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Heel Boots




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10 replies to this topic

#1 NancyE

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 07:43 PM

I almost lost my leg to a pressure sore on my heel the first year or so I was injured. They ended up just cutting it down to the bone- literally. This flat area has no padding, and I am now terrified of heel sores, so I am a fanatic about keeping my heels floated . For years I used pillows, but spasm so much they were never in the right place. Then I used something called a heels off, made by skil-care. It was a vinyl covered rectangle of firm foam that I put my lower legs on, and heels hung off. The only problem was when I spasmed, they would touch, and it takes me an hour for that to register with me. That item belonged to the old nursing home, so I have been using waffle boots I got from a hospital last year. Finally to my question! Do you keep your heels floated, and if so, how? The strap on one waffle boot tore, so it's time to start looking for my next solution. I have been shopping online, and this shit is expensive. Any suggestions?
Reality continues to ruin my life. - Calvin and Hobbes

#2 Tetracyclone

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 08:37 PM

I almost lost my leg to a pressure sore on my heel the first year or so I was injured. They ended up just cutting it down to the bone- literally. This flat area has no padding, and I am now terrified of heel sores, so I am a fanatic about keeping my heels floated . For years I used pillows, but spasm so much they were never in the right place. Then I used something called a heels off, made by skil-care. It was a vinyl covered rectangle of firm foam that I put my lower legs on, and heels hung off. The only problem was when I spasmed, they would touch, and it takes me an hour for that to register with me. That item belonged to the old nursing home, so I have been using waffle boots I got from a hospital last year. Finally to my question! Do you keep your heels floated, and if so, how? The strap on one waffle boot tore, so it's time to start looking for my next solution. I have been shopping online, and this shit is expensive. Any suggestions?

This is a job for Super Sibling!  He should find a soft lightweight boot or boot-slipper, build up the heel on the outside then cut out a portion of the inside where your bone is exposed.  Sounds good in theory...


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#3 JerseyBoy

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 04:50 AM

What kinda chair?
Either you choose to be blessed to be cursed or cursed to be blessed. I choose to be blessed to be cursed. 

#4 NancyE

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 06:33 AM

Wasn't in my chair....went to bed fine, woke up with huge blisters on both heels. One healed, one got infected. I was so stupid and depressed, they had a waffle boot on it over lots of gauze and wet-to-dry, and the bottom of the waffle boot was stained green from drainage. Finally this retired army nurse was filling in and came to change bandage and she took a whiff of it and called the ambulance, and I was sent off to hospital. The doctors kept conferring and finally one said, we may have to take your leg, to save your life. Put that way, it seems quite reasonable.
Reality continues to ruin my life. - Calvin and Hobbes

#5 brockit79

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:16 AM

Developing a pressure sore like that in a nursing home is unacceptable itself but it getting infected! ffs Nancy what kind of medical/care team are they?!

 

Pressure deflection is key, as Tetra' described above, to maintaining even pressure.

 

When in bed I sleep with my feet dangled over a memory foam cushion. Semi compressed felt can be cut to make what is sometimes known as a doughnut pad, then stuck on to the foot so that the area in the middle is free of pressure or more evenly distributed. It may be  possible to then wear regular shoes but they will need to accommodate the dressing.

 

Is it possible to see a podiatrist? Even if they can show you what I have described then your carers assist with ongoing dressing. 


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Neek me chawa, wermo, mo killie ma klounkee!

#6 WaveWolf

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 09:44 AM

Brings chills to read your story.  I almost lost my foot similarly, went from a small black dot to the whole heel black in less than 24 hours.  This was not a pressure sore, but infection from within.  Fortunately, I was admitted to hospital and there was a terrific foot wound care specialist on call that night.  I was horrified (mentally), but he did the cutting without anesthesia right in my room, right after dinner!!!  I felt nothing, but saw the blood and almost lost it.  It was done in isolation like this because I am immune suppressed for neurosarcoidosis.  Took forever to heal, especially when I was in the nursing home from hell for a stretch.  Like you, I have a permanent spot that is hardly padded.

 

After paralysis, I tried elevating my feet with a memory cushion, but my legs would not stay on it and I couldn't tell.  My knees, ankles, and heels were getting irritated from pressure on bony parts.  Total relief wearing padded "boots" (Heelboot Orthotic) that also help position me during sleep: http://www.abledata.com/abledata.cfm?pageid=113583&top=0&productid=204132&trail=0.  I have used them for three years, and they are beginning to show signs of having been washed a lot!  They look hot, but I am a heavy sweater and they are comfortable even in humid summers in Pennsylvania.  The fleece allows air circulation, and covers are washable.  Fabric and velcro has held up very well.  I haven't needed a "blanket lifter" with these: extending the toe plate kept weight off the ends of my toes.  Value is in the durability, effectiveness, and comfort.


Edited by WaveWolf, 01 April 2013 - 09:48 AM.

HOEA RA!


