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Buffalo Bills Football Player Sustains Spinal Cord Injury




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24 replies to this topic

#1 itsjustme

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 03:34 PM

Buffalo Bills football player Kevin Everett sustained an SCI during the season opener with the Denver Broncos a week ago Sunday. He was paralyzed from just below his shoulders down.

Within minutes of his injury, they used a new "cutting edge" technology on him called Moderate Hypothermia and they say that he has recovered some movement in his arms and legs.

The doctor is saying that he may never play football again but that there is the distinct possiblilty that he may walk.

This is very exciting for me because I can't help wondering if this technology would have made a difference for people like me whose SCI was basically caused by the compression on the spinal cord due to swelling. This may make a huge difference for some in the future.

Here's one link that explains it a little.
http://wcbstv.com/lo..._255181222.html
*Things won't always be the way that they are today.

**Life is indescriminate in it's suffering.

***"Worry looks around, sorry looks back, faith looks up."

#2 Zany

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 03:41 PM

You know, I've been following this story since I first heard it on the news the evening he was injured. Initially the reports they gave from the hospital sounded like the same words spoken to my family after my brother-in-law's accident.

But then Tuesday came and suddenly his doctors were saying he may very well walk again. I was like, huh?? Two days later and they're making this prediction? HOW? And then I read about the saline injection.

I admit at first I was a little miffed, thinking "why did he get it and not my BIL?!" I know, not the way to think. I later learned they were calling it experimental and the EMT just happened to have it on hand at the stadium. Lucky for Kevin, eh? I truly am happy for him.

But I'm with you, justme. Hopefully this is a HUGE breakthrough for the future.

#3 alyssa

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 03:49 PM

kind of makes me wonder...did he just get this treatment because hes rich and important?

#4 itsjustme

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 04:19 PM

I can't find the article that I was reading now or maybe they were just talking about it on the televison piece that I saw, saying that this experimental treatment has come out of a hospital or somewhere down in Florida just in the last year or so.

In my own situation, I had a malformation of blood vessels on my spine. I remember that they did immediately start me on steroids but there was a window that this treatment may have been used had it been available and I wonder if it would have made a difference.

The night of the first day in the hospital I had completely lost the use of both legs but then the morning of the second day, I could stand and walk again holding on. But, then by 4:00 p.m. of that second day I was permanently paralyzed. I guess that the malformation of blood vessels swelled but then went down overnight. However, the swelling reoccured and caused the permanent damage. Had I received the Moderate Hypothermia during that window when I could still stand up would it have had a positive long term effect?

I'm just excited for people in the future if this proves to be effective.
*Things won't always be the way that they are today.

**Life is indescriminate in it's suffering.

***"Worry looks around, sorry looks back, faith looks up."

#5 AuntLinda

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 05:40 PM

Like everyone above, I was surprised at the turn-arouond in 48 hours from his initial prognosis. I read that within 15 minutes of being taken off the football field, his core body temperature was lowered to 92 - 94 degrees F. in an experimental procedure. He was fortunate that the hospital in Miami where he was injured has 150 M.D. specialists on staff, who are all working on reducing the effects of spinal cord injuries!

The thinking behind the reduction in body temperature is to reduce the body's immune response in the swelling at the site of injury.

#6 exojam

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 08:06 PM

Just want to add some things to this. I believe he got this treatment since a doctor who was on the sidelines had went to a seminar at the Miami Project and knew of this experimental treatment. Also, the owner of the Bills has contributed millions of dollars to the Miami Project to help advances like this one be possible. Since the owner knew folks at the MP, one of the doctors their called the doctor on the sideline to offer assistance. Not sure about anyone else but I am very happy that he may never have to sit in a chair like me.

#7 Doug

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 08:29 PM

kind of makes me wonder...did he just get this treatment because hes rich and important?

I believe you are absolutly right. famous= extra care

#8 exojam

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 09:56 PM

I just have to ask how you think because he had more money he got better treatment? Did you have a full medical staff 50 feet away when you were hurt? I know I did not, neither did I have doctor right there who knew abot that type of treatment. Hell they had to life flight me out of the woods. The money this guy has-had has no bearing on his treatment. He was a lucky person to have all those people sitting right there where the rest of us did not.

