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#1 icarus_melt76

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 06:17 AM

Hi

From day one I've had these terrible 'cold' sweats. I'm talking 'dripping' sweats. Sometimes for days or weeks, other times shorter or not at all. Everyone thinks I'm too hot but am freezin' my ass. It becomes so profuse that my shirts and anything else worn gets soaked thru in a flash. Always have towels with me to wipe my neck. Even in the summer, but it isn't as uncomfortable. Some days I can't warm up .......I hate it. Have 3 hair dryers in different rooms to blow down my neck or back of my neck and head. Even when sleeping. Usually not as bad but still wake up grappling with the dryer I keep on the bed. Sometimes a few times a night. Pillow 'n sheet get wet making it worse. Anyone else suffer from this hidious side effect?

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Edited by icarus_melt76, 10 November 2006 - 06:23 AM.

Can lead a horse to water but hard as hell teachin' him the breast stroke!

#2 juls

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 06:24 AM

I was in rehab with a girl that had a similar problem to you...she was a paraplegic and it didn't matter how cold or hot it was she would just continually sweat, i leant her my jacket alot and everytime i got it back it was literally dripping with sweat (i ended up giving it to her :D )

The last time i seen her, she was going to the doc's about new medication to trial...have you seen your doc about the problem??

#3 DaveP

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 11:48 AM

I had a similar problem, on and off, but it hasn't happened for a couple of years now. This used to coincide with bouts for pain so I just assumed the swesting was a "by product" of being in pain. As soon as I sorted the source of the pain (lower back and sore guts) the sweating stopped.

As a little experiment, I would take a different type of pain killer to see if it had any effect, trying to determine where/what the pain was. For example, if I thought the source of the pain was my lower back (posture), I'd take a pain killer for that and see what happened. There are different types of pain killers for different types of pain - analgesics, narcotic analgesics, etc, etc (spelling!).

Maybe you're sweating is similarly connected to being in pain.

#4 Izziwhizzi

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 01:11 PM

I have too been the queen of sweats and hated it. It is a tetra thing!

When I was first injured I sweated for over 2 years and it only stopped when I changed my bowel & bladder care. Its an autonomic reaction I think so your body is doing it to tell you somethings up. I can sweat so half of me is dry and other pouring. If you ran a ringer across my top lip it stops exactly at the half way point.

I definately find it happens when theres something wrong and your body is in pain and saying 'stop!'. I still get it but infrequently nowadays (I'm in my 25th yr post injury now - silver jubilee coming up). A tetra friend had it really bad too - his was from kidney stones.

My first suggestion is bowel routine/fullness. Does your routine totally empty you? I sweat if there is anything in my lower bowel. I always sweat when I do my bowel routine and for a while afterwards.

How about position in your chair? I used to sit with my hips quite forward but nowadays that always makes me sweat so I sit very upright with my bum well tucked into the back of the chair. If I sit up in bed I start to sweat after an hour or so and have to lie down, also I can only sleep on one side - sleeping on the other I sweat within an hour - I think my muscles/bones don't like lying in that position.

If my feet are uncomfortable in my shoes, I have an ingrowing toenail, have an infection, ate too much curry - all these and a whole lot more are triggers.

The only thing that I can suggest is work through the list seeing when it starts and try to work out the triggers. Its not a magic science though - even after my years of experience I sweated for the whole of my sisters wedding - all the photos have me with soaking wet hair and pale coloured linen shirts soaked through.

L xx

#5 DaveP

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 04:53 PM

I used to joke about it and say, "I can't meet you today as I'm sweating like a rapist again" and friends would laugh and understand. I was going to mention my little joke in my last post but seeing as our sisters here have been subjected to so much anti-feminist jokes recently, I thought better of it and decided not to.

But... I've been out for a lovely lunch (POETS day) and too much red wine was enjoyed, so am feeling brave! lol

#6 icarus_melt76

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 11:07 PM

Thanx for your imput gang. I see we're similar in our break levels. Failed to mention up front, but my sweat is also limited and clearly defined down my right side only. Like Izziwhizzi, another 'lifer'.....30 years, I'm in full agreement it is a warning of something not right. Gets worse as I near my bowel routine. Have always had bladder infections and the sweats go nuts when I can't uhh...pee. Tried medicines from and for everything. Had 3 operations to open the sphynctre (sp?), no dice. Spastic bladder works when it likes. Oh well.

