but it wouldnt be any hardship if all you can find is a 16" or wider. Riding as a group is always more enjoyable but riding alone has its merits too. Handcycling is very social and you can ride with family and friends too.

A budget of 1000 should buy you a decent secondhand bike, i have owned quite a few Top End Pros and paid 500-900 secondhand depending on condition. Try posting a wanted advert here and on spinal.co.uk and handcycling yahoo.

On further thought i know of a Quickie Shark for 1500 in new condition

Have you seen the Intrepid Handcycle? http://www.intrepidequipment.com/ Its a USA bike and isnt much more than 1000 new. Also check out www.rodamax.com they have just developed a new bike called a Xoma. Both bikes look like good recreational bikes but wouldnt be very competitive if you want to take up racing. I havent tried either bike and you might struggle to find any in the UK BUT price cant be ignored. I am guessing that its hilly round your way, so make sure the bike you choose has a good range of gears 21-27speed would be best.

Meantime i will keep ears open for any other bikes.

Cheers
Paul


Hi Paul,

Thanks for the info about adjustability, most helpful. I've looked at the intrepid and thought it looks good value but the fact that itonly comes with an 18" seat put me off a little,along with a turning circle of 12' as compared to the feedom Ryder's turning circle of 8'. Other than that I thought it looks good. I wasn't too keen on the Quickie Shark because it looks a little cumbersome, but of course I haven't tried on so can't say. I'm still really taken with the Freedom Ryder FH-1 and am sorely tempted to up the budget although I'd rather not. It seems it would cost me roughly 2600 including postage from the US and my wife could buy a lot of carpet for that, lol. I was concerned about the steering but saw this on a web forum:

"In answer to you're question, the Freedom Ryders are harder to ride at first than the non lean steer bikes ie, the Top End. I rode a Top End bike since 1997 and switched to the Freedom Ryder this past Spring, a lot of folks told me once you switch to the Freedom Ryder you will never get back on the Top End, they were right. The Freedom Ryder is a lot more interesting to ride as you feel a lot more connected to the Handcycle rather than just sitting there cranking away with you're arms and you can keep on pedaling even in Corners whereas with the non lean steer you have to back off from pedalling in corners. The drawback of the Freedom Ryder is that it does not not turn as sharply as the Top End in tight sections when going slow and like I said, harder to ride at first till you get the hang of it, usaully just for the first day. Transfer on and off either bike are not bad once you get the h
ang of it, I know a few Quads who transfer on and off these bikes independantly."

and:

"I took a spin on my Top End today around the neiborhood, first time riding that bike in quite awhile over the Freedom Ryder. I think I hit the nail on the head in saying that you do not feel as connected to the bike as you do on the Freedom Ryder, I much more enjoy riding the Freedom Ryder. For someone just trying out the Freedom Ryder for the first time, you may just like the Top End better as it is infact easier to ride at first and you really have to get the hang of riding the Freedom Ryder, once you do get the hang of it, I think you may find that you like the Freedom Ryder better. If you can swing it, definately consider the CB1, it is a great bike. You will be the envy of other riders on this bike and be at a clear performance advantage."

I'm going to wait until I can try a couple of bikes locally and see where to go from there. In the meantime if you could keep your eyes open that would be great. Following on from what you said about family riding, my wife now thinks she might like to get a foot powered recumbent....bang goes the carpet, lol. I wouldn't be looking to spend much on that though, just a few hundred. You're quite right about it being hilly around here but it's only a 5 minute drive to the local prom and a 5 minute drive will also taken me a to cycle track that goes along the coast to Mumbles, and both are quite quiet and almost totally flat. I'm in no particular hurry but it would be nice to get one by Christmas.

Thanks again, Clive

#25 robbo100bike

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 03:21 PM

Hi all,

I've been following this thread with interest as I'm toying with getting a clip-on. I'm favouring the Team Hybrid Dual Drive SRAM over their other options, mainly because of the range of gears. Would anyone care to share their thoughts on this choice? A recumbent would not suit me.



Hi Greybeard,

I am no expert on clip ons, strictly recumbents for me! I have often thought of getting one to use to take kids out cycling but havent yet. My mate Steve aka bobski is the clip on expert. It is my understanding in order to get good traction you need a chair with the rear wheels set further back than normal and for this reason it can be costly to purchase bike and a suitable wheelchair. You can see the rear wheel position on the team hybrid website (side shot of the coyote shimano 07). I know alot of clip on riders leave their bike and chair permanently attached because i believe attaching them isnt as easy as marketed. IF this is the main reason for considering a clip on, then i would suggest you investigate docking / undocking further before a purchase and make sure you can do it yourself, dont just take the work of the seller.

For example do you want to cycle to the pub or shops?? Do you want to undock bike part and wheel into the premises?? Consider how you would undock the bike, would you have to get out of the wheelchair? Also how would you remove the chair wheels from the rear set position and then re-position them in the normal chair postion. Then transfer back into wheelchair and push off to your destination. AND vice versa. Its not impossible, the brochures all say its easy??? But that depends on your ability and the reality might not live up to expectations. But as i say i have no real experience just what i have been told or seen. It would be one area i would consider carefully. See if they can loan you a bike or perhaps contact handcycling assoc or wheels for all and borrow a clip on handcycle?

