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Off Road Handbike In The Uk?




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52 replies to this topic

#1 monkeyman

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 06:25 AM

Hi all,

Has anyone got an off road handbike in the UK?

Either a One-off, Explorer or the new Lasher ATH. I've had a road handbike for some years now and love the freedom and exercise it provides. I'm now looking at possibly purchasing one of the above but would really like the chance to have a look at one in the flesh and if at all possible, try one out.
I know the One-off and explorer are more capable for extreme off-roading but am not sure whether i'd be comfortable in the kneeling, bent over position?
I really don't want to spend alot of money on one only to find it unsuitable!
I'm paralysed from T6 down so not sure if my injury is to high for this kind of bike?

Any advice from anyone with experience (good or bad) with these bikes would be appreciated.

Thanks, Stevie

#2 Maltese Cat

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 07:33 AM

Hi Stevie,

Afraid I can't help on the off road hand bike, but I'm really interested to know about your road one and what advice you can give us! My fiance (Guido) and I are planning to get a kettwiessel trike (well, two actually - a leg one for me and a hand bike for Guido - to hitch together as a tandem), and were wondering what type of road bike you have used, and what you would recommend. We are total novices in the field and so trying to work out where money is best spent. Hoping to go off adventuring on honeymoon and beyond...!

thanks,

The Cat

p.s. suspect guido will be on here shortly asking far more specific questions!
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#3 guido

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 07:48 AM

This guy does some pretty good details and videos. Maybe worth using as a starter?

http://www.theandyca...om/1/Bikes.html

His video on YouTube
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=tfL9wAH8Dyo


Owner videos on One-Off website:
http://www.oneoffhan....com/video.html

Have found handcycling association website curiously devoid of advice, opinions, etc...

And can I refer you to this thread: http://www.apparelyz...005#entry223005
I have a few questions too!!

Posted Image

Edited by guido, 27 April 2011 - 08:02 AM.

  • monkeyman likes this
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#4 monkeyman

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 10:15 AM

Hi Maltese Cat/Guido

Thanks for your responses. As you asked…

I got my Top End XLT Gold handcycle about 5 years ago now and would highly recommend that if you have the chance then get one! (Not necessarily the same make, I’m not trying to promote any particular manufacturer).
Pro’s and cons from my experience:

Pro’s
• Great aerobic exercise
• Fantastic way to get out and about without your chair… I regularly explore Windsor great park/Virginia waters.
• SPEED… downhill with the wind behind me, it absuolutely flys, top speed to date 38mph, when your bum is 5 inches off the ground this feels extremely fast! (Uphill with the wind in ya face is another story… we’ll come to that).

Con’s
• Size - They’re big bits of kit so you need the space to store them… I keep mine indoors in the spare room.
• Expensive… but then what disabled equipment isn’t! I was really worried whether it would be any good for me so took a couple of test rides before I bought, definitely worth doing if you can (hence me asking about off road handcycles on here).
• Turning Circle – as mentioned these things are big and the turning circle is not good. I’d seriously consider this with the tandems you mentioned as I imagine these are enormous and the turning circle will be a real concern. For example I’ve ridden down towpaths and came to a gate which I couldn’t fit through so had to turn around. I normally ride with an able body friend and on a number of occasions they’ve had to lift the back of my bike and pivot me round on the front wheel! Just a point to think about.
• Low riding position – being a recumbent this is obvious and not necessarily a negative, it’s just a little frightening when you have an articulated truck trying to pass you on a narrow road… my advice, ensure you go for a in-ya-face, look-at-me colour (mines a bright orange) to help with visibility. Oh and those little flags, looks a bit silly I agree but I’d rather that then not be seen and get squashed!

Buying advice:I test rode a couple of peoples handcycles (who I meet online), this was invaluable and convinced me I wanted one. I then visited a couple of local wheelchair dealers and found their prices extortionate so finally plumped to import mine from the US. As a handcycle isn’t quite as custom made (size wise) as a wheelchair I felt safe in doing so, especially after speaking with the guys as BikeON.com who were extremely helpful and put my mind at rest (no hard sale, just useful advice)… I would highly recommend them, they also have the model you mentioned for sale there at $6,740, not sure if that’s good or not? You can see it here:

http://bike-on.com/p...ndcycle-618.htm

If you have any other questions, let me know, happy to help if I can.

Again if there’s anyone out there with an off-road handcycle (one off, explorer or Lasher sport) and are willing to let me have a look and ride it would be greatly appreciated.

