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How To Exercise A Spastic Leg?




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7 replies to this topic

#1 benok

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 03:20 AM

My left leg has major problems with tightness. It is so tight that my foot is plantar flexed.
I cannot do exercises because basically it just would not like to participate as if it has a world of its
own. I ice it and i put warm compress but after some time it will just be tight.

I would appreciate how you manage with spastic legs. My right leg is the opposite. It has no sensation and is flaccid.
Both legs are thinning and atrophying.
http://ronaldlora.blogspot.com/

If you cannot face your problem,
the problem is your face.

#2 barbara9999

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 01:27 PM

Hi Benok. I have spasticity on the right side and loss of sensation on the left. (called Brown Segord Sybdrome BSS) I am not in a wheelchair tho. In the morning when I get up i am really really stiff and gently stand on both legs and stretch or even just lie in bed and stretch. This often locks my leg from my toes to the end of my fingers on my right side. I let it lock and just wait for it to relax. Then stand and try to start walking. i find if i can go to the gym and exercise on the bicycle and treadmill for 30 min I am looser. I have not noticed much atrophy because with spasticity it is always excessive. i think the arm and hand is the most irritating with me. People do take muscle relax meds (bacoflen) but I do not tolerate it well. I am going to start getting Botox in my hand soon and I hope this will be an improvement. I see you are in wheelchair so I think you should see a PT and find out what exercuises you can do so that leg will not atrophy and also they will know how to stretch the other leg, and of course some muscle relax meds.

#3 mohit_para

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 01:30 PM

regular hard passive stretching is a best way to reduce spasticity.. and you can take "beclofen" tablets in additional to streching to reduce spasticity... i think the combines effect of both will put a significant effect..

#4 Parachute

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 10:16 PM

My left leg has major problems with tightness. It is so tight that my foot is plantar flexed.
I cannot do exercises because basically it just would not like to participate as if it has a world of its
own. I ice it and i put warm compress but after some time it will just be tight.

I would appreciate how you manage with spastic legs. My right leg is the opposite. It has no sensation and is flaccid.
Both legs are thinning and atrophying.


Hi benok

I simply lie on the floor and extend my body. This is the best stretch that I get but this stretch does give me spasms, and I am a walker. Someone may need to help you and stretch you out. Do not ever use ice on your muscles because tight muscles are already cold. Your muscles need to be warm. I try to stretch I day long.

Ps Look at a book on amazon named The Whartons' Back Book, by Jim & Phil Wharton with Bev Browning. I actually had the book before I got injured.


Parachute

Edited by Parachute, 31 October 2010 - 10:21 PM.


#5 Tetracyclone

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 10:40 PM

My situation is not comparable because I am incomplete and can creep along with a walker.
One part of what I do applies: my left calf muscle was very tight since the accident, but 3 months ago I started stretching it out 8 to 10 times a day. At first it took me 3 or 4 minutes to get it loosened, but now it takes very little time except first thing in the morning. If the trend continues that leg will be normal within a few more months. Stretching will change things but it takes a LOT of repetition and if you cannot do it yourself, who can help that much?

As a para you may be able to get a strap or belt around your foot and pull up. I do this to one the floor and it works great.

Amazon sells them cheap.

http://www.amazon.co...99&sr=8-3-spell

#6 MTB John

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Posted 02 November 2010 - 04:20 AM

If it was not for tightness in my left leg I would be cruising. It has become a lot worse since I left the hospital. I suspect this is because I was using an FES bike three times a week. If you have access to one I highly recommend it. Otherwise, lots of stretching and lots of heat - bath, spa pool, sauna, whatever you can find.

I've had Botox twice in both my calf and Quads but do not feel like it achieved a great deal.
I also take Baclofen and use a clonidine patch. I don't really feel like they help the tone much but if I go off them I get really bad spasm as well as the tone..

A standing frame may help too but you would need to use it a lot..

Hope some of this helps..

J
Out of the gloom a voice said unto me, "Smile and be happy, things could be worse." So I smiled and was happy and behold things did get worse.

#7 benok

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Posted 22 December 2010 - 02:30 PM

Hi guys struggling with the spastic leg, but all the suggestions have been a great help.
Been standing on the walker for about 15 minutes for 3x a day and doing some stretching on bed.
http://ronaldlora.blogspot.com/

If you cannot face your problem,
the problem is your face.

#8 Arry

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 11:08 PM

Passive stretching is a good strategy to manage muscle tightness due to spasticity. Although, different muscle groups can be affected, but those that prone to tightness and shorting are the muscles in the front of the hip, muscle at the back of the knees and the Tendoachillis at the back of the back. As ,have been suggested by other contributor,I will like to add that if the spasticity is severe , you might need to see a neurologist that place you on right medication after assessing your condition.

Cheers

Arry


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