Jump to content


Welcome to the Apparelyzed Spinal Cord Injury and Cauda Equina Syndrome Support Forum


Sign In  Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter

Create Account
Welcome to Apparelyzed, an active and vibrant spinal cord injury and cauda equina syndrome support forum. Like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of our spinal cord injury support community by signing in or creating an account.
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members.
  • Talk to others in real time in the Chat Room
We look forward to welcoming you to our community and reading your contributions and questions.
 
Simon
Forum Administrator.
 

Photo
- - - - -

Lifting A Person




  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Willing2help

Willing2help

    New Member

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • Spinal Injury Level:Neighbor

Posted 17 October 2007 - 11:30 AM

Hello all,

I was called to help lift a friend who is a paraplegic off of the floor and into her scooter without assistance. I didn't know how to do it as I have no training and her kid was too young to help. It took several attempts because she was heavy and the chair was fairly high.

There was no impersonal way to hold her as I lifted and I was a little embarrassed. From behind her, I placed my arms under hers and grabbed one wrist with my hand and lifted as high as I could go. I felt like I touched her inappropriately.

Is there a way to lift a women in a more professional way? This has happened before and other neighbors assisted. They all said it was difficult. If I'm called upoon again, I want to be able to do it correctly and in a way we both keep our dignity. Is this possible?

#2 Apparelyzed

Apparelyzed

    The Boss!

  • **Admin
  • 4,736 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:UK
  • Spinal Injury Level:C5/6 Anterior Cord
  • Injury Date:02-01-1992

Posted 17 October 2007 - 11:51 AM

Hi,

If your neighbour is falling with increased frequency, it may be worth suggesting she gets a mobile hoist.

This would be a much safer way of lifting her.

She could then ask if a few people would mind being on a call list if required.

The people using the hoist would need to be shown how to use it in a correct manner, so as not to injure the disabled person, or themselves.

Lifting someone off the floor, especially someone overweight, can very easily lead to a back injury of the assisting lifters.

Hope this helps.

Simon.

Posted Image   Posted Image
Follow the Apparelyzed Forum on our Facebook and Twitter feeds.


#3 Willing2help

Willing2help

    New Member

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • Spinal Injury Level:Neighbor

Posted 17 October 2007 - 12:03 PM

That does help. Can you steer me to a website that sells them? I think I will show it to her. I agree, the potential for injury to either of us is significant.

#4 Apparelyzed

Apparelyzed

    The Boss!

  • **Admin
  • 4,736 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:UK
  • Spinal Injury Level:C5/6 Anterior Cord
  • Injury Date:02-01-1992

Posted 17 October 2007 - 12:23 PM

There are quite a few hoist manufacturers about, which one you choose will depend to some degree on where you live.

The following may help when choosing a hoist.

Factors to consider when choosing a mobile hoist

The home environment


Space: is there enough space to manoeuvre the hoist into the correct position? This may be particularly relevant when the planned location for use includes bathrooms or toilets.

Furniture: will a hoist base go around or under items such as beds, chairs, baths etc? Will the lifting height of the hoist be sufficient to lift you clear of all surfaces? If you have a pressure relief mattress on top of your existing mattress some hoists may not provide sufficient lifting height to clear the mattress.

Floor surfaces: are these suitable to move a mobile hoist across? Thick pile carpets and door thresholds can impede manoeuvres.

Storage: is there enough space to store the hoist? Some hoists will dismantle or fold-up for storage or transportation.


If the above factors cause repeated difficulties that cannot be overcome it maybe worth considering using an overhead track hoist, which runs on a straight or curved ceiling fixed track.

Your needs

Type of disability: is your particular disability likely to remain stable for the foreseeable future, or is it likely to improve or deteriorate?

Size: check that the hoist capacity and the size of the sling is suitable for your size and weight.

Activities: will the hoist be used for purely home use, or will it be needed for getting in and out of the car, or for taking on holidays?

Independence: do you need to move from one place to another independently? If so an overhead track hoist will be necessary.


Your carer

Physical strength: consider the size and strength of your carer. It requires quite a lot of effort to turn and move a mobile hoist. Remember that hoists are designed as transferring not transporting aids - if you need to be carried over a distance, it is advisable to use an overhead track hoist or specifically designed wheeled equipment (e.g. wheelchairs or sanitary chairs).

Ability to adapt: if your carer has moved you in the same way for many years, it may take time and training to learn to use new equipment or new techniques?


Posted Image   Posted Image
Follow the Apparelyzed Forum on our Facebook and Twitter feeds.


#5 Willing2help

Willing2help

    New Member

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • Spinal Injury Level:Neighbor

Posted 17 October 2007 - 12:34 PM

When I use Google, I keep coming up with wheel chair and stair lifts. I'll try hoist.

#6 Willing2help

Willing2help

    New Member

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • Spinal Injury Level:Neighbor

Posted 17 October 2007 - 12:43 PM

I found what we need. Thanks for the tips and direction.

#7 NurseVic

NurseVic

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Country:UK
  • Spinal Injury Level:None/Nurse

Posted 17 October 2007 - 04:17 PM

I would definitely have her look into a hoist. There is never a time where you should be lifting another adult on your own, you could seriously injure yourself. If it happens again and you're on your own, call paramedics. They are trained in manual handling techniques.

I've sometimes gone to visit patients and they have been slumped on the floor and the partner or whoever has been waiting for me to turn up for the routine visit, thinking I'll lift them up! People will sometimes get a bit arsey when I refuse and get them to call an ambulance, but I value my back enough to never ever attempt to lift someone on my own.

What you could also do, is learn some basic manual handling techniques. If you're in the UK then you're local District Nurses should be able to do this. We often teach carers and relatives how to move people safely. I would really avoid lifting her on your own again though, it isn't appropriate for you to be expected to do it.

#8 ParaforGod

ParaforGod

    Intermediate Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 307 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Country:GA
  • Spinal Injury Level:T4 Complete

Posted 17 October 2007 - 08:19 PM

I don't know if you live in the US but I have a electric hoist and medicare paid for it so you might want to check into it.

#9 wheeliebear75

wheeliebear75

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,865 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Country:San Diego California
  • Spinal Injury Level:L2 incomplete ASIA-D
  • Injury Date:04-28-1990

Posted 18 October 2007 - 09:53 PM

How I get off the floor often is to get a stool that is between the hight of my chair and the floor then lift from floor to stool to chair. If she didn't get enough rehab she may not know that self help trick. Many of the same companies that make wheelchairs and standing frames also make lifts.
*Enjoy every sunset, but be grateful for every dawn.*
*Wheelchairs are made of a special ocular magnetic alloy......they're "eyeball magnets".*
*I USE a wheelchair, that does NOT make ME a wheelchair!*

#10 Spud

Spud

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:Alabama, USA
  • Spinal Injury Level:C5 C6 some C2

Posted 02 April 2008 - 01:42 AM

I use a Hoyer lift. (Not sure about the spelling) it looks like a cherry picker . if you know what that is. If you get one , make sure that the sling that you sit in has straps that can cross between your legs. I learned that lesson the hard way.

Edited by Spud, 02 April 2008 - 01:43 AM.

Complete quad
White male 25
Alabama, USA


Spinal Cord Injury & Cauda Equina Syndrome Support

This website is a way for those with spinal cord injuries and cauda equina syndrome to share experiences and advice. Any medical matters, treatments or alternative therapies discussed on this website should be thoroughly reviewed by a medical professional or therapist before being acted upon. Under no circumstances should you alter prescribed medication or a medical care plan without consulting your doctor or care plan supervisor first.