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"turning Bed" Or "lateral Rotation Mattress" Help!




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#1 clariedarie

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 01:19 PM

Hi,
My brother had a brain stem stroke last summer and was completely paralyzed - but all of his sensations are heightened (skin included). Over these six months he has regained the ability to breathe/vocalize and some micro shoulder/finger movement has returned. He cannot reposition any part of his body in bed - even a smidge.

He has been on a low-air-loss mattress while in the hospital and rehab and has been 'turned' at least every two hours with repositioning in between by staff.
.
In order to care for him at home we are looking into 'turning beds' or "lateral rotation" beds.

We have done hundreds of hours of research and can find nothing definitive except sales pitches that these beds prevent pressure ulcers and increase sleep duration (our two goals). In fact most of the research states that EVEN WITH these 'kinetic' beds he would still have to be turned (and his skin be inspected) every two hours. (Overnight 'help' is not in the budget.)

Does anybody have any experience with this type of bed or know of where we might find some definitive answers before we take out a second mortgage to buy one and find out the hard way that we should have gone a different route?

Thanks in advance.
ClarieDarie (Boston Newbie)

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#2 krc

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 07:34 PM

Hi,
My brother had a brain stem stroke last summer and was completely paralyzed - but all of his sensations are heightened (skin included). Over these six months he has regained the ability to breathe/vocalize and some micro shoulder/finger movement has returned. He cannot reposition any part of his body in bed - even a smidge.

He has been on a low-air-loss mattress while in the hospital and rehab and has been 'turned' at least every two hours with repositioning in between by staff.
.
In order to care for him at home we are looking into 'turning beds' or "lateral rotation" beds.

We have done hundreds of hours of research and can find nothing definitive except sales pitches that these beds prevent pressure ulcers and increase sleep duration (our two goals). In fact most of the research states that EVEN WITH these 'kinetic' beds he would still have to be turned (and his skin be inspected) every two hours. (Overnight 'help' is not in the budget.)

Does anybody have any experience with this type of bed or know of where we might find some definitive answers before we take out a second mortgage to buy one and find out the hard way that we should have gone a different route?

Thanks in advance.
ClarieDarie (Boston Newbie)



#3 krc

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 01:34 PM

Dear Clariedarie,
As of today, I am a new member to this site. I hope this came to you in time for your brother's needs.
Two years ago, my 52 year old husband had a truck accident leaving him a quad from a C6 C7 break. While in the hospital the first 3 months, he got 2 pressure soars on both buttocks. They became so bad that he had to have two surgeries/flaps. From that point on, the doctor has prescribed an alternative bed. My husband was on an air bed for the last 2 years and having to be turned every 2 hours interrupting his and my sleep. Due to expensive mechanical problems with the bed, we chose to go with the Pro Bed, just like the one you are researching on in this writing.

We have had this bed for about six weeks now and love it. My husband is in the bed for approximatley 13 hours and his skin is not red. We no longer need to physically turn him. We both get an undisturbed sleep. The way the bed turns manually also saves back injuries on caregivers.

We highly recommend this bed in the prevention of pressure soars, pneumonia, a good nights sleep for the patient and the spouse and fewer injuries on the caregivers. If you have any further questions, please feel free to write me back. I will be more than happy to take the time to answer your questions. We have been working with a man by the name of Brian Bailey at 231-420-6728 at Pro Bed Medical. He demonstrated the bed to us and sold us the bed.

Regards,

krc

#4 McRobb

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 03:00 AM

Hello and welcome to this site on behalf of all of those who watch it regularly. I imagine that you will get some very good answer to your question on this site. I can only tell you what my experience has been, so here goes.

At home, I have a bariatric air bed from Roho. I have had it since my injury and paralysis 7 years ago and I have never had a pressure sore from lying in this bed. This bed has an alternating setting so that different parts of the mattress expand and deflate alternately and this relieves the pressure on the skin. I do not turn or move all night either so it has worked wonderfully for me.

I was in hospital for 2 months last year with a Stage 4 pressure sore caused by cushion in my chair going flat. At the hospital, I had a turning bed but the doctor and nurses still did not trust it to keep sore away so they still turned me every two hours, even though the bed was working properly. I think it probably would have worked well but as I had flap surgery and wound vac on after that, I think they were afraid to rely solely on it.

I was sent home after two months to my air bed and have been down for 18 months on that bed with no pressure sores. I don't know the cost comparison but there may be other options than the turning bed. The alternating pressure air mattress are probably a lot cheaper.

Wishing you well.

#5 Bobo1974

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 11:48 PM

Definitely get it. I live in Connecticut and I called the place I get all my supplies. I had a doctor write a prescription. The script got sent to medicare and medicaid and I am able to rent a mattress pad overlay. It is free. After two years of "renting" it you own it. Medicare and medicaid pay for the monthly rental. You don't want to own it or you will have to pay for it. If you rent it, it is like you own it. Any repairs that need to be done, they exchange it no questions. Its just a mattress pad overlay and not one pressure sore. 13 years and not one. I have an alternating pressure relief pad.
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#6 Leandra

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 04:36 AM

Im curious which bed you choose? Im going thru the same thing right now my other half is coming home soon and he is a c4 c5 complete and Im lost everyones tips really helped :)

#7 krc

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 09:15 PM

We chose the ProBed. We have been working with a man by the name of Brian Bailey at 231-420-6728 at Pro Bed Medical. He demonstrated the bed to us and sold us the bed. My husband of a C6 C7 break has had this bed for about 4 months now and there are no signs of pressure soars. We both are now getting a good nights sleep without all the interruptions. We are 100% satisfied. This bed also cuts down on the caregiver injuries when turning the patient because the caregiver doesn't do the turning. The bed turns the patient.

#8 krc

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 09:23 PM

Im curious which bed you choose? Im going thru the same thing right now my other half is coming home soon and he is a c4 c5 complete and Im lost everyones tips really helped :)





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