Stevie

#5 guido

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 08:11 AM

Hi Stevie


- thanks. Interested by the cons. Advantage of Kettwiesel is stands on it's end (bum) for storage, quite a clever feature, takes up a smaller footprint, and has a pretty good turning circle. Think Delta designs are better than Tadpoles for this? But am sure you'd find it REALLY dull after a road racing bike! It really is a tourer.. BUT for a tourer, if you configure as a tandem with front one a handcrank (should be this way around otherwise you can put too much pressure on the handcrank accidentally and the torque might break where it's fixed to the one infront) then it's actually really crap for stowage space. Might look into a trailer eventually, using the wheelchair wheels as the trailer wheels - one less thing to carry and they're designed for minimum resistance.


Have considered buying abroad, but good relationship with closest dealer (who's actually got some pretty sharp pricing) is always a good thing in case of problem. Loyalty can have it's own rewards, and you never need people when things are going well!


Good luck with your decision making. Share the review sites you come across.


Lasher Sport -


Is One Off and Explorer the same thing? http://www.handcycle...om/Off-Road.htm


Guido
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#6 Tetracyclone

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 09:50 AM

Here is my difficult dream. Since I can use a regular AB stationary bike, and since I am an old lady with a problem in my right ulnar nerve, i want both hand and leg cranks.

As best I can imagine this is an unlikely dream because having two cranks would make it a devilishly difficult design, as well as being heavy.

But what about this? Take something like the Cougar Power assist, but put leg crank on it instead of hand crank. Then I could push with hands on my wheelchair rims when leg strength was inadequate.

Feedback?

#7 monkeyman

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 10:06 AM

Hi Guido,

Horses for courses... a tourer is a different machine then my racer but i'm sure you'll have just as much fun :)

As for taking your wheelchair along have a look at these:

http://bike-on.com/p...dies-.-1156.htm

Not sure if they will fit on your tourer but have a look as they are a great idea.

As mentioned before the only major thing to consider is the turning circle, try to plan out your route, i use google maps street view to preview areas i haven't been before... or the overhead satellite view can be OK for off road areas (you can't clearly see the types of gates but can normally see potential problems e.g. fence lines etc).

If you can get a good deal in the UK then go for it... i couldn't and saved over £1400 importing! But this was a while ago so things change.

One-off and Explorer are different beasts:

  • The One-off is american made and was the first of it's kind (as far as i'm aware) to have rear wheel drive.
  • The Explorer (and Explorer II) is from Poland and is the first off road handcycle with suspension. This is a mixed blessing as suspension equals more weight and some loss of power due to flexing while peddling. But downhill it's a great ride... apparently?
Again i'd appreciate any users feedback on these bikes (and the Lasher ATH) and would relish the opportunity to take a short test ride... PLEASE!!

Thanks, Stevie

#8 guido

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 11:32 AM

I have just mentioned this thread to Lasher Sport (@LasherSport & @DisabledGear for any followers) on twitter - we follow each other.


And I given this thread the shortened URL: http://tinyurl.com/handbiking in case anyone wants to forward it on or share on social media to help get more opinions.


Thanks.


Brilliant link, Stevie, thanks. Why don't you email Andy Campbell direct - just say a guy who went on the Back-Up 2005 Swedish Ski Course said you should get in touch!


And I know what you mean about importing costs: I imported a Reck Motomed active/passive bike after a row with the UK distributor, conversations with the manufacturers and the Irish agents (which all took the piss) and including a courier cost of £300 still saved £600. Worth scouting round. But have had a quick look in £, $ and € and they seem pretty evenly matched. Haven't ordered yet, so will do a final check with your suggestion - thanks.



Tetra - god, don't know! I'm beginning to think all things are possible, it's just a matter of how much you are prepared to pay.
There's no reason it can't be done, but it would be simpler, technically, to have both on a front wheel drive, otherwise you're gonna have long chains and more room for fiddly bits that go wrong. Doesn't matter about whether you can use a normal bike or not, but might this be simpler (and more enjoyable) on a Delta design trike? Taiwan is the land of possibility. They're copying our production ideas for a fraction of the cost. I'd start putting it about to companies there and see who'll build you one or alter an existing product.


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#9 Django

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 01:56 PM

Tetra, have you seen the berkelbike? It functions on both arm and leg power like you want..
“If there must be trouble let it be in my day, that my child may have peace.”…Thomas Paine

#10 guido

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 01:58 PM

http://www.berkelbike.com/

Edited by guido, 28 April 2011 - 01:59 PM.