There is a praschberger clip on for sale on ebay as we speak and to my mind this is one of the best clip ons available having 24gears and a decent sized front wheel.

Alot depend on what you intend using it for and your expectations. The dual drive has a decent gear set up which is good as you have already guessed and i have to admit their Coyote Shimano 07 is excelent value at 895 it wont break any speed records and will probably struggle up significant hills BUT for gentle routes it will be faster / easier than pushing.

Also have a look at the Top End Pro / XLT recumbent the seat height is not much lower than a chair. IF you can cope with the transfer the cycling experience and efficiency of a recumbent compared to a clipon is far superior. I am biased tho if you prefer the clip on go for it whichever bike suits your needs best!

Food for thought, i will see if Steve can add some input he has been clip t on for years!

Cheers
Paul

#26 graphic

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 03:21 PM

Hi all,
I've been following this thread with interest as I'm toying with getting a clip-on. I'm favouring the Team Hybrid Dual Drive SRAM over their other options, mainly because of the range of gears. Would anyone care to share their thoughts on this choice? A recumbent would not suit me.


Hi Greybeard,
I don't know anything about the Team Hybrid, sorry...but I can't wait to see you in Lycra! :D
Clive

Edited by graphic, 21 October 2009 - 03:22 PM.


#27 robbo100bike

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 03:44 PM

Hi Clive

Most bikes have adjustment in the crank position, seat position and leg rests, so most heights , weights n sizes can be accomodated on one machine. Eg The Top End Pro you have seen. Legrests can be shortened or if you are really short of leg reversed. The exception to this rule are the bespoke race bikes where the crank and seat tend to be fixed for the individual rider.

I would go for the narrowest seat width possible 14 or 15" but it wouldnt be any hardship if all you can find is a 16" or wider. Riding as a group is always more enjoyable but riding alone has its merits too. Handcycling is very social and you can ride with family and friends too.

A budget of 1000 should buy you a decent secondhand bike, i have owned quite a few Top End Pros and paid 500-900 secondhand depending on condition. Try posting a wanted advert here and on spinal.co.uk and handcycling yahoo.

On further thought i know of a Quickie Shark for 1500 in new condition

Have you seen the Intrepid Handcycle? http://www.intrepidequipment.com/ Its a USA bike and isnt much more than 1000 new. Also check out www.rodamax.com they have just developed a new bike called a Xoma. Both bikes look like good recreational bikes but wouldnt be very competitive if you want to take up racing. I havent tried either bike and you might struggle to find any in the UK BUT price cant be ignored. I am guessing that its hilly round your way, so make sure the bike you choose has a good range of gears 21-27speed would be best.

Meantime i will keep ears open for any other bikes.

Cheers
Paul


Hi Paul,

Thanks for the info about adjustability, most helpful. I've looked at the intrepid and thought it looks good value but the fact that itonly comes with an 18" seat put me off a little,along with a turning circle of 12' as compared to the feedom Ryder's turning circle of 8'. Other than that I thought it looks good. I wasn't too keen on the Quickie Shark because it looks a little cumbersome, but of course I haven't tried on so can't say. I'm still really taken with the Freedom Ryder FH-1 and am sorely tempted to up the budget although I'd rather not. It seems it would cost me roughly 2600 including postage from the US and my wife could buy a lot of carpet for that, lol. I was concerned about the steering but saw this on a web forum:

"In answer to you're question, the Freedom Ryders are harder to ride at first than the non lean steer bikes ie, the Top End. I rode a Top End bike since 1997 and switched to the Freedom Ryder this past Spring, a lot of folks told me once you switch to the Freedom Ryder you will never get back on the Top End, they were right. The Freedom Ryder is a lot more interesting to ride as you feel a lot more connected to the Handcycle rather than just sitting there cranking away with you're arms and you can keep on pedaling even in Corners whereas with the non lean steer you have to back off from pedalling in corners. The drawback of the Freedom Ryder is that it does not not turn as sharply as the Top End in tight sections when going slow and like I said, harder to ride at first till you get the hang of it, usaully just for the first day. Transfer on and off either bike are not bad once you get the h
ang of it, I know a few Quads who transfer on and off these bikes independantly."

and:

"I took a spin on my Top End today around the neiborhood, first time riding that bike in quite awhile over the Freedom Ryder. I think I hit the nail on the head in saying that you do not feel as connected to the bike as you do on the Freedom Ryder, I much more enjoy riding the Freedom Ryder. For someone just trying out the Freedom Ryder for the first time, you may just like the Top End better as it is infact easier to ride at first and you really have to get the hang of riding the Freedom Ryder, once you do get the hang of it, I think you may find that you like the Freedom Ryder better. If you can swing it, definately consider the CB1, it is a great bike. You will be the envy of other riders on this bike and be at a clear performance advantage."

