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Para And Quad Must Haves!

accessible homes



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50 replies to this topic

#1 tomsov

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 03:39 AM

Looking to get a project off the ground. Specifically a home design company that specializes in making homes accessible and practical for living with a disability. Both the owner and I are both paralyzed and we only know so much. Looking to see what makes you feel comfortable in your house. Send pics Ideas Integration Ideas products. We are looking for adapting homes to all extremes when needed. Looking for primarily must haves for Electrical integration and products of that nature but any ideas or products that you use, seen or want to see would be awesome. Send pictures or diagrams or anything involving making a house practical for someone in a chair or crutches or whatever. Thanks. This would help me out a ton.
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#2 brockit79

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 08:29 AM

wider doors and corridors, height adjustable work surfaces for folks in chairs and ab folk, lower plug sockets and switches, some people i know have tracks fitted for electric hoist, ample sized bathrooms which allow for getting on to the toilet ot having a shower chair to be stored along with the basin, loo and shower/bath, I'd like to have a bath so solutions to that are bath lifts, ramps to outside, accessible washing line, grow pots for the garden which are nice and accessible for folks in chairs, absolute wish list would be a hot tub in the garden.

You probably know all of these, sorry if I'm teaching my grandma to suck eggs.

I hope it helps

Edited by brockit79, 16 March 2012 - 08:30 AM.

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Neek me chawa, wermo, mo killie ma klounkee!

#3 ClaraTaylor

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 11:49 AM

What about electric "control pads" - Scribs showed me his once that operates lights around the house, closes / opens curtains / opens the front door.
A "panic" alarm button that can be built in somewhere would be useful for some independent people should they get into trouble (i.e. fall out of their chair / be taken ill)...

#4 Trinity

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 12:07 PM

lower plug sockets


I would love my plug sockets higher, less bending down to plug things in and less trailing cables! Also think about how many plugs sockets you may need, then double it or even triple it! You can never have too many

A hot tub in the garden sounds fabulous! Also undercover parking for those wet days for getting in and out car, centrally controlled entertainment and climate controls, low rails in a closet or wardrobe

ooh and speakers in the bathroom (dancin_johnny has this) next time I get a new bathroom or house thats top of my list, we spend a reasonable amount of time in the bathroom and being able to listen to music is great to pass the time! Bathrooms should be wet rooms, if you search on the forum Russ1 has posted a picture of his bathroom before, it is amazing!

I am sure there is plenty more, I would love to be able to design and build my own home from scratch!

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#5 brockit79

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 12:31 PM

lower plug sockets


I would love my plug sockets higher, less bending down to plug things in and less trailing cables! Also think about how many plugs sockets you may need, then double it or even triple it! You can never have too many


oops I meant lower switches and higher sockets

lower plug sockets


ooh and speakers in the bathroom (dancin_johnny has this) next time I get a new bathroom or house thats top of my list, we spend a reasonable amount of time in the bathroom and being able to listen to music is great to pass the time! Bathrooms should be wet rooms, if you search on the forum Russ1 has posted a picture of his bathroom before, it is amazing!

I am sure there is plenty more, I would love to be able to design and build my own home from scratch!


same deffo re the sound system in the bathroom and designing home from scratch!
Neek me chawa, wermo, mo killie ma klounkee!

#6 Cathelena

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 03:46 PM

Would love to get electric blinds for windows

#7 Wobbly

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 04:10 PM

Here's my wish list ;
Raised washer and dryer so you can load and unload at height without bending, ditto plug sockets, ditto ovens, astro turf grass, super cushioned stairs for when i fall!

Children that pick up up after themselves - oops i've gone off topic now ;-)
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#8 tsh3406

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 05:18 PM

I'd like to see big roll-in/walk-in showers with built in seating and multiple heads, and a large easily accessible tub in the master bedroon. The kitchen is my second favorite room, ovens, refridgerators and freezers could definitly be more user friendly. Also some creative ramps in split-level floorplans. And a personal opinion, I want a deck with a stone bbq pit and a pair of voice activated skeet throwers, lol....

#9 Ches

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 06:07 PM

Front load, washer/dryers.. and the 3 door frig/freezer have been great buys.
I also got a couch custom made to my chair height. Cost the same as a regular couch. CoolSofa.com

For most para's I dont think a ton of medical equipment is necessarily the answer.. just a solid functional design. You couldnt tell my house was adapted for a wheelchair user unless u knew me personally.

Quads may require a bit of equipment here and there.. but with a control like the ipad who is going to think it's anything less than cool?!

One of my most favorite things just came to mind.. the remote control I have for my fan/light.. I can still remember the days of forgetting to turn the light off, after getting in bed.. NEVER AGAIN!

Here's my wish list ;
Raised washer and dryer so you can load and unload at height without bending, ditto plug sockets, ditto ovens, astro turf grass, super cushioned stairs for when i fall!