#9 LilCube

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 10:14 PM

...and the treatment was developed by the "Miami Project" a foundation setup by former NFL player Nick Buoniconti(I think it was him). That's likely why they had the treatment available on field.
http://www.lilcube.com/blog - My blog! - looks best with Mozilla Firefox

#10 alyssa

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 10:27 PM

right...he was just in the right place at the right time...no more to it.

Don't get me wrong, I think this is an amazing breakthrough...it just makes me wonder is all...

#11 nomis

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 11:33 PM

I’m pretty ignorant of this area of research but my understanding is that they’ve been working for some time with using cooling techniques to reduced swelling.

The catch is it requires rapid implementation so you need to have your accident close to the facilities.

It’s the swelling around the injury site that often causes much of the damage. The doctors may have been able to change their prognosis if x-rays and other investigations showed no likely damage to the cord if they can only stop the swelling.

Rather than having the right amount of money, it is probably more about doing the wrong thing in the right place at the right time.

"We are all different - but we share the same human spirit. Perhaps it's human nature that we adapt - and survive." - Stephen Hawking 2013


#12 itsjustme

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 12:59 AM

Well, I sent an email to the doctor who did my lamenectomy, Dr. Scott Shapiro. He's the same doctor who did bicyclist Lance Armstrong's brain surgery when he was fighting cancer.

He's not nearly as optimistic about the effectiveness of Moderate Hypothermia. He says that it's been studied for 50 years and that it's not a totally new breakthrough. He says that more than likely in Everett's case he was not competely paralyzed. He says in my case, what would have been more beneficial would have been earlier intervention with the AVM, malformation of blood vessels. (I was convinced that I had MS and instead of getting the MRI of my spine done they were making an appointment for an MRI of my head to rule in or out MS the morning that I started to become paralyzed.)

So who knows but on the chance that it helps even one of our next potential Apparelyzed friends I hope...
*Things won't always be the way that they are today.

**Life is indescriminate in it's suffering.

***"Worry looks around, sorry looks back, faith looks up."

#13 Joed

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 03:34 PM

I just heard on the news this morning that they expect him to be walking in two weeks. He's been transported to another facility that's closer to his home.

Edited by Joed, 21 September 2007 - 03:35 PM.

* * * * * * * * *

Female. Incomplete para following a cord stroke in '03. Spina-bifida, severe scoliosis. 18 surgeries total...five spine-related: Three fusions w/hardware, two tethered cord releases.

#14 Doug

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 04:06 PM

I just have to ask how you think because he had more money he got better treatment? Did you have a full medical staff 50 feet away when you were hurt? I know I did not, neither did I have doctor right there who knew abot that type of treatment. Hell they had to life flight me out of the woods. The money this guy has-had has no bearing on his treatment. He was a lucky person to have all those people sitting right there where the rest of us did not.

This is true but all thoes medical staff members wouldnt be there if it wasnt a pro game. Even college has a big staff because players are valuable. Im glad he got the help because I wish this on no one. maby Im just a little jellous is all. sorry

#15 rjourney

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 04:30 PM

he got to be one of the luck ones. he is rich and famous. he had access to things "regular" people don't at this point in time. good for him, he is a very lucky man. but yeah, we can't help but feel a bit jelous, i guess. j's accident was in july so he watched all this unfold from his hospital bed at rehab and it was hard for him, really hard actually.

but you know, there is always someone who wishes they had what you have. things could always be worse.

#16 ParaforGod

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 06:13 PM

I don't care how he got it or where he was when he got it. Im just glad he has the chace to walk again.

#17 alyssa

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Posted 22 September 2007 - 01:27 AM


I just have to ask how you think because he had more money he got better treatment? Did you have a full medical staff 50 feet away when you were hurt? I know I did not, neither did I have doctor right there who knew abot that type of treatment. Hell they had to life flight me out of the woods. The money this guy has-had has no bearing on his treatment. He was a lucky person to have all those people sitting right there where the rest of us did not.

