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Turning Side To Side




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26 replies to this topic

#1 dexter

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 03:01 AM

So I was always trained to turn from side to side at night from the beginning. I'm very used to it but I've been wanting to sleep on my back because I heard that there's a lot of people that do it. I'm just wondering how you train yourself actually do it. I have a hard time sleeping at night as is and have to hire somebody to help me out.

Did you start out turning side to side and then change to sleeping through the night on your back?

I'm trying to get used to it but I'm finding it very hard. I would love to be able to sleep through the night without needing the help of somebody else.

Have you switched from that before?

#2 Ches

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 03:15 AM

Not a quad, but I can tell ya how it starts for me......

I typically fall asleep laying on my side, at some point Ill 'wake up' with the urge to shift, being half asleep and super lazy I usually just turn with my shoulders which will trigger a spasm and I just go with it.. sometime I end up on my back, sometimes my legs wanna curl so I use their energy to turn all the way over..

Took me two yrs or so to figure out how my body reacts and how I can flip flop around with waking up tooo much.
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#3 BillS

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 04:06 AM

Took me two yrs or so to figure out how my body reacts and how I can flip flop around with waking up tooo much.


Don't you love it when the spasms actually work for you? I roll over in bed on my side and my legs spasm to curl up. I roll onto my back and my legs spasm to straighten out. I roll onto my stomach and they....well I'm not sure what they do because there's no where for them to be except straight...but they still spasm to go somewhere. :doh:

Sorry I can't give the quad viewpoint Dex but I also start on my side and toss and turn all night long. Hitting each side, back and front. For me it's more a matter of each position having a problem that eventually wakes me up so I turn from it.

Lying on my right side hurts my right arm after about an hour because of the rotator cuff injuries I've had on my right arm.

Lying on my left side bend my back in the direction of my scoliosis and makes that hurt after a bit.

On my back I snore and wake up sometimes to catch my breath.

On my stomach I get bad heartburn and wake up with a throat full of acid sometimes.

So my tossing and turning has developed over the years out of necessity not training.
Just a regular guy making his way through life.

#4 S&W Winger

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 04:16 AM

Man, you guys are lucky...I cannot turn, cannot roll myself over at all...and am stuck in the same on my back position at all times...fortunately, I have an alternating pressure mattress...I've been sleeping on my back for 16 months now (OK, not continuously! Though I do sometimes wonder as to my level of consciousness...LOL!) I long for the days I could sleep on my side...cannot, even if turned, as any longer than a few minutes causes searing shoulder, arm and rib pain (fractured both arms/shoulder/bilateral multiple ribs, none of which ever fully healed properly)...


But to address your question, Dexter: Why do YOU desire to sleep on your back? You "heard" people do it? It is really not good as far as pressure wounds, breathing, etc. (Bill, you may want to consider a visit with a pulmonologist re: sleep apnea, for a CPAP, if your snoring causes you to stop breathing)...


If your reason is to do away with someone to turn you....then why not acquire an alternating pressure mattress?

Edited by S&W Winger, 05 June 2010 - 04:21 AM.

Beverly


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#5 Fazer386

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 04:38 AM

Yes & Yes.

I started off propping on each side every three hours to avoid pressure sore on tailbone. PITA! Wake up & turn, wake up & turn and so on... so how do you get a solid nights sleep.

My solution: Air-mattress. Plus, Trazodone. Pressure sore healed right away. I just started the Trazodone six weeks ago and it's working really well. I sleep on my back with fluffy pillows all around me.

#6 MrBump

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 04:52 AM

i sleep on my back without turning all night long, which is usually 9 hrs, on a normal latex mattress.
never had a skin issue in 2 years. i use a sheepskin for my heels.

i can roll 1 way and use my bedside table for leverage, not real good anyway as i'll roll off the bed.
the other way is no good anyway as the wife is there hoggin the rest of the bed.

just give it a go and see what happens, you may get lucky with no marks...................problem solved !
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Failure is not getting back up.