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#11 Lasher Sport

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 06:58 PM

Hi all. I was invited via our Lasher Sport Twitter account to share some information on this thread regarding our Lasher Sport ATH- All Terrain Handcycle.

I am a handcycler and enjoy the sport. A couple years ago, after preparing for a race (the 2009 Sadler's Ultra Challenge) and spending so much time training on the few paved roads and paths that would accommodate a racer, I got to looking at all the great off road trails that my mountain bike friends would ride and wished I could bike along with them. I knew of the One-Off, but it wasn't very comfortable for me personally, and I wasn't looking to get quite as extreme as a One-Off handcycle would allow. Basically, I wanted something comfortable, familiar, with a lot of ground clearance, and that I could ride off road or on road. With that in mind, I designed the ATH. Being a front wheel drive handbike I worried that it wouldn't be able to climb very well, but as it turns out it climbs great. It can't climb straight up the side of a mountain like a One-Off, but it can climb the hills on the kind of trails a mountain bike would ride on, which was the main purpose.

As part of the design, it was important to me to make the ATH as user friendly as possible, so I use as many off-the-shelf mountain bike components as I can. This means that the only component on the ATH that isn't a direct mountain bike part is the crank arms, though they are mostly made from a mountain bike crank. This allows the user to get their bike tuned-up at any bike shop. Also, the bike components on the ATH can be upgraded or changed for any other standard mountain bike component.

I also designed the ATH to be a handcycle 'platform' where the user could also change the wheel sets (or in some cases just the tires). This allows the ATH to accommodate 26" (559) standard mountain bike wheels, 650c road wheels, 700c road wheels, 29er (622) mountain bike wheels, or 4" wide winter wheels... all on the same fork! The front wheel (drive wheel) hub is a standard 135mm (mountain bike width) with a disc brake. Both the parking brake (which is mechanical) and the primary brake (which is hydraulic) are run off the drive wheel disc. So, whenever a user decides to get a second or third wheel set for their ATH, they can pick up or have built any wheel set that uses the standard 135mm disc brake hub... which would be available from any decent mountain bike shop. Switching the drive wheel is easy because the disc rotor would be in the same location for every drive wheel. So changing from a road to an off-road to a snow drive wheel only requires pulling the drive wheel off the fork and sliding the new wheel on. This takes less than 5 minutes total and doesn't require any tools or adjusting. The brakes will be ready to go right away, no matter what drive wheel is installed, the fork is designed to accommodate all the wheel sizes and widths.

The rear wheels can either be threaded single axle bolt on, or quick release (like a wheelchair wheel). If you opt for the quick release style wheels, you can even use your ATH wheels with your everyday chair and vice versa.

The ATH is much faster on pavement than you might expect with an off-road wheel set. I've had it up to 20mph on a paved flat and can cruise along at 14mph with not much difficulty. This of course depends on the particular tread that you choose for the tires. A super knobby off-road tire will be slower than an all-purpose on road/off-road tire. The speed is generally the same once you take the ATH off road as well.

Lashersport-ATH.jpg

You can find a few videos of the ATH in action on our YouTube channel... http://www.youtube.com/Lashersport



The off-road YouTube video doesn't look as challenging as it actually was, so this summer I intend to create a video that better shows it's capabilities.
Or you can watch a video showing several different types of terrain that one of our ATH users in Australia recently made...


You can find some photos of the ATH on our Facebook page... http://www.facebook....202.47034346377 and http://www.facebook....624.47034346377
Or you can Like us on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/LasherSport

Our first ATH user in the UK will be getting his ATH in roughly a month. He has said he'd be happy to show it and let potential users give it a test drive if interested.

I hope I've adequately described the ATH for those who are interested. I'd be happy to answer any questions that you may have about our ATH.

Thank you for the invite to be a part of this thread.

-Bill Lasher
http://www.LasherSport.com/

Edited by Lasher Sport, 28 April 2011 - 07:05 PM.


#12 guido

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 07:06 PM

Thanks, Bill.

Guido (@DisabledGear)
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#13 roo

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 04:44 AM

Hi all. I was invited via our Lasher Sport Twitter account to share some information on this thread regarding our Lasher Sport ATH- All Terrain Handcycle.

