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Spinal Corrective Surgery

spine surgery deterioration fused spinal scaffolding



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12 replies to this topic

#1 WetRain

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 05:01 PM

OK

My back is crumbling, and getting more curved

This is due to deterioration where my break is, Well just below 

 

The surgeon says he can fuse parts, plus add a bit of scaffolding to help support it.

 

I'm 28yrs post injury. and quite mobile and independent.

 

I'm wondering anyone else had this surgery for what ever reason?

 

and how it effected them plus if they had the choice would they still have it?



#2 McTavish

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 11:11 PM

The same surgery to rectify the curve in my spine has left me in a wheelchair a paraplegic T4 incomplete. Before the surgery I was able bodied (albeit with pain) but able to get around. It was the worst thing I ever did having that spinal fusion I wish I had looked into what other therapies were available.

This is only my opinion and I am sure surgery has different results for everyone. If you decide to have it it could be very successful ( I hope it is).

Take care and keep us posted on what you decide. :) 



#3 Fatbelly

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 05:49 AM

The thought of surgery makes me sick .... But one has got to do what one has got to do!
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#4 WetRain

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 12:24 PM

Hello McTavish. 

Thank you for your reply

 

I can certainly see why you're not overly impressed.  The slight difference is, I'm already T6 complete, and to what I could work out, all the support would be below this level, so in that respect, I'm not going to be any worse.

My real concern is how much flexibility I lose, and then there is the danger of the rods breaking? Plus would I end up having to be less independent.

 

And Fatbelly I do agree the thought, certainly isn't a fun one. But would the end result be worth it??

 

Cheers all  Mark



#5 brockit79

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 12:42 PM

Hey Mark,

 

I’d have thought that you’ll be less independent for a period of time just after surgery whilst you recover but not forever. Hopefully the aim is to improve your stability not worsen it, a surgeon is better equipped to answer this question in this regard.

 

The question is: if your spine is crumbling then what will happen if you choose to leave it, and decline to have surgery? 

 

A lot to think about for you, I hope you come to a decision soon and the process isn’t too traumatic. You know where I am if you want to chat.

 

Kel-le-Broc


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#6 WetRain

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 02:42 PM

Hey You too

 

This is where some of the trouble in decision making starts -

One consultant says by doing this I will end up more rigid and not a lot of flexibility at all.

However the second  says it wouldn't really change that much due to the fact it looks like most of my spine has fused together anyway.

 

And the 1st sent me to 2nd for the second opinion. 

 

This is why I'm trying to find someone who's had something similar and what their reaction is to it.

 

:)



#7 Lee.

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 09:23 PM

lol that just puts you back to square one :P, i would have a guess and say depends how many vertebrae are getting fused, ive got rods in my back from 3 below and 2 above the break, but i thought thats just normal :/ i dont think you would lose much independance, good luck with what you chose


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#8 brockit79

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 09:38 PM

I know people with fusions, and can’t say how it will affect you, however if you don’t find anyone then consider what the pros and cons of such an op will give you. Perhaps ask the surgeon whether with rehab you can be independent. Despite not having the op you mention those are the things I’d ponder, I’m guessing that even someone with multiple fusions may respond differently to you.

 

Best of luck.


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#9 SparrowLegs

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 10:22 PM

Hey You too

 

This is where some of the trouble in decision making starts -

One consultant says by doing this I will end up more rigid and not a lot of flexibility at all.

However the second  says it wouldn't really change that much due to the fact it looks like most of my spine has fused together anyway.

 

And the 1st sent me to 2nd for the second opinion. 

 

This is why I'm trying to find someone who's had something similar and what their reaction is to it.

 

:)

 

I had a LOT of fusion and fixation done post injury. It was done by an orthopaedic surgeon who didn't really have a massive deal of experience in spinal surgery. When I got transferred to the spinal unit they were shocked at how much fixation was actually put in. All that said, it really didn't affect my flexibility at all. I've since had the whole lot taken out and I can't feel much of a difference.

 

What I'm trying to say is, our bodies can handle a lot of fusion and fixation and still remain pretty 'normal' (paralysis aside obviously).