This is true but all thoes medical staff members wouldnt be there if it wasnt a pro game. Even college has a big staff because players are valuable. Im glad he got the help because I wish this on no one. maby Im just a little jellous is all. sorry


it's not evena jealousy matter for me. I'm glad that he gets this second chance. I'm just saying more money buys you more oppurtunities.

#18 Joed

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Posted 12 December 2007 - 02:52 PM

Saw a news segment about Everett this morning. He's walking independently now and doing quite well. It's encouraging to know that such significant recovery is possible...now to get that same kind of intervention to everyone.
* * * * * * * * *

Female. Incomplete para following a cord stroke in '03. Spina-bifida, severe scoliosis. 18 surgeries total...five spine-related: Three fusions w/hardware, two tethered cord releases.

#19 buffie

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 07:42 AM

I am glad that he is doing so well, but I am wondering if you can attribute that success to the treatment. There are several people that attained his level of progress that did not have access to that treatment. My roommate at Shepherds being one of those persons. Today she is walking independently, has bladder and bowels and doing great. The treatment is so new that how can we attribute his progress to it? He could just have been one of the lucky ones anyway?

#20 rjourney

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 07:31 PM

that's very true buffie, good point!

#21 Joed

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 10:52 PM

For those interested...Everett will be on Oprah, Sept 31.
* * * * * * * * *

Female. Incomplete para following a cord stroke in '03. Spina-bifida, severe scoliosis. 18 surgeries total...five spine-related: Three fusions w/hardware, two tethered cord releases.

#22 kewlcatkez

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 11:00 PM

For those interested...Everett will be on Oprah, Sept 31.



Well thats a loong while off yet. Is that so that he can have some (more) intense rehab first? or perhaps look into all the research so that he can answer the Qs fully? I just don;t understand why its September? Unless of cause Oprah is booked til then! :)


Take care,

K
Ex Nurse (med retired)
Connective tissue disorder & associated paralysis.

#23 Joed

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 11:01 PM

Ach! :) My apologies...it's Jan. 31st.
* * * * * * * * *

Female. Incomplete para following a cord stroke in '03. Spina-bifida, severe scoliosis. 18 surgeries total...five spine-related: Three fusions w/hardware, two tethered cord releases.

#24 Motor

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 05:15 AM

Ach! :specool: My apologies...it's Jan. 31st.

Just to mention it. A mounted police officer in SunRise Florida got thrown from his horse and came into the emergency room paralyzed from the neck down. Dr Green (the same one who was on the phone advising about the football player Everette) performed the same procedure on the cop. The cop walked out of hospital 10 weeks later. I actually had an appointment with Dr Green but was advised I was to far into my injury for proceedure. If you have the resources at your disposal and the money things get done that might not get usually done. I still see Dr Green and Dr Nash because they are from Jackson Memorial here in S Florida and are very big with the Miami Project where I am now involved in a few studies. Later for now guys. Be well and keep your heads up! It can only get better!
Peace! Oh yeah I watched the Giant vs Bills game on TV and they showed Everette walking into locker room. Had mixed emotions. Cried a little and felt some jealously. Not his fault though they have alot invested in him. Just glad he can walk again, but still jealous. The same proceedure should be available to all. Its getting popular here in S Florida where it started!
:H2kOther (26):

Edited by Motor, 27 January 2008 - 05:21 AM.

"CHEAP WOMAN AREN'T GOOD AND GOOD WOMAN AREN'T CHEAP"
"NEVER 4GET 9/11/01 THEY ARE GONE BUT NOT 4GOTTEN"
"I MUST CRAWL BEFORE I WALK (AGAIN)"
"LIVE EACH DAY LIKE ITS YOUR LAST"
"RIDE IT LIKE U STOLE IT"
Richie aka MOTOR :-)

#25 Joed

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 06:18 PM

I have to say, I was surprised by how well he walked onto Oprah's stage. Not even a discernable limp...he seemed strong. His hands haven't progressed as much as his legs, but he's making great strides there too.
* * * * * * * * *

Female. Incomplete para following a cord stroke in '03. Spina-bifida, severe scoliosis. 18 surgeries total...five spine-related: Three fusions w/hardware, two tethered cord releases.


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