I am a handcycler and enjoy the sport. A couple years ago, after preparing for a race (the 2009 Sadler's Ultra Challenge) and spending so much time training on the few paved roads and paths that would accommodate a racer, I got to looking at all the great off road trails that my mountain bike friends would ride and wished I could bike along with them. I knew of the One-Off, but it wasn't very comfortable for me personally, and I wasn't looking to get quite as extreme as a One-Off handcycle would allow. Basically, I wanted something comfortable, familiar, with a lot of ground clearance, and that I could ride off road or on road. With that in mind, I designed the ATH. Being a front wheel drive handbike I worried that it wouldn't be able to climb very well, but as it turns out it climbs great. It can't climb straight up the side of a mountain like a One-Off, but it can climb the hills on the kind of trails a mountain bike would ride on, which was the main purpose.

As part of the design, it was important to me to make the ATH as user friendly as possible, so I use as many off-the-shelf mountain bike components as I can. This means that the only component on the ATH that isn't a direct mountain bike part is the crank arms, though they are mostly made from a mountain bike crank. This allows the user to get their bike tuned-up at any bike shop. Also, the bike components on the ATH can be upgraded or changed for any other standard mountain bike component.

I also designed the ATH to be a handcycle 'platform' where the user could also change the wheel sets (or in some cases just the tires). This allows the ATH to accommodate 26" (559) standard mountain bike wheels, 650c road wheels, 700c road wheels, 29er (622) mountain bike wheels, or 4" wide winter wheels... all on the same fork! The front wheel (drive wheel) hub is a standard 135mm (mountain bike width) with a disc brake. Both the parking brake (which is mechanical) and the primary brake (which is hydraulic) are run off the drive wheel disc. So, whenever a user decides to get a second or third wheel set for their ATH, they can pick up or have built any wheel set that uses the standard 135mm disc brake hub... which would be available from any decent mountain bike shop. Switching the drive wheel is easy because the disc rotor would be in the same location for every drive wheel. So changing from a road to an off-road to a snow drive wheel only requires pulling the drive wheel off the fork and sliding the new wheel on. This takes less than 5 minutes total and doesn't require any tools or adjusting. The brakes will be ready to go right away, no matter what drive wheel is installed, the fork is designed to accommodate all the wheel sizes and widths.

The rear wheels can either be threaded single axle bolt on, or quick release (like a wheelchair wheel). If you opt for the quick release style wheels, you can even use your ATH wheels with your everyday chair and vice versa.

The ATH is much faster on pavement than you might expect with an off-road wheel set. I've had it up to 20mph on a paved flat and can cruise along at 14mph with not much difficulty. This of course depends on the particular tread that you choose for the tires. A super knobby off-road tire will be slower than an all-purpose on road/off-road tire. The speed is generally the same once you take the ATH off road as well.

Lashersport-ATH.jpg

You can find a few videos of the ATH in action on our YouTube channel... http://www.youtube.com/Lashersport
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=4170Eh4pDug
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=OAGYs4qhcDQ

The off-road YouTube video doesn't look as challenging as it actually was, so this summer I intend to create a video that better shows it's capabilities.
Or you can watch a video showing several different types of terrain that one of our ATH users in Australia recently made...
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=gzxo7Oj4GEY

You can find some photos of the ATH on our Facebook page... http://www.facebook....202.47034346377 and http://www.facebook....624.47034346377
Or you can Like us on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/LasherSport

Our first ATH user in the UK will be getting his ATH in roughly a month. He has said he'd be happy to show it and let potential users give it a test drive if interested.

I hope I've adequately described the ATH for those who are interested. I'd be happy to answer any questions that you may have about our ATH.

Thank you for the invite to be a part of this thread.

-Bill Lasher
http://www.LasherSport.com/



thanks bill for posting the info am also a keen hand-cycle user and looking to get a new 1 this year i cycle around hungary and its very flat ,with cycle paths also but when i go through the winerys it get a bit ruff i think this 1 will do the job for me i will concat you soon for more info once i hve looked at your videos .happy cycleing and thanks again
Roo {sunnyrothvillas}

Edited by roo, 29 April 2011 - 04:45 AM.

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http://www.sunnyrothvillas.com email info@sunnyrothvillas.com


#14 Tetracyclone

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 12:44 PM

Tetra, have you seen the berkelbike? It functions on both arm and leg power like you want..

Oh thank you thank you thank you! At least i know it is possible, though getting to the Netherlands for a fitting is going to be difficult.

Guido, yes, Taiwan is the land of bike parts, but getting someone to piece together a copy of the Berkelbike...