#7 xxm

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 03:56 PM

Dexter,

I can not sleep on my back at all - spasms and sweating and some time mild AD. Unfortunately sometimes I have to prevent my hips from wounds and then I sleep my back with FLEXED LEGS. My bed touches the wall so I flex the legs and abut them against the wall. This position has two advantages:

1. Abdomen wall is not under tension, so you can breath easily, also less spasms.
2. Feet are naturally positioned on the bed preventing you from heals wounds.

and also one disadvantage - if you have swollen ankles they can not recover as easily.

Rudy
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#8 hisamsmith

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 04:26 PM

I turn from side to back and back to side every night unassisted. First I use no pillows to keep my legs apart or behind my back to stay on my side. I wear pajama pants everynight. If I want to turn on my right side I put my left arm inside the left pant leg and flip my leg over my right one (my legs are contracted at the knee aka frog legged). I then grab onto something on the right side of the bed with my left arm and pull myself onto my side. My something for the last 4 years has been my husband. But before that it was the handrail of my bed. Rolling on to my back is easier I just lean back and I let my body "fall" on the bed.

Samantha

#9 Texaswheelz

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 05:03 AM

20 years after rehab and I still wake and turn every 2-3 hours. Been lucky and never gotten a sore (knock on wood). I usually fall asleep on my back watching tv. Then wake about the time it auto turns itself off and rol to one of my sides. Some nights are real bad and I feel like I roll every 30 minutes or so. Probably been less then 10 times in those 20 years that I have slept the night all the way through. Always when I'm just completly and totally exhausted, wish it happened more often

#10 McRobb

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 05:11 PM

I was a side sleeper before accident but usually ended up on my back by morning. Since accident, I sleep on my back all night but I have an alternating pressure mattress and have never had a sore from it, even this time when I have been in bed 24/7 for the last almost 3 months at home.

After our accident, injuries and external fixators made me sleep on my back for over 2 months. By the time I went home, I was used to it. Will tell you that while in the hospital this past winter, staff was turning me every 2 hours even though I was on a air pressure "rocking" bed. Bed went up on one side for 3 minutes and then flat and them up on other side for 3 minutes. Felt like laying in a slowly rocking boat!

Wound care nurses were concerned that the bed was not relieving pressure as much as I needed, hence the 2 hour turns. So, I did get to sleep propped over on my side quite often and had forgotten how good it felt to do that. Of course, had to have pillows propped everywhere around me and under and between legs to stay that way but I had people around to do that for me there. At home, I do not have that option so am back to my back for the night with heels off bed.

If you are having trouble breathing on your back, please do as they others suggested and get a sleep check up. I did not have the apnea so bad but the acid reflux was so bad at night that a pulmonary doctor wanted me to use bipap machine at high pressure to help keep acid out of lungs and out of throat. Has really helped everything!

Best of luck to you.

#11 goldnucs

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 05:18 PM

32 years; I go to sleep laying on my left side with a pillow between my legs to my feet and another behind my back. I wake up the same way. Sometimes I'll pull the pillow out from behind but my knees are still bent to the left.

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#12 Ches

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 10:45 PM

You could try a full body pillow too.. If you sleep with a pillow between your legs, that is..
Sometime I end up laying in "one spot" but shifting pillows all around which keeps me comfy thru the night.
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#13 KronicMayhem

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 03:24 AM

They tried teaching me to wake up and turn myself during the night but as soon as i got home that went out the window and i just started falling asleep on my stomach and would wake up on my side in the morning. I do much the same now a few years later but now i slide my feet through the railing at the end of the bed so when sleeping my legs don't spasm and turn me, i still slowly rotate during the night and wake up on my right side though.