Children that pick up up after themselves - oops i've gone off topic now ;-)


If you have the front load washers, you can easily get one those storage boxes that go underneath. I guess it just depends how much height you desire. For me, with the boxes underneath I wasnt able to see the soap drawer or utilize the space on top of the appliances very well.
Our Handicaps Exist Only In the Mind

#10 nomis

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 10:36 PM

More effort needs to go into energy saving flow through the house, avoid having to turn corners or to have to turn back for something. I want to rise in the morning, glide effortlessly into the bathroom, emerge clean into the kitchen for breakfast and be sitting down to breakfast without retracing my path. Keep walls to a minimum; don't even consider split level; seamless door ledges with sunken/grated (fine mesh) channelling. I want to be able to carry a cup of coffee around and in-and-out of the house without spilling it.

In the kitchen, while I want everything at bench height I also want windows low enough to properly see out. What about a kitchen bench/sink that could be raised and lowered so it suits me but can easily be reset for other members of the house.
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"We are all different - but we share the same human spirit. Perhaps it's human nature that we adapt - and survive." - Stephen Hawking 2013


#11 edlee

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 11:33 PM

The idea about the windows struck me. My kitchen window, over my sink ( I built the hose 35 years ago, before SCI) is impossable for me to see out of. Irritating when the wife says "look at that" and points at something.

If you are refitting existing structures,,, an intercom to the entry doors,, including video,, would be a help,, along with a mechanism to unlock or open the door remotely.
ed
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#12 richo

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 05:33 AM

wide passage ways,at least 900mm wide doors,bathrooms can never be too big[with speakers] no lips on any doorway,no shower bases just fall concreat to one large drain in shower,dont even have a curtin in shower just open,lounge and kitchen one massave room,large wheel in pantry,remote entry doors,remote blinds,main bedroom can never be to big,gas hot water that never runs out,gas heating,refigerated cooling,no steps any where this is your
home should be abel to exese anywhere,and finely a shit hot sound system,and chuck in some LOVE.PS if any needs some building tips i would be happy too help if can,because not only am i extreamly good looking i was a builder also....LOL

Edited by richo, 20 March 2012 - 05:40 AM.


#13 tsh3406

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 11:08 AM

Damn, Richo, that was pretty suave`... lol

#14 Speed

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 02:21 PM

When I bought my home and made it accessible the bathrooms were long and narrow and really jsut didnt work. So I gutted the master and redid it with a roll/walk in shower and a pedestal sink
Posted Image
It has a body spray, a rain shower and a hand held. Plus a bench so I can transfer from chair to bench or its big enough to stay in the chair while showering.
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#15 qbounce

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 03:03 PM

I saw a kitchen with upper cabinet shelves that lowered down by an arm lever (like those old slot machines), allowing full access to all kitchen cabinets.
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#16 cripplechick73

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 05:44 PM

I lived in an apartment many years ago that had sloped sinks: shallow in front and deep in back to allow for easily rolling under while still keeping them low. Haven't seen them anywhere since but they were fantastic.
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#17 ebeth

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 02:59 AM

There have been a lot of good suggestions so far. Here are some of my own.

One thing I like about my oven is that the door doesn't swing down. Instead it swings to the side, like a microwave.
Also, my sink isn't as deep as traditional ones It alows knee space when I'm washing dishes
Also, put the thermostat and breaker box within reach
I also put a lot of extra storage in the bathroom for all my medical supplies.
Also, make sure that there is NO height difference between different types of flooring.
For your windows, make sure they can be locked closed when seated.
If you're getting a deck, don't make it out of wood because it's bumpy and uneven. Mine is made of concrete and I love it. It's also easy to maintain.
I also put individual heaters in some rooms (bedroom, bathroom) so that if I'm really cold, I can warm up one room (instead of the whole house) to get myself warm again. I couldn't live without the one in the bathroom, It's so nice to take a shower in a warm room. (I guess that depends what climate you live in.)
In general, make all rooms larger. For example, my dining room is large enough that I can wheel around the table with ease.
Another thing I did was put in shelving that can be reached while in bed. It's amazing what I all need when I'm too lazy to get out of bed to get it. I also installed a light switch for the main bedroom light near the bed.
As an emergency exit, I put an exterior door in my bedroom which leads to an accessible sidewalk. I'm not going to be able to exit through the window, right?
Where I live, the building code states that the garage has to be lower than the house (to reduce carbon monoxide from entering the house.) There was no way I was going to have a ramp, so I have the house and garage at the same level and installed a button operated automatic door between the house and garage. This was an acceptable adaption. (The door came with a remote opener which is nice for letting the cat in.)
In your garage, make sure you have enough room to completely open car doors/van lift, etc.
In your kitchen, for storage lower down, install lots of drawers. It's so much easier to get stuff out of them instead of from cupboards. If you don't want drawers, invest in good quality roll out shelves.
I also have a section of countertop that's been lowered and with nothing underneath for knee space.
For people with reduced finger use, put in accessible taps and handles in the kitchen.
In order to close doors, I added pull handles near the hinge side of the doors. That way I can pull them closed without being in the way of the swinging door. This includes all interior and exterior doors.