It is a finely engineered vehicle and it would take a copycat six months to get it balanced acceptably. But I can still put the word out.

#15 araitn

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 03:57 PM

Hi all. I was invited via our Lasher Sport Twitter account to share some information on this thread regarding our Lasher Sport ATH- All Terrain Handcycle.

Hey Bill, it's great to see you on Apparelyzed!

I can vouch for the quality of Lasher Sport products. I've been using a Lasher Sport BT-Mg-AS as my everyday chair for the last two years. I literally bought it out from under Bill at an Abilities Expo in Chicago. I tried out a few of his demo chairs and then he said that it looked like his personal chair would fit me pretty good and would I like to take it for a spin? I rolled around in it for a short time and I was very impressed. We talked about measuring me for a new chair but, after much discussion, he agreed to sell me his chair. It's been a great chair without any problems.

IMG_3186.JPG
(I'll throw a plug in here for Guido. I'm sporting the jeans I purchased from him at Disabled Gear in these photos.)
IMG_3184-1.JPG

I've been planning on buying an ATH since he begain building them but, due to a lot of health issues and other time consuming events, I've yet to order one.

I also have experience with the One-off handcycle. I've owned one for almost two years. To be honest though, I've only ridden it four or five times. I have constant, severe burning pain in my left thigh and the One-off riding position increases my pain during and after the ride. I have a few online friends that own the One-off and they ride the hell out of them. It is a beast for serious off-roading. I can climb the steepest of slopes using just one hand on the crank due to the twenty some gears (can't currently recall the exact number) and the mountain drive. However, I've now resigned to the fact that I'll be selling my One-off. I'm interested in the Lasher ATH because of it's off-road capabilities combined with a more comfortable riding position.

IMG_0369.JPG

Again, welcome to the site Bill. There are other threads about wheelchairs that you might be interested in responding to, if you have time, because I know you're busy cranking out those Lasher chairs and cycles.

Joe

#16 guido

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 04:57 PM

Excellent - I knew there were people on here who could add useful opinions to this thread! Thanks Joe (and for the jeans mention).


I have emailed One-Off asking for them to contribute - if anyone here knows them or other handbike manufacturers, ask them along.


The shortened & easy to remember URL for this thread is http://tinyurl.com/handbiking

ATH looks pretty cool - why didn't I find it on my websearches of handbiking???
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#17 roo

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 07:59 PM


Hi all. I was invited via our Lasher Sport Twitter account to share some information on this thread regarding our Lasher Sport ATH- All Terrain Handcycle.

Hey Bill, it's great to see you on Apparelyzed!

I can vouch for the quality of Lasher Sport products. I've been using a Lasher Sport BT-Mg-AS as my everyday chair for the last two years. I literally bought it out from under Bill at an Abilities Expo in Chicago. I tried out a few of his demo chairs and then he said that it looked like his personal chair would fit me pretty good and would I like to take it for a spin? I rolled around in it for a short time and I was very impressed. We talked about measuring me for a new chair but, after much discussion, he agreed to sell me his chair. It's been a great chair without any problems.

IMG_3186.JPG
(I'll throw a plug in here for Guido. I'm sporting the jeans I purchased from him at Disabled Gear in these photos.)
IMG_3184-1.JPG

I've been planning on buying an ATH since he begain building them but, due to a lot of health issues and other time consuming events, I've yet to order one.

I also have experience with the One-off handcycle. I've owned one for almost two years. To be honest though, I've only ridden it four or five times. I have constant, severe burning pain in my left thigh and the One-off riding position increases my pain during and after the ride. I have a few online friends that own the One-off and they ride the hell out of them. It is a beast for serious off-roading. I can climb the steepest of slopes using just one hand on the crank due to the twenty some gears (can't currently recall the exact number) and the mountain drive. However, I've now resigned to the fact that I'll be selling my One-off. I'm interested in the Lasher ATH because of it's off-road capabilities combined with a more comfortable riding position.

IMG_0369.JPG

Again, welcome to the site Bill. There are other threads about wheelchairs that you might be interested in responding to, if you have time, because I know you're busy cranking out those Lasher chairs and cycles.

Joe



nice cycle,,, question is your chest supported on this cycle car'nt tell proper on photo,,why am asking is that am also looking around for my next cycle also and am a t3 complete and if i was in that position my face would be dragging up the road ,and how do you find it after a cycle with your knees in that position thanks for posting the photo and look forward to your reply
ROO

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#18 monkeyman

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 08:26 AM

Hi Bill,

Many thanks for your input. I've read all the info i can find on the Lasher ATH but it's great to hear your reason for development and experience.