DaveP had some good inmput. I'm with you 'bout being pain-related. Strange positioning or sitting still (long car ride). When I drive, I seem to be wiggling around or something to keep things at bay for a while.

juls, you tried. ha. Thx anyhoo.......got another jacket? As with most of us, doctors and even specialists are guessing most of the time. Or More. Don't bank on what they say!

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Can lead a horse to water but hard as hell teachin' him the breast stroke!

#7 *LoraB*

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 10:23 AM

Hi Icarus (love the name!)

I know exactly where your coming from...sweating just doesn't do it justice.

My husband used to suffer with this ..but not so much now. It is always related to pain, the kind your body can feel but you may not be aware that something is wrong..when we got together his diet was bad and his routine was every other day..as I took over his care, changed to daily routine and introduced him to vegetables etc it really improved..

Now if he gets one we know something is really wrong.

Don't know if thats any help..but I hope it gives you a bit of comfort knowing your not alone.

Best regards

Lora.

#8 cprahl

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 01:41 PM

:cheers: Hey I know what you mean, i had these COLD SWEATS from pain. Its an Autonomic reaction to your body hurting somewhere you can't feel. I would sweat so much I got UTIs and thats dangerous. I was put on a good Analgesic after the UTI and my sweating stopped. Now you may have to justify whether the sweating is easier to live with or taking some pain pill, but if you keep the dose low the pain pill is for me the best solution.
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#9 Tamzin

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 10:33 AM

:hug: Hey I know what you mean, i had these COLD SWEATS from pain. Its an Autonomic reaction to your body hurting somewhere you can't feel. I would sweat so much I got UTIs and thats dangerous. I was put on a good Analgesic after the UTI and my sweating stopped. Now you may have to justify whether the sweating is easier to live with or taking some pain pill, but if you keep the dose low the pain pill is for me the best solution.


Hi cprahl
You mentioned that you would sweat so much that you got UTIs. I assume that you're referring to Urinary Tract Infections? Can sweating too much cause UTI's?

#10 cprahl

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 12:13 PM

Hi cprahl
You mentioned that you would sweat so much that you got UTIs. I assume that you're referring to Urinary Tract Infections? Can sweating too much cause UTI's?




:hug: Yes it happened to me, I was sweating so much from pain , that I was freezing and its hard to drink enough when your cold, so I got dehydrated and got a Urinary tract infection. I was changing clothes 4 times a day till my doctor put me on pain meds. :cheers:

Edited by cprahl, 02 January 2007 - 12:14 PM.

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#11 Moonshadow

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 12:28 AM

To Icarus melt76
I've been taking propanthalene for 33 years now to help the sweating problem. It does work most of the time. I call it my sweat pill.
I'm new here and hope to be in touch with many of you in the future.

Moonshadow

#12 Apparelyzed

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 09:01 AM

Hi,

For the majority of Quadriplegics, sweating is a symptom of Autonomic Dysreflexia.

Short term sweating can be from a pain stimulus such as blocked catheter, full bowel, broken skin, ingrowing toenails etc.

Long term sweating is most commonly associated with a stimulus from the bladder. Such stimulus can be caused by irritation of the bladder from bladder stones, bladder infections, muscle spasms in the bladder wall, overtight bladder sphincter, loss of voiding reflex, tearing of the urethra from catheterisation etc.

In order to reduce any of the bladder related symptoms, you should see a urologist who has experience in spinal cord injuries.

I sweated for my first 6 months of my injury, really bad, my pillow was always soaked, and my skin on my face was a right mess due to rashes of spots.

I had a Supra Pubic cather put in, and the sweating stopped straight away. I still get sweats if my catheter blocks, but that's ok, as it's my early warning system, and I can tell a couple of days before it blocks that it's going to happen.

Regards

Simon

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#13 Jennii

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 01:30 AM

Basically, like what everyone's been saying: since your body may not have the typical lower sensation when something is up, it will interpret it instead as a different sensation (known as Autonomic Dysreflexia).

Symptoms can be anything from a headache, cold sweats, ETC. Each person may receive such a response differently, and responses may also be varied depending on the resource for it in the first place (for example, if my bladder's full, I get a headache and a cold sweat; if I'm just in pain, I'll just get the headache, but an entirely different type of headache).

Blah… blah-blah… blah-dee, blah-blah…


ANYWAY, without getting too repetitious with all that other rubbish, I'm sure you're wondering how to solve it?