#14 WildKat

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 04:21 AM

Dexter,

I can not sleep on my back at all - spasms and sweating and some time mild AD.
Rudy

This use to happen to me quite often. My heals would get really red and I finally figured out that that, along with my tight hip muscles (it's way too late to remember the name of them) were the culprits. I used a pillow I had folded in half under my legs behind my knees and another smaller pillow under my ankles so my heals didn't touch the bed. This worked and I could sleep on my back without AD. Usually when I wake up at night with AD and it's not because my bladder is too full I know it's a spot somewhere near a joint with too much pressure.

#15 hurbshankin

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 06:47 PM

Came home from the nursing home and slept on an airbed for a few nights. I was being turned every two hours, lame. And I was sleeping in the stairwell, double lame! One night I told my wife I wanna sleep in my own bed with you. A beautiful king size pillow-top firm mattress with a gorgeous blonde wife next to me! I slept the whole night on my back with my legs in the "frog position" with a pillow bwtween my feet and one on my right knee cause when I spaz my left knee typically closes shut on my right. I started this on a freshly healed tailbone pressure sore, which remained healed. I usually sleep 8-9 hrs, but have done 14 hrs! I can only push my elbows into the mattress and arch my back and scootch maybe an inch (literally), that's 2.54 cm for the rest of the world. This sleeping style has served me well. Well, plus Lunesta every other night. That stuff works really well for me where Ambien and Trazadon put me to sleep but I wake up an hour later. Still refining the sleep process!

Hurb



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#16 Big E

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 10:36 PM

I don't have much advice for you. Although, I have full use of my arms and hands, therefore I am able to use the railing on my hospital bed to move into different positions throughout the night.

#17 E-DOG

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 10:53 PM

I don't have much advice for you. Although, I have full use of my arms and hands, therefore I am able to use the railing on my hospital bed to move into different positions throughout the night.


You couldn't POSSIBLY be bigger than me.

E-dog :wink05:

Edited by E-DOG, 07 July 2010 - 11:07 PM.

when it absolutely, positively, has to be destroyed overnight, call the Marines.

I will nevah, EVAH take a pinch from a greasy muddahf*@kah like you!

How 'bout if I spell it out for ya. D-I-L-L-I-G-A-F

#18 rue2you

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 03:09 AM

The first thing I do when getting in bed is to lay on my stomach - it is my favorite thing to stretch the opposite way of how
I have been all day! That comfort lasts about 10 minutes and then I am ready for my side. When I am on my side, I always curl the lower leg up towards my chest and that helps keep me feeling balanced on my side. I wake up a lot in the night and re-adjust, flop to the other side (I let gravity roll me to my back and then throw my leg over the other one and twist my upper body and my legs just follow through), and go right back asleep. Like Tex, there have been a few nights where I never woke up once - because I was really, really tired - but mostly I wake up a lot.
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#19 Texaswheelz

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 05:12 AM

I do the same with laying on my stomach, it's such a good stretch on my lower back and abs, they normally spasm for 5-10 minutes and then I roll back on my back or side. I do it again in the morning before I get up, i think it's one of the things that keeps my spasms down during the day.

#20 AussieBrad

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 08:03 AM

I have slept on my back from day 1.Accident was 15th march 2009. have never had a skin issue,I also put a pillow under my calves to keep my heals of the mattress so not to get pressure sores.
I can only handle a small amount of time on my side due to extensive damage to my sternum and ribs.
I also have trouble sleeping for more then 2hrs at a time so have tried a few diffrent sleeping pills.
Just Keep Smilin'

#21 rolling01au

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 02:11 PM

C5/6 for 17 years,slept on my back ever since leaving hospital use a sheepskin for many years but now use lattex matress with memory foam overlay.Tried laying on side but end up with slight annoying AD after 15-20 mins.

#22 Tetracyclone

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 02:35 PM

I think uninterrupted sleep is overrated. I've been sleeping in 2 to 4 hour stretches for 30 years and am well-rested in the morning after 8 hours total.