Hi Joe,

Very interested to hear your experience with the One-off. My fears are that the seating position could be too extreme for some users, me included, but would still love the chance to try one. It seems a extremely capable climbing machine but for a more general purpose off road ride i think the Lasher ATH is better suited??? I just wish i could ride these bikes so i could really know which one is suitable for me!

Great thread, keep the info coming.

Cheers, Stevie

#19 monkeyman

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 09:49 AM


Tetra, have you seen the berkelbike? It functions on both arm and leg power like you want..

Oh thank you thank you thank you! At least i know it is possible, though getting to the Netherlands for a fitting is going to be difficult.

Guido, yes, Taiwan is the land of bike parts, but getting someone to piece together a copy of the Berkelbike...

It is a finely engineered vehicle and it would take a copycat six months to get it balanced acceptably. But I can still put the word out.


Hi Tetra,

More info here, they ship worldwide and very helpful too.

http://bike-on.com/p...ke-pro-1298.htm

Stevie

#20 araitn

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 03:07 PM

Hey Roo, there is a chest support on the One-off. It doubles as a steering mechanism when you are using the hand cranks going uphill. When you lean your upper body against the chest support the bike will turn in that direction allowing you to steer without taking your hands off the crank. This assumes your injury allows you to have such control. When going downhill, the higher located handle bars are used for steering and include the brake levers for each front disc brake. When making tight, uphill turns, a combination method of steering is necessary. This is accomplished by cranking with one hand and steering with the other.

I hope these pictures will better illustrate the chest support and steering mechanisms.

IMG_0365.JPG
IMG_0368.JPG

Hello MonkeyMan, the riding position looks more extreme than it feels. I've never noticed my knees hurting after riding the One-off, there is a lot of padding in the knee buckets. As mentioned before, it does increase the neuro pain in my thigh. It could also use a little more padding on the chest support and I know of other users that have added padding and are happy with the results. The trick is getting on and off the bike, which was very difficult at first but, became easier with each attempt.

#21 johncarter1973

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 06:28 AM

Hi Steve

I have purchased in early January a Lasher ATH hand cycle and I have no regrets whatsoever.I also took a look at the One Off but it looked really uncomfortable for myself and I think that I wouldn't be riding as much due to that fact.
You have the same injury level as myself and I think that the One Off is better suited for lower paras,in saying that I know a guy over here who is a lower para with a One Off who now regrets buying one due to the fact that is isn't comfortable.

After reading other posts from Bill at Lasher Sport I believe there will be on in the UK soon.Take a look at the bike and try it out,you won't regret it.
I have put a couple of videos up on you tube if you would like to take a look .

Being a guy from Birmingham ,UK but now living in Melbourne Australia I think for the average UK ride this bike will be a great aquisition,the bike is really comfortable and easy to get on and off too.

Regards

John




Hi all,

Has anyone got an off road handbike in the UK?

Either a One-off, Explorer or the new Lasher ATH. I've had a road handbike for some years now and love the freedom and exercise it provides. I'm now looking at possibly purchasing one of the above but would really like the chance to have a look at one in the flesh and if at all possible, try one out.
I know the One-off and explorer are more capable for extreme off-roading but am not sure whether i'd be comfortable in the kneeling, bent over position?
I really don't want to spend alot of money on one only to find it unsuitable!
I'm paralysed from T6 down so not sure if my injury is to high for this kind of bike?

Any advice from anyone with experience (good or bad) with these bikes would be appreciated.

Thanks, Stevie



#22 roo

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 06:56 AM

Hey Roo, there is a chest support on the One-off. It doubles as a steering mechanism when you are using the hand cranks going uphill. When you lean your upper body against the chest support the bike will turn in that direction allowing you to steer without taking your hands off the crank. This assumes your injury allows you to have such control. When going downhill, the higher located handle bars are used for steering and include the brake levers for each front disc brake. When making tight, uphill turns, a combination method of steering is necessary. This is accomplished by cranking with one hand and steering with the other.

I hope these pictures will better illustrate the chest support and steering mechanisms.