#7 NancyE

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 10:11 AM

They did the cutting in my room too, but I have some sensation, and the deeper he went the worse it was. I don't know why, but I just get quiet and still when something hurts a lot. I cried after he left, the nurse who came to bandage it was ticked at the dr. My boot with the torn strap came apart a while ago, so have one on bad foot only. If this nurse tells me one more time not to worry about skin because I am on an air mattress, I am gonna scream. This is a hospital, yet they have no protective boots. He says they might, in central supply... if it were open. Thanks for the link to orthotic boot, I am checking on prices and options now.
Reality continues to ruin my life. - Calvin and Hobbes

#8 SlowerNotOver

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 02:56 PM

They did the cutting in my room too, but I have some sensation, and the deeper he went the worse it was. I don't know why, but I just get quiet and still when something hurts a lot. I cried after he left, the nurse who came to bandage it was ticked at the dr. My boot with the torn strap came apart a while ago, so have one on bad foot only. If this nurse tells me one more time not to worry about skin because I am on an air mattress, I am gonna scream. This is a hospital, yet they have no protective boots. He says they might, in central supply... if it were open. Thanks for the link to orthotic boot, I am checking on prices and options now.

Nancy, I am so sorry to read this. Same order for bed, should cover a boot, along with a blanket/sheet lifter. Though the responsibility falls on the caregivers, to maintain the correct usage. The Orthotic boot(non ambulatory) they'll put on you when you are up in your chair..but the CNA's have to do their job when you're in bed, contrary to popular opinion,, an air mattress is not the end all for pressure sores. Just make sure when you get your boot,, they put your name on it,, that too will get lost in the laundry.

"I don't know why, but I just get quiet and still when something hurts a lot.".. :( . I hope everything works out... : :hug: Just wondering,, has State come in yet? ,,, their skin survey has them red flagged I'm sure!!! Take Care :) 


Edited by SlowerNotOver, 01 April 2013 - 02:57 PM.

Depth Over Distance.....
 
 

#9 NancyE

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 06:25 PM

Think things might be mixed up... Heel is healed, just sort of a semi circular shape to it, no padding on the flat part. In hospital at moment for colonoscopy/ upper GI tests. In a different nursing home from one heel sore occurred in, and they are making good headway with one on sacrum. Just need new options to protect feet in bed. Wear really wide new balence in chair, can't get up without shoes because of diabetes. Oh, and keep reminding this nurse to order me boots from central supply-maybe they will have good ones.
Reality continues to ruin my life. - Calvin and Hobbes

#10 Wheelzup77

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 07:33 PM

Hi Nancy,

 

I had similar problems with my feet every-time I got new shoes. My doctor looked at the sore and said what I had wasn't a traditional pressure sore but it was a blister that took what seemed like forever to heal. His suggestion was to wear a shoe that is one size larger than what it actually should be. I made the switch and it helped. I had another one blow up in the same spot and after feeling the inside of the shoe there was a very hard seam that ran right down the middle of the shoes heel. I wasn't having much luck finding a shoe that fit the bill until I looked at hiking shoes. I found a pair that are quite comfortable in both hot and cold weather, very lightweight, support my ankles when I transfer, keep my feet dry and even protect my toes if I use my feet to push open a door. I told my doctor about them and he had me come in so he could see them. He was impressed as they met every criteria he uses and recommends them to some of his patients. Needless to say the blisters have not returned in the 4 years I've had this pair.

 

When I'm sleeping I found that propping my feet up so my heels were not touching my bed was much easier than wearing those clumsy heel boots that would slide around on my feet every single time I moved while in bed. At first I used one large pillow but when turning on my side my ankles would rub each other and actually hurt at times. My sister works in a fabric store and they have these round foam pillows that are about a foot long and 8 inches or so around. We made a custom pillowcase for them so they could be washed or fluffed back up. We use two of them and to keep my feet from banging together be it from spasms or me turning on my side we stuffed a small pillow between them and it works great.

 

Granted I do have enough sensation in my feet despite my injury being at the C5-C6 level I can usually tell where they are. My injury is some 32 years post from an odd diving accident where I didn't hit the bottom of the lake, instead it happened as soon as I hit the water feeling a small pop in my neck instantly. I never had a trach or surgery on my neck just traction then a brace for about 6 months and spending nearly a year in the hospital and rehab facility combined.

 

I hope this helps or at least gives you some other ideas that might fit your needs a little bit better.



#11 NancyE

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 03:02 AM

The hospital gave me PODUS boots. If I tell them to fasten them snugly I don't move around too much. Additionally , they have what I call a kickstand- a plastic bar about four inches long that comes out from the side. If its adjusted towards the outside of my calf, it keeps my legs straight. I had not realized how uncomfortable my hip rotation had gotten to be until it stopped. The other thing I like about them-besides not paying out of pocket- is it keeps my foot in the correct position. I am so tall that with foot drop, my toes are constantly hitting the foot board- and sometimes I feel it before a red mark appears, and sometimes I don't. Problem solved for now.
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Reality continues to ruin my life. - Calvin and Hobbes


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