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Paraplegics Walk Again




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#1 bslandge

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:25 PM

 



#2 Tetracyclone

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 08:26 PM

These have been around for several years now from several providers.  Leave it to Fox News to use the story as a flag for its anti-government propaganda.  :doh:


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#3 D. Smith

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 09:23 PM

Regardless of the government mention (which I do have concerns with how the new healthcare law is going to effect everything but that is not a discussion for here) I do fear insurance would not cover any part such equipment.  I mean I understand saving money but it feels sometimes they can't see the bigger picture with our care and benefits.


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#4 Tinbasher

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 11:21 PM

The problem and its the same within a socialised medical system like the NHS is that what a is huge deeply personal issue to us is insignificant when seen against the big public health issues.

Personally I don't think these techno/ mechanical gizmos will ever be a solution to our problems. Cost and practicality are just the beginning.
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#5 Lee.

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 11:26 PM

its not all about just walking its all the other shit that comes with sci, quiet literally :P


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#6 Ratticis

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 11:35 PM

$60 grand to stand up and most likely piss myself? No thanks

 

And of course fox is only like 10 years behind and Obama is evil


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#7 SU31

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 12:25 AM

The truth is that we are not a profitable enough market. To Ratticis's point, never mind who would pay that much. Who could afford to pay that much. My friend works in this field as an engineer. On our way to Vermont last week we discussed exoskeletons in depth and its potential for those with SCI. His take is that they are far more likely to be used in factories for labor enabling fewer people to do more work with less energy.

 

This is a quote from the conversation- " Dude they aren't spending all this money and doing all this R&D so people can walk again. Believe me. It may be an interesting by product, but my firm has absolutely nothing to do with bio tech"


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#8 Tinbasher

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 12:38 PM

SU31

Your post reminded me of a similar conversation I had perhaps 25 years ago about the Digital Revolution. I was naively suggesting that when disabled people could all work from home and be as productive as others then unemployment amongst disabled people would become less prevalent. My friend ( a well regarded disability policy academic) said no when anyone can work from anywhere those jobs will still go to non disabled people but in other (cheaper) parts of the globe.

Now every time "Robert" with a Mumbai accent rings me from a call centre in india. I think it ought to be a disabled person ringing from their bedroom in the UK.

The money will win out every time.
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#9 SU31

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:09 PM

After seeing the spot on Fox and this thread I thought how weird it was that we had just had that conversation. We had spoken about it before as well. His firm is more into robotics. This guy is smart, maybe one of the smartest guys I know. I definitely believe him. 

 

He did say that it would certainly be available to those with SCI. His point is that the technology is being developed for another reason and will likely always be financially out of reach for anyone without very deep pockets.



#10 SparrowLegs

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 05:19 PM

A similar recent story in the British press on this:

 

http://www.dailymail...ionic-legs.html

 

Once you get past the 'wow factor' of robots like this you do ask yourself 'even if it was significantly cheaper, would you really want one'? It doesn't look very practical of functional.

 

Can you climb or decend stairs with it? Sit on the toilet with it? Manage to catheter yourself with it on? etc etc


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#11 deltakilo

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 04:42 AM

Robotics is a crock of BS and not going to "cure" us. Put that money towards stem cell research which is the answer. :)



#12 Kriket308

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:57 PM

I can't help but watch this and think, "This is not walking." Walking should be effortless. And anyone that has ever been in KAFO's knows that even with an exoskeleton, this is far from effortless. So, uh, thanks for the metaphorical band aid over the gaping SCI wound, but let's actually fix the problem, eh?
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#13 lcgarrison

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 09:23 PM

Kudos Kriket308 you have dissected the topic of this thread and applied an amazingly rational post. :specool:



#14 JerseyBoy

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 03:13 AM

The problem is that ppl think that our ONLY problem is that we can't walk(I can but still).