IMG_0365.JPG
IMG_0368.JPG

Hello MonkeyMan, the riding position looks more extreme than it feels. I've never noticed my knees hurting after riding the One-off, there is a lot of padding in the knee buckets. As mentioned before, it does increase the neuro pain in my thigh. It could also use a little more padding on the chest support and I know of other users that have added padding and are happy with the results. The trick is getting on and off the bike, which was very difficult at first but, became easier with each attempt.


cheers joe for the reply i think this hand-cycle would not suit us with my injury level being high and would be concerned about my knees in that position happy cycling and take care
Roo

ROO'S WHEELCHAIR FRIENDLY VILLAS.
http://www.sunnyrothvillas.com email info@sunnyrothvillas.com


#23 roo

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 07:14 AM

thanks bill video's are great this is what am looking for .
:specool: Roo

ROO'S WHEELCHAIR FRIENDLY VILLAS.
http://www.sunnyrothvillas.com email info@sunnyrothvillas.com


#24 monkeyman

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 07:25 AM

Hi John,

Thanks for your response and insight.

Great video and spectacular scenery... i noticed you have a front fender on your bike, i'm considering this as i've experience getting sprayed in the face with mud/oil from the front wheel of my roadbike, not pleasent! Hope you don't mind me asking but what are the specs of your bike, what options did you go for, are there any options you wish you got (or wish you didn't get?). Also do you have any pics of your bike as i'd love to see it if poss?
One final question - how long did it take from ordering to delivery?

Many thanks, Stevie


Hi Steve

I have purchased in early January a Lasher ATH hand cycle and I have no regrets whatsoever.I also took a look at the One Off but it looked really uncomfortable for myself and I think that I wouldn't be riding as much due to that fact.
You have the same injury level as myself and I think that the One Off is better suited for lower paras,in saying that I know a guy over here who is a lower para with a One Off who now regrets buying one due to the fact that is isn't comfortable.

After reading other posts from Bill at Lasher Sport I believe there will be on in the UK soon.Take a look at the bike and try it out,you won't regret it.
I have put a couple of videos up on you tube if you would like to take a look .

Being a guy from Birmingham ,UK but now living in Melbourne Australia I think for the average UK ride this bike will be a great aquisition,the bike is really comfortable and easy to get on and off too.

Regards

John



#25 Lasher Sport

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 10:02 PM

I'll try to keep this post a little shorter than my last marathon post...

@roo- I'd be happy to answer any questions you have. Feel free to e-mail me at lasher@lashersport.com or I can respond to any of your questions in this post if you feel that others might have the same questions.

@araitn- Yes, I do remember you... and that chair. I'm very pleased that it's working well for you. You have done a great job of keeping the frame finish looking new. I'll check out the other postings and see what I can respond to, but you're right, I'm feverishly working on customer chairs and handbikes. Customers first!

@guido- I'm not sure why the ATH wouldn't come up when searching for handbike. I'll have to fix that!

@johncarter1973- Your ATH cycling videos make me want to visit Australia. Well, Australia has always been on my places to visit list, but now I want to ride the trails in Australia too. You live in a beautiful place.

@monkeyman- To answer a question that you posed to john, the front fender is a quick release fender that we use for the front wheel. It's an off-the-shelf fender that I discovered that works well for the drive wheel. Since it's quick-release, it can be easily removed. My goal has always been to make the ATH compatible with off-the-shelf mountain bike components, so we use tubing sizes that are compatible with the MTB stuff.

We are about to send the latest batch of ATHs to powder. I'll post pics on our Facebook page when we get them assembled and ready to ship. I'll also post pics of the ATH in the road setup with 650c road wheels, and in 29er mode with the Spinergy 29er wheel set.

Current delivery time is approximately 8 weeks from the time of order, but we do our best to get them done sooner since I know people are hungry to get out and ride.

-Bill

#26 monkeyman

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 07:10 AM

Hi Bill,

Thanks for the info.
I love the look of the Matte black finish on one of the bikes i saw. How hard wearing is it, with no protective gloss is it as hard wearing as other finishes? On that note what is the most hard wearing/scrath resistant finish? If i do go for one of these bikes it's gonna go through some rough stuff but obviously i want to keep it looking as good as possible to, so a good strong finish is a must IMO.

I think using standard MTB components is a very wise choice too, keeps costs down and makes sourcing replacement parts far easier. Do you have any pics of a bike with the front fender attached... personally i hate the look of fenders on bikes BUT i think it's an essential when riding very muddy trails as you sit directly in front of the drive wheel, you're bound to get it straight in the face! I'd be interested to see what it looks like (good to hear it's removable so i can take it off for drier conditions).

I follow your facebook page so will be waiting in anticipation for the promised pics!