I'm going to wait until I can try a couple of bikes locally and see where to go from there. In the meantime if you could keep your eyes open that would be great. Following on from what you said about family riding, my wife now thinks she might like to get a foot powered recumbent....bang goes the carpet, lol. I wouldn't be looking to spend much on that though, just a few hundred. You're quite right about it being hilly around here but it's only a 5 minute drive to the local prom and a 5 minute drive will also taken me a to cycle track that goes along the coast to Mumbles, and both are quite quiet and almost totally flat. I'm in no particular hurry but it would be nice to get one by Christmas.

Thanks again, Clive


Carpet?? Whats wrong with floorboards??? U can both sit on your recumbents watching TV!!!

You realise that the Freedom Ryder FRH isnt a lean steer model? But it is a v nice looking bike and very versatile being able to adjust to become a longseat or reclined bike. If you want a lean steer look at the CB1 and suggest you try a leansteer 1st.

Turning circles - most handbikes are compared to Super Tankers and we perfect the art of the 21 point turn. Its a pain turning about in a tight area, we live with it. If you think about it you only occasionally need to do a U Turn or greater than 90deg turn. Once you are riding turning and negotiating bends shouldnt be an issue and the more you ride the more skill you develop eg on slow turns out of T junctions, you learn to start wide and cut into the apex.

There are some cracking footpowered recumbents out there. BHPC is a good source of info.

Xmas as a goal should be possible

#28 graphic

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 03:51 PM

Carpet?? Whats wrong with floorboards??? U can both sit on your recumbents watching TV!!!

You realise that the Freedom Ryder FRH isnt a lean steer model? But it is a v nice looking bike and very versatile being able to adjust to become a longseat or reclined bike. If you want a lean steer look at the CB1 and suggest you try a leansteer 1st.

Turning circles - most handbikes are compared to Super Tankers and we perfect the art of the 21 point turn. Its a pain turning about in a tight area, we live with it. If you think about it you only occasionally need to do a U Turn or greater than 90deg turn. Once you are riding turning and negotiating bends shouldnt be an issue and the more you ride the more skill you develop eg on slow turns out of T junctions, you learn to start wide and cut into the apex.

There are some cracking footpowered recumbents out there. BHPC is a good source of info.

Xmas as a goal should be possible


The way my budget keeps going up I'll be burning the floorboards for fuel! :D
I didn't realise the FH-1 wasn't a lean steer, puts things in a different light. I panicked a bit about turning circles because I'm comparing it with how I used to ride an ordinary bike...just get off and turn around if necessary! I suppose it's all a matter of practice. Thanks for the link to BHPC, I'll check it out. I can't wait to try one now! As for the Quickie Shark and Top End range, any idea which you'd go for?
Cheers, Clive
ps
You have PM

Edited by graphic, 21 October 2009 - 03:57 PM.


#29 greybeard

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 04:13 PM

Hi all,
I've been following this thread with interest as I'm toying with getting a clip-on. I'm favouring the Team Hybrid Dual Drive SRAM over their other options, mainly because of the range of gears. Would anyone care to share their thoughts on this choice? A recumbent would not suit me.


Hi Greybeard,
I don't know anything about the Team Hybrid, sorry...but I can't wait to see you in Lycra! :D
Clive

Hehe! I think wool will be more suitable on one of these - may be even a flat cap or a deer-stalker hat :D
http://www.teamhybri...ldrivesram.htm#

Edited by greybeard, 21 October 2009 - 04:13 PM.

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#30 robbo100bike

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 07:43 PM

Carpet?? Whats wrong with floorboards??? U can both sit on your recumbents watching TV!!!

You realise that the Freedom Ryder FRH isnt a lean steer model? But it is a v nice looking bike and very versatile being able to adjust to become a longseat or reclined bike. If you want a lean steer look at the CB1 and suggest you try a leansteer 1st.

Turning circles - most handbikes are compared to Super Tankers and we perfect the art of the 21 point turn. Its a pain turning about in a tight area, we live with it. If you think about it you only occasionally need to do a U Turn or greater than 90deg turn. Once you are riding turning and negotiating bends shouldnt be an issue and the more you ride the more skill you develop eg on slow turns out of T junctions, you learn to start wide and cut into the apex.

There are some cracking footpowered recumbents out there. BHPC is a good source of info.

Xmas as a goal should be possible


The way my budget keeps going up I'll be burning the floorboards for fuel! :D
I didn't realise the FH-1 wasn't a lean steer, puts things in a different light. I panicked a bit about turning circles because I'm comparing it with how I used to ride an ordinary bike...just get off and turn around if necessary! I suppose it's all a matter of practice. Thanks for the link to BHPC, I'll check it out. I can't wait to try one now! As for the Quickie Shark and Top End range, any idea which you'd go for?
Cheers, Clive
ps
You have PM


Either quickie shark model is good, you can get the std shark and upgrade to 27 gears or go for the shark sport which has 27gears as std.

Top End - Force is a cracking bike very low though. The force g relies on u having some trunk control so might not work for you. The Pro has been about for years its not the fastest bike but used to be the bike to have and was raced extensively. Great bike for leisure riding with few faults.

I might know of an XLT for sale will find out more details and let u know.


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