I can't help but watch this and think, "This is not walking." Walking should be effortless. And anyone that has ever been in KAFO's knows that even with an exoskeleton, this is far from effortless. So, uh, thanks for the metaphorical band aid over the gaping SCI wound, but let's actually fix the problem, eh?


The problem is that ppl think that our ONLY problem is that we can't walk(I can but still). Only if it was that easy.
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#15 Fatbelly

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 06:39 AM

I'm looking in to bionic legs !!! Woot woot hook me up will no more this month. Going to ask anyway

#16 T11BurstFracture

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 12:00 PM

What SCI injury person's main concern is " fake walking " if incomplete & not a destroyed cord. Ok, maybe..
We are continual income.. It doesn't matter.. Plus/ we are paralyzed we don't feel pain below our lever of injury.. Therefore it's phantom, NOT.
When was the last time. Anyone here was thoroughly checked out.. Besides the date of injury and months r three past that date. Shoot, i gotta start post.. No sleep 4 th day.. Brain is mud.

#17 SparrowLegs

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 08:24 PM

Recently I've been thinking more about this kind of technology and whilst I was quick to write it off initially I really think it will play a role in helping spinal cord injury patients in some ways at least. I reckon eventually 'plegics will be using this kind of device perhaps like they do a standing frame today - ie for a few hours a week as part of therapy or just their daily routine.

 

At present there are a few things which make these suits infeasible:

 

1 - Cost - at 50-100k USD it really is out of reach to most spinal cord injury sufferers and even gyms.

2 - The battery doesn't last very long.

3- The battery is huge and overall the suit is too heavy.

 

Well, history tells us that scientists and engineers will eventually overcome problems like the aforementioned. And technology always comes down in cost as it progresses (remember what tv's and pcs used to cost in the 90s!!). A unit which costs between 5-10k would mean many more gyms and hospitals could buy something like this. And of course individuals (people pay similar prices for hand bikes).

 

And for incompletes or those with some motor function, I see no reason why a unit like this cannot ultimately serve a practical use too (as well as a therapeutic one). Currently I believe a third person (PT etc) is required to actuate steps with a button push and eventually the walker themselves can do it via buttons on a walker or stick, But it can't be that difficult for a user to make a partial or weak movement and the suit respond to this and then take over.

 

I don't know - maybe it's just wishful thinking on my part but who knows.

 

Anyone have any thoughts?

 

 


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#18 Califanna

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 11:32 PM

Recently I've been thinking more about this kind of technology and whilst I was quick to write it off initially I really think it will play a role in helping spinal cord injury patients in some ways at least. I reckon eventually 'plegics will be using this kind of device perhaps like they do a standing frame today - ie for a few hours a week as part of therapy or just their daily routine.

 

At present there are a few things which make these suits infeasible:

 

1 - Cost - at 50-100k USD it really is out of reach to most spinal cord injury sufferers and even gyms.

2 - The battery doesn't last very long.

3- The battery is huge and overall the suit is too heavy.

 

Well, history tells us that scientists and engineers will eventually overcome problems like the aforementioned. And technology always comes down in cost as it progresses (remember what tv's and pcs used to cost in the 90s!!). A unit which costs between 5-10k would mean many more gyms and hospitals could buy something like this. And of course individuals (people pay similar prices for hand bikes).

 

And for incompletes or those with some motor function, I see no reason why a unit like this cannot ultimately serve a practical use too (as well as a therapeutic one). Currently I believe a third person (PT etc) is required to actuate steps with a button push and eventually the walker themselves can do it via buttons on a walker or stick, But it can't be that difficult for a user to make a partial or weak movement and the suit respond to this and then take over.

 

I don't know - maybe it's just wishful thinking on my part but who knows.

 

Anyone have any thoughts?

 

 

Sign me up for the device.

 

Granted the newly injured will have first crack at these devices. For us older injuries, we are too high a risk due to atrophy and overall bone loss. 





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