#23 Mishelly

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 08:03 AM

I sleep on one side one night then the other side the next night. I have pillows in between my knees, under my feet, and behind my back. My upper body is kind of mixed between back n side. On my feet I have sheepskin booties, which I also wear during the day and have had no problems with my skin. Oh, also, even after all this preparation I end up on my back stretched out by morning from spasms during the night while I sleep. I like that bcuz it gives my legs a chance to be straight instead of always bein bent. Anyways...I havent had any sores from my sleeping positions.

#24 goldnucs

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 06:19 PM

I posted in here ;last June that I'd slept on my left side nearly every night since my injury 32 yrs ago......now 33 years as of today...HAPPY ANNIVERSARY! Anyway, in January, I was told how crooked I sit and realized [duh], that 32.5 yrs on the same side had stretched all my muscles on one side and tightened them on the other, curling me to the left. So now I'm sleeping 2 nights on my right side and 1 on my left. I can already feel the difference.

Rick Goldstein / GO! Mobility Solutions
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#25 Bourdillon

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 12:59 PM

So I was always trained to turn from side to side at night from the beginning. I'm very used to it but I've been wanting to sleep on my back because I heard that there's a lot of people that do it. I'm just wondering how you train yourself actually do it. I have a hard time sleeping at night as is and have to hire somebody to help me out.

Did you start out turning side to side and then change to sleeping through the night on your back?

I'm trying to get used to it but I'm finding it very hard. I would love to be able to sleep through the night without needing the help of somebody else.

Have you switched from that before?

I know this is not what you want to read but I spent 32 years (except on holidays) side to side in a rotating bed. I couldn't sleep without it. I was born to the noise of air conditioning and now it's the water trickling sound of an electric motor. I can go as long as I need. I have done weeks when I have been ill. It keeps my insides and outsides in good condition. I get a good nights sleep without interruption. I can listen to my tapes etc. For washing simply stop the bed and take out the sides. One person can do this if they are reasonably fit. Even a small south-east Asian! Naturally I am a bachelor at bedtime.............. but I've been quadriplegic since 1979.
Good luck.

#26 goldnucs

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 06:43 PM

IMPORTANT UPDATE......Please read my previous posts. Now, for about 6 years I've suffered frightening, life-threatening abdominal spasms which disabled my diaphragm from moving which caused difficulty breathing to the extent of suffocation. On 2 occasions this resulted in ambulance rides to the ER to be revived, once following aspiration (inhalation) of my own vomit which resulted in aspiration pneumonia and a week-long stay in the hospital.. They typically occurred while transferring into my chair in the morning but later on, occurred with increasing randomness at any time, anywhere, though usually following prolonged sessions of sitting still in one place.

I've seen medical professionals in every field over these years to try to determine the cause, and cure, for these frightening "events" or "seizures", to no avail. Gabapentin (a.k.a. Neurontin)worked as a quick short-term emergency "cure" which mitigated both the severity and duration of these seizures, depending on how quickly I managed to get a half (300 mg)chewed-up and swallowed (YUCK!). I ALWAYS have one close by and will chew one up the moment I feel an attack coming on.

2 lifestyle changes have cured me: First was switching the sides on which I slept and, second, wearing an abdominal binder. My theory for the cause of my abdominal spasms was that my innards have shifted such that the ends of my ribs were irritating my abdominal muscles which set-off the spasms once they were moved.

I still experience the seizures, from time-to-time, but with considerably less intensity and they seem to have "moved" such that my diaphragm is not impinged on as much to result in suffocation. I am glad to have this miserable part of my life behind me. Hope this helps someone else as I was unable to ever find anyone who (lived to) report a similar problem.

Rick Goldstein / GO! Mobility Solutions
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#27 Heuer

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 05:17 PM

I am a c3/c4 complete & my mattress is a TURN Q PLUS from INVACARE which I sleep on my back and it turns me from side to side and my back, programable every 4,8 or 20 minutes. Works very well & eliminates having to have someone turn me all night. Hope this helps.


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