Hope this helps!
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#18 Irish Wheelz

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:01 PM

Maybe padding on the corners of a wall. I know most or some of us have chipped away at the corners of walls.

Edited by Irish Wheelz, 21 March 2012 - 05:04 PM.

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#19 ebeth

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 12:22 AM

When my house was built, I had a layer of plywood installed under the layer of drywall in the bathroom on the walls where I knew I wanted grab bars. That allowed me to put my grab bars anywhere without worrying about where the studs are.
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#20 richo

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 12:34 AM

Maybe padding on the corners of a wall. I know most or some of us have chipped away at the corners of walls.

ha ha thats funny should see my hallway looks like a bomb went off
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#21 Doug

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 04:28 PM

clear plastic corner guards work wonders in my house for the walls but the poor door ways have been taking some serious licks.

#22 tomsov

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 02:01 AM

The consensus that I read is flow issues with emphasis on the bathroom and Kitchens. In the US there are no guidelines for residential homes. Just suggestions fallowing ADA standard to new public construction. Is there anyone in an older house utilizing lath and plaster walls? How does that hold up to the beating of the wheelchair? I only ask because it is a harder material then drywall. I also notice that integration of blinds, lights and atmospheric conditions seem to be a big issue. To the power chair users, what are the options in incorporating the remote control features into the controls of the power chair? The only reason I ask is if there is a way to incorporate the signal to a "Universal Remote", that is used for the whole house. I am also wondering what the thought of interior ramps are. Thresholds are an issue but removing stairs all together utilizing only ramps. You loose room space but gain the capability of the second floor possibly. As for the things like grab bars, and angled vanities or sink cabinets do you accept the "sterile" design features that are readily available or are you researching for designer products instead? Beyond what is absolutely needed what are the splurges that you would want to spend your money on?

#23 hundrei

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 03:18 PM

nice.....i'm looking for a mouse i can right/left click without finger function.
help pls

#24 St. Peter

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 04:22 PM

@ hundrei you can use a trackball mouse :

http://www.amazon.co...trackball mouse
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#25 wheeliebear75

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 08:55 AM

Rounded counter tops & cabinettes, thermostat that can make different rooms different temps.....I'm almost always cold while everyone else is roasting, sloped sinks with some leg room under them. I think the others pretty much covered my other big recomends.
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#26 TJT

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 02:51 PM

Looking to get a project off the ground. Specifically a home design company that specializes in making homes accessible and practical for living with a disability. Both the owner and I are both paralyzed and we only know so much. Looking to see what makes you feel comfortable in your house. Send pics Ideas Integration Ideas products. We are looking for adapting homes to all extremes when needed. Looking for primarily must haves for Electrical integration and products of that nature but any ideas or products that you use, seen or want to see would be awesome. Send pictures or diagrams or anything involving making a house practical for someone in a chair or crutches or whatever. Thanks. This would help me out a ton.


Hi everyone,

I missed this posting as I was to busy renovating my condo. The city newspapers came and made videos that shows a lot of the features others have discussed. Also if you google my name there are links to other videos of the place showing more features. The CPA (Canadian Paraplegic Association) recently made a video that should be posted sometime soon. The reno was fun, aggravating but a great asset. i learned a lot. View it at www.edmontonjournal.com/news/Video+Quadriplegic.../story.html

#27 Daisyduke

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 08:07 AM

Hi I love this and hope I can help. I had my closet built along my wall instead of an enclosed closet. It can hold most of my care and linen etc. Each drawer has a open slot for me to stick my hand through and pull it open.

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#28 darlagee22

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Posted 22 September 2012 - 09:00 PM

We have a lot of our lights, home alarm and our thermostat controls on a system that uses a remote control to operate. Then we got an app on our iphones so I can always operate the thermostat and the main lights wherever I am in the house because I always have my phone on my wheelchair or next to me in bed. The app is HAI OmniPro. Its also great because if we turn down the heat while we are on a trip, we can raise the heat before we get home.

Pocket doors on our wide bathroom doors are great too
.
Design the kitchen so there are more lower cabinets than high and instead of a pantry you enter, fill the space with deep, sturdy, pull out drawers and some shelves with some space on the side for long handled brooms, etc. Absolute necesssity- I have 3 nice cutting boards that pull out that I use for counter space that I can get my knees under.
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#29 Christoff31

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 01:03 PM

Bigger bathrooms. More room for gym equipment built in TVs and iPod/iPhone docking stations then speakers around the home deffiantly more sockets and in the right place

#30 Dovely

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 06:29 PM

Bathtubs with wider sides so you can transfer on the side of it first and then transfer onto a lifter.



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This website is a way for those with spinal cord injuries and cauda equina syndrome to share experiences and advice. Any medical matters, treatments or alternative therapies discussed on this website should be thoroughly reviewed by a medical professional or therapist before being acted upon. Under no circumstances should you alter prescribed medication or a medical care plan without consulting your doctor or care plan supervisor first.