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Transfer Boards




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17 replies to this topic

#1 ArtsyinTx

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 11:53 PM

Can anyone give me some ideas re: transfer boards you like best. I have one of those grooved plastic ones but my husband has to lift me & push me - it's hard on both of us. It's especially useless when I'm wet. Some good experiences anyone?

#2 edlee

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 12:02 AM

The plastic ones work pretty well. I occasionally use one like that in the bathroom when my sholders go out on me. When you are wet, put a small towel on it,, it will be easier to slide on.

If you need one for longer transfers, they make oak ones up to about 3 foot long. The key is to lean far enough to get it under at least one cheek, then go for it.

Most of the paras and many quads have learned to do without them. Just takes practice and a bit of upper body strength,,, but mostly practice.

Good luck
ed

#3 Quad65

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 05:15 PM

To expand on the towel-on-the-board method a bit: I've used a wooden sliding board for decades. I keep it slippery by using a spray-on furniture polish. When my butt gets a bit sticky from humidity in the summer, I sometimes tuck a medium-sized plastic bag under my butt-cheek before transfers in and out of the car. It slides much easier that way. It may also work for transfers in and out of the shower/bath. Dry off as much as possible, lay the flattened bag on the board with the a folded hand-towel on top of the flattened bag, slip this 'sandwich' under one butt-cheek and slide away.

Edited by Quad65, 12 December 2009 - 05:17 PM.

-- Whatever doesn't kill you, makes you want to get even real bad.

#4 javaftper

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 02:04 AM

i use a beasy board which contains an embedded circular disc.

i find this board much easier to use than standard boards.

http://www.activefor...easy-trans.aspx

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#5 norma

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 11:36 PM

I use a wooden board that my brother in law made that looks just like the one I used in rehab. About 2 feet long, rounded edges, and 8 inches wide. I only use it getting into bed and for transfers in the bath/shower. I have a large 3x3 sheet made of shiny slippery materail ( like skirt/dress lining) and I use this for transfers when I am naked for toilet/shower. Transfers are eaisier with this and I also use baby powder as it makes it slippery as well. The powder I use on the bath bench. Hope this helps :)

#6 Raspberry

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 01:39 AM

i use a beasy board which contains an embedded circular disc.

i find this board much easier to use than standard boards.

http://www.activefor...easy-trans.aspx

My board of choice also, following Flap Surgery on a Stage 4 Ischial Pressure Sore...

Thing is...like me I spose...it has a screw loose. Well, missing actually, but ya know, doesn't fit the 'joke'. Now, I've tried contacting the UK distributor (Ferno), and now I've emailed the actual manufacturer, BeasyTrans System Inc in the States - To which I've had NO response except "We're dealing with your query". Which they're not, obviously.

#7 ebeth

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 05:41 AM

I like the plastic boards. For transferring out of the shower when I'm damp, I use a slider. Basically it's a strip of nylon cloth that's sewn into a loop. I tuck part of it under the edge of the board before sliding. Then as I transfer, the layer of the slider that's against my skin slides on the bottom layer of the slider. That way my skin doesn't stick to the board while I transfer.

I also have a wooden board as back-up. I also use it when I need to transfer over a wider space. I like wooden ones for that because they won't bow (like my plastic one) when my weight is in the center of the board.

#8 Aparr

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 11:24 AM

I use a 30" wooden finish transfer board. There's no lifting needed for me using this board. I'm able o place it under my leg and go.
http://www.amazon.co...d/dp/B000LX5A60

Bets of luck!
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-mark twain

#9 randomryan007

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 07:24 PM

I use ultra slick transferboards here's a link http://www.mobility-...sfer-board.html

#10 T A

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 06:12 PM

I like the plain http://www.therafin.com/econoglide.htm in plastic. Then drill a couple 1" holes to make grabbing/positioning it a little easier. Armor All or Pledge work great to keep it slippery.

Now for showering, next time take a soapy washcloth and squeeze it on the board just before transferring - make sure the soapy water runs under your leg/butt. I will warn you this makes it very slippery when transferring so hang on good. Discovered this by accident about a year ago - try it!

Tim

#11 Modeus

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 06:08 AM

i use a beasy board which contains an embedded circular disc.

i find this board much easier to use than standard boards.

http://www.activefor...easy-trans.aspx

I like this one as well, though its not very good when wet. big problem i had with the wooden boards is if you drop em they tend to splinter.

#12 McTavish

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 04:35 PM

I have been using a wooden board since rehab 6 years ago but it is now a bit shabby and I am risking getting a splinter in the rear, so my physio got me a banana board but I am finding it a bit heavier than the wooden one and it has nowhere to grab onto. My son is going to do a job on it for me with the jigsaw and put a cutout to grab it and maybe trim it a little, then hopefully it will be o.k.

#13 LeviM

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 05:25 PM

My favorite sliding board was a wooden board that was super glossy and super slippery. It makes it easy. I've had a couple plastic ones and I didn't like them at all as sliding across them was difficult at best.

Edited by LeviM, 24 February 2012 - 05:25 PM.


#14 hmc915

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 03:05 AM

My boyfriend has two maple sliding board similiar to these http://www.activefor...sfer-board.aspx . He used a smaller one in rehab until he learned depression transfers. Now we use this smaller one to help him get off the couch. He also has a longer one he uses to get in the car.

#15 richo

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 07:29 AM

I have been using a wooden board since rehab 6 years ago but it is now a bit shabby and I am risking getting a splinter in the rear, so my physio got me a banana board but I am finding it a bit heavier than the wooden one and it has nowhere to grab onto. My son is going to do a job on it for me with the jigsaw and put a cutout to grab it and maybe trim it a little, then hopefully it will be o.k.

just sand ya wooden one and relaqer it with a clear gloss

#16 richo

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 07:37 AM

my wife wraps a silde sheet around a wooden slideboard,but becarefull very very slipery

#17 cruiserkb

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:02 PM

This may be a little unconventional but I use a skate board deck as a transfer board. I like it because it has two advantages over the standard ones. First it is concave down the center length. This keeps me centered on the board more and prevents slipping off as much. Second is it has lips on each end that go up. This helps with verry high transfers because the lower lip acts like a cantelever to start the lift onto the board and and the upper lip allows you to put alot of force on the top to lift the entire board and not smash your fingers under the board. If you plan on using this method I would sugest that you go to a local skate board shop and get a quality made deck. The cheaper ones don't have as many plys in its construction and are more prone to breaking. My last deck cost me around $60 US and I have been using it for about a year now. Just an alternative and it looks less institutional than standard ones if you take it out in public alot. Hope this helps.

#18 McTavish

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:59 AM

This may be a little unconventional but I use a skate board deck as a transfer board. I like it because it has two advantages over the standard ones. First it is concave down the center length. This keeps me centered on the board more and prevents slipping off as much. Second is it has lips on each end that go up. This helps with verry high transfers because the lower lip acts like a cantelever to start the lift onto the board and and the upper lip allows you to put alot of force on the top to lift the entire board and not smash your fingers under the board. If you plan on using this method I would sugest that you go to a local skate board shop and get a quality made deck. The cheaper ones don't have as many plys in its construction and are more prone to breaking. My last deck cost me around $60 US and I have been using it for about a year now. Just an alternative and it looks less institutional than standard ones if you take it out in public alot. Hope this helps.



I was impressed with you using a skate board Cruiserkb that is a very novel idea, and I bet it looks much better than the plain old wooden and plastic. I gave my new banana board back to the physio as it was too big and heavy and he is getting me a smaller plastic one with a grab hole in it.


Spinal Cord Injury & Cauda Equina Syndrome Support

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