Edited by SparrowLegs, 20 December 2013 - 10:23 PM.

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#10 harlton

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 05:56 PM

My Back is crumbling also, I'm 25yrs out, but I have archonditis scar tissue and I still remember the pain and disability that followed after my surgeries, last time.  I don't have the fitness or the strength to overcome that now, so I turned it down. I was also offered with great pressure these steriod/anesthetic mix injections by my GP. The clinic I was recommended to, turns out it does nothing else, one size fits all. I turned them down also, now it turn's out there not even approved. I have no faith left in these guys, they try it, you pay for it. I've paid enough. Nothing they have done on me to date, surgically has worked, I was better off without it.

       I've noticed a lot of info has suddenly appeared on the net, concerning failed back surgery and Arachconditis, makes me wonder why. Most I've read recommend's against further surgical intervention, but if earlier attempts improved you I guess your in the lucky group, if your long term result wasn't good first time, there's no evidence that I can see that states this time will be better. I'm staying with my med's and riding that plan into the ground, they've had enough out of my life, I'll give them no more. I hope your in the lucky group and you improve.



#11 WetRain

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 09:34 PM

Thanks for al you replies people

 

It's still in the discussion question and ask more questions stage

 

If I remember I'll try keep updated just incase someone else has the same issues!!!


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#12 dkrueger

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 06:29 AM

My husband was fused from T2-L1 before his SCI...he got a staph infection from this fusion and they tried to treat it for 2 years before they decided that the infection was not going away so they went in and removed the hardware... the plan was to go back in after the infection was treated and re-instrument the spine for stabilization...due to further complications from the removal surgery (Pulmonary Embolism that took 4 months to find!) they were not able to re-stabilize/re-fuse the spine..hubby lived like this in extreme pain for about 4 years all the while his spine was ":crumbling" at T-10 level..the spine collapsed onto his lungs which sent him into respiratory failure after that NO neurologist would treat or even take him on as a patient...his spine continued to collapse and his lungs continued to collape and continued to throw him deeper into respiratory failure..we were finally told that when the spine collapses or crumbles it has to go somewhere and that somewhere is usually on top of internal organs..mainly the heart and lungs...which then causes organ failure.. which is where my husband was...the doctors had already approved him for hospice care and had told us that there was nothing they could do..no one would clear him for a corrective spinal surgery because they could not determine how bad his lungs had been damaged vs how much was the actual spinal collapse so therefore they could not clear him for surgery since there was too big a chance he would not live through it...we were VERY lucky and found a brilliant orthotist who designed a special back brace which actually re-aligned his spine and released his lungs...which then started testing out within normal limits...docs where then able to verify that the actual damage was minimal and most of the failure was caused by the weight of the collapsed spine..they did the corrective surgery last May and hubby is doing great!  Yes, he has extreme pain daily...yes, his flexibility is not great...yes, the actual surgery is beyond painful BUT his lungs are clear, he can breathe and he is now off the hospice list... It is more than just the spine being flexible or not..it can actually be a matter of life and death if your spine is not stable and you can reach a point where docs will not treat it... I don't mean to be fatalistic, this is just our experience and we really wish someone had told us this during the 4 years that we chose not to do anything about the spinal collapse...Wishing you the best of luck with whatever decision you make :)

 

ETA: To correct the collapsed spine, the surgeon had to fuse T-1 to L-4....


Edited by dkrueger, 18 February 2014 - 06:31 AM.

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#13 WetRain

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 07:19 PM

Well having 2 consultant's say leave it for a while, then for now taking their advice.

I do have other issues I need to sort first, so

Here's hoping
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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: spine, surgery, deterioration, fused, spinal scaffolding

Spinal Cord Injury & Cauda Equina Syndrome Support

This website is a way for those with spinal cord injuries and cauda equina syndrome to share experiences and advice. Any medical matters, treatments or alternative therapies discussed on this website should be thoroughly reviewed by a medical professional or therapist before being acted upon. Under no circumstances should you alter prescribed medication or a medical care plan without consulting your doctor or care plan supervisor first.