Thanks, Stevie

@monkeyman- To answer a question that you posed to john, the front fender is a quick release fender that we use for the front wheel. It's an off-the-shelf fender that I discovered that works well for the drive wheel. Since it's quick-release, it can be easily removed. My goal has always been to make the ATH compatible with off-the-shelf mountain bike components, so we use tubing sizes that are compatible with the MTB stuff.

We are about to send the latest batch of ATHs to powder. I'll post pics on our Facebook page when we get them assembled and ready to ship. I'll also post pics of the ATH in the road setup with 650c road wheels, and in 29er mode with the Spinergy 29er wheel set.

Current delivery time is approximately 8 weeks from the time of order, but we do our best to get them done sooner since I know people are hungry to get out and ride.

-Bill



#27 johncarter1973

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 08:25 AM

Hi Steve

When it comes tp ordering your specs you really don't need to worry too much, I skyped with Bill and we went through it all over the phone,all you
need to know are a few measurements i.e height,inside leg,reach,shoulder width etc.Bill was great,I too was a little unsure as to what I needed as I hadn't used a handcycle before but we went through the entire ordering form and Bill then gave good advice without pushing just to get the most out of the sale,it was informative to say the least,I cannot fault the process really.
I did choose to go for the rear storage bag,essential bit of kit I think, in goes the phone,wallet,keys and my young daughter when she cannot be bothered to walk!
I also got the camera for my helmet,the only thing I wish that I had purchased was the cygolite headlight,I thought that I wouldn't need it but where I live it gets pitch black as there is a lack of street lights.
I have attached a pic of my bike with the mudguard on,it was taken in the workshop of Lasher Sport just before shipping,if you are going offroad you have to have one after all as a Brummie myself it tends to rain a lot in England which does create heaps of the brown stuff.

Regards

JohnCarter-handcycle.jpg


Hi John,

Thanks for your response and insight.

Great video and spectacular scenery... i noticed you have a front fender on your bike, i'm considering this as i've experience getting sprayed in the face with mud/oil from the front wheel of my roadbike, not pleasent! Hope you don't mind me asking but what are the specs of your bike, what options did you go for, are there any options you wish you got (or wish you didn't get?). Also do you have any pics of your bike as i'd love to see it if poss?
One final question - how long did it take from ordering to delivery?

Many thanks, Stevie



Hi Steve

I have purchased in early January a Lasher ATH hand cycle and I have no regrets whatsoever.I also took a look at the One Off but it looked really uncomfortable for myself and I think that I wouldn't be riding as much due to that fact.
You have the same injury level as myself and I think that the One Off is better suited for lower paras,in saying that I know a guy over here who is a lower para with a One Off who now regrets buying one due to the fact that is isn't comfortable.

After reading other posts from Bill at Lasher Sport I believe there will be on in the UK soon.Take a look at the bike and try it out,you won't regret it.
I have put a couple of videos up on you tube if you would like to take a look .

Being a guy from Birmingham ,UK but now living in Melbourne Australia I think for the average UK ride this bike will be a great aquisition,the bike is really comfortable and easy to get on and off too.

Regards

John



#28 monkeyman

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 06:49 AM

Update...

After exchanging numerous emails with Bill (thanks for his time, patience and expertise) at Lasher Sports i finally pinned down the spec for my bike and placed an order last weekend!
I considered the One-Off but felt it was a little extreme for my needs. I'm planning to use my bike on the road as well and just wouldn't feel safe in the head down cranking postion that the One-Off provides. There's no doubt it's a excellent climbing machine and if money was no limit i'd have both!

Anyway...

Roughly 6 weeks delivery although i know the Lasher Sports team are working hard to get it to me ASAP. Once i recieve it i'm happy to demo to other prospective customers if there's anyone else in the UK interested? I already have a couple of guys wanting to check it out but if anyone else would like to please let me know! I'll make an official announcement when i take delivery... i cannot wait to get out on it exploring this Summer!!!

Cheers, Stevie

#29 guido

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 06:53 AM

Good one, Stevie! I should also say that we ordered the Hase Kettwiesel Recumbent Trikes (one normal, one with handcrank - can be joined as tandem). We're going to use it for leisurely touring,. Will also feedback after delivery and use. Will say that London Recumbents were excellent - if a little mad!!!
for UK residents - DisabledGear.com - the FREE-Ads website for 2nd hand disability equipment.

#30 Tetracyclone

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 11:46 AM

Congratulations to both of you.


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