Obviously, first thing's first: find out what the resource is, and then do what you can to solve it. But let's say you can't solve it right away, or the symptoms still lag a bit afterwards — one thing I do (just for the cold sweats anyway that is) is keep a little, good quality and safe electric heater close by, like what you've been doing with the blow dryers (or what that someone else? PAH! Damn my short-term memory). It helps to either completely eliminate the problem, or at the vary least tone down the severity. Even though you may feel cold though, do NOT try to cover up. It'll only make you sweat more, feel even more cold, and just overall feel gross, soggy, and uncomfortable (as I'm sure you've discovered). Heh'. Just make sure you turn it off during the times you do successfully dry off to save energy, plus try to do it when no one else is too close by so then you don't make them all miserable.

#14 elisabeth

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 03:50 PM

that no one ever explained it to me when I was in rehab was really frustrating because I thought something more serious was wrong, but my GP is experienced in dealing with spinal patients and basically said that sweating down one side of the body is autonomic dysreflexia. I used to get that as a symptom all the time, but now I get different symptoms for autonomic dysreflexia like the doom feeling (albeit only rarely) as well as ringing in my years and the headache thing... I've never understood why the sweating symptom stopped... maybe I'm just weird!

#15 Jennii

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 06:35 PM

I get different symptoms for autonomic dysreflexia like the doom feeling (albeit only rarely)


The 'doom feeling'? Just like, anxiety attacks, or…? (If you don't mind explaining)

Edited by Jennii, 08 February 2007 - 06:35 PM.


#16 livestrong

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 02:45 AM

The sweets hot and cold ca be form the pain meds.I been on them for along time and even though Iam takeing for pain your body comes addicted to it,But the aunotmic system effects heart rate,blood pressure and tempture,So the ranges from what a paralyzed person has to deal with daily is so dam hard

#17 ziggy

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 10:12 AM

Cold sweats are brutal,especially when you live in cold climate.I shaved my head because i got sick of sweat making my hair feel gross and harder to dry off.

Another thing i've noticed,the longer i go since my injury the more i hate cold weather and crave warm weather.Living in Wisconsin means only having three months of summer and long winters,it's a real drag.I am jeleous of anyone who lives in a warm place like California or Arizona.

#18 zeta

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 07:31 PM

It can sometimes be nice living in a warm climate, but it gets so hot here between june and september that I don't even want to go out. For me not being able to sweat in 100 degree heat is just as bad as my cold sweats.

#19 ryan Kruse

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Posted 24 April 2007 - 01:11 AM

It can sometimes be nice living in a warm climate, but it gets so hot here between june and september that I don't even want to go out. For me not being able to sweat in 100 degree heat is just as bad as my cold sweats.


I totally agree with you there. I have to keep a spray bottle around when I'm out in the heat for any period of time. Only when it is above 78 do I feel I can shed a couple layers? The whole to hot or to cold thing is the worst for me being disabled. I hate it. My poor family puts up with me and allows for the heat to be set at 76 along with air. I even stopped going to my aunts in Myrtle Beach because she keeps her house at 65. Feels like a freaking Ice cave. I'll have a long sleeve t-shirt on, a fleece jacket zipped all the way up and a scarf rapped around my head like turban. I love it there but hate it too. Oh well.

As for the sweats, I get them when I am poopen, uti's and pain. I've learned that different sweats mean different things. I'll get totally sweaty when dropping a friend off at the pool. My forehead will sweat when I have an uti and depending on where the pain is coming from the sweats will be on that side. Over time you will learn too what and where. Listen to your body and it will tell you.

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#20 Big Valley

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Posted 24 April 2007 - 05:32 AM

You peeps with the UTI problems. Do you only take meds when you get a UTI or do you stay on a constant low dose of meds to prevent it?

I have been taking a low dose of Cipro for years and haven't had a UTI since then. Much better than trips to the doctor when I got them all the time.

As for the sweats I go along with them being signs. For me I know when I need to go cath because of a full bladder. My body temp raises and the sweat starts to come. I get completely sweaty during bowel time and always plan to take a shower afterwords.

The worst time for me is when going to the movies. I sit in the movie seats which eventually make my ass hurt and I need to shift around more. I start to sweat and it is always so cold in a theater is makes the experience even worse.

I wish I could switch the sweat on during those hot summer days though. No way can I hang out in the sun very long on those days. I nearly pass out sometimes and always have to pass on day time outdoor concerts knowing I can't take it.

#21 Austyn

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 09:27 AM

Just be very careful - it sounds like AD. My partner who has been c5/6 tetraplegic for 35 years has been having episodes like that for ages (and essentially ignoring them) until last weekend when he had a stroke. Thankfully he is making a pretty good recovery but his specialist told him he is very lucky to have survived and these episodes have all been AD - just not enough to cause a stroke.
Austyn


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