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The Best Location To Live For The Disabled




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28 replies to this topic

#1 Swordfish

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 08:05 PM

I've recently decided I need to 'start over' completely from scratch. I don't want to see the people I knew from 'before' and there's many more reasons, but basically the just of it is I want to start over! and the world is my oyster, I'll go anywhere. So that's what I need help with!

What is the best location for the disabled? accessibility-wise, rehab-wise, financial assistance-wise, and all around-wise.

I live in Canada (Ontario) and it's pretty good, but I'd like to go anywhere OTHER than ontario. ANYWHERE.

so far I'm thinking about Vancouver, BC. They are (I hear) very accessible. The GF STRONG rehab centre is suppose to be one of the best in Canada, and Vancouver is very beautiful from what I've seen (pics) Is anyone here from there?

Anywho, go ahead folks! list away, and if I choose your destination to live, then I'll send you a picture of me giving the thumbs up in acknowledgement.

#2 sexyfunkyboy

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 08:23 PM

Hey Swordfish,

I think it sounds like such a great idea what your doing ! Why not come to Glasgow which is in Bonnie Scotland. there are lots of places with disabled access and the rehab clinic is excellent. well atleast the physio side of it is. Im not that fussed with the doctors.

Anyhows the best of luck with your adventure. Keep us updated where you end up !

#3 kdenon01

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Posted 06 August 2008 - 08:57 PM

My husband and I did the same thing one year after his accident. We lived in Michigan our whole lives, he got his SCI, and a year later we packed up and moved down to Houston, Texas where we didn't know anybody! It was fantastic! We needed the break sooo bad. BUT, now we are moving back. I miss my Mom :)

But I can really tell you that we have no regrets about leaving, and we really needed that time for ourselves. GO FOR IT! and good luck!!!

#4 jass1

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 06:58 AM

Scandinavian countries a coaccordinga study

#5 Ches

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 11:41 AM

Im in Dallas, its plenty accessible. But too freakin hot. I hate the summers..this is only my second in a chair and Im miserable. Dont know how Texaswheelz and others have made it around here this long.

Don't recommend it, at least not in the summers!
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#6 russ1

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 01:15 PM

I'm guessing you probably have temperature regulation issues at your level - I know I do. Hot weather can be pretty hard to take but your body will adjust and it will get easier to cope with hot weather, I can now really notice the difference in my ability to cope in hot weather between two years post and now 5 years post. Still have to say I'm glad I don't live anywhere too hot though.
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#7 KarenFerguson

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 04:17 PM

Why not move to wonderful California! I personally wouldn't want to live anywhere else. Where we live (Los Osos, across the bay from Morro Bay and west of San Luis Obispo) it's basically in the mid 60's to mid 70's all year round - most of the time it's nice and overcast and beautiful. Accessibility wise, CA is (in my opinion) quite accessible. I also lived in San Diego for a bit and my husband got great therapy there - through Project Walk and Awakenings. Also Sharp hospital has great resources and physical therapy as well. They also have a quad rugby team (which hubby played on) and many other wheelchair spots teams. The climate is always great (although the summers can be a bit hot) and accessibility wise, I think it's one of the most wheelchair friendly places. Also, with the housing market the way it is, the time to buy is now! :mfrlol:

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#8 C Herod

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 09:10 PM

I have also heard great things about project walk in California. They seem to be true believer there that anything is possible. My husband i would love to go there but with kids i hate to give them another change in there life so soon after my husbands accident.

#9 Swordfish

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 10:18 PM

Thanks for the replies all! Keep em comin' -- I'm getting a lot of good research going here :thread jacked:

Oh, and Cherod, I know what you mean, but if u and ur husband will be happier/more comfortable there, that happiness will show to your kids, and hopefully they'll be able to deal with things too. Cause y'know they're just a part of your husbands injuryas u or he. unless they are young'ins lol, I was assuming.

#10 Texaswheelz

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 01:26 AM

Im in Dallas, its plenty accessible. But too freakin hot. I hate the summers..this is only my second in a chair and Im miserable. Dont know how Texaswheelz and others have made it around here this long.

Don't recommend it, at least not in the summers!

Poolside drinking is how I handle it. Yea Dallas is accessible and has lots to do in town and out and around the outskirts. Best day to deal with the heat is to just get out in it, the more your in it the least it bothers you. I spent last weekend outside all day long, Friday at 6 flags and Saturday at a FC Dallas soccer game. I think it hit 105 those days, but since I've been going out and rolling up hills in this heat, spending the day casually rolling around wasn't near as bad as it would have been had I stayed indoors all summer.

#11 KimAndSophie

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 02:33 AM

I've recently decided I need to 'start over' completely from scratch. I don't want to see the people I knew from 'before' and there's many more reasons, but basically the just of it is I want to start over! and the world is my oyster, I'll go anywhere. So that's what I need help with!

What is the best location for the disabled? accessibility-wise, rehab-wise, financial assistance-wise, and all around-wise.

I live in Canada (Ontario) and it's pretty good, but I'd like to go anywhere OTHER than ontario. ANYWHERE.

so far I'm thinking about Vancouver, BC. They are (I hear) very accessible. The GF STRONG rehab centre is suppose to be one of the best in Canada, and Vancouver is very beautiful from what I've seen (pics) Is anyone here from there?

Anywho, go ahead folks! list away, and if I choose your destination to live, then I'll send you a picture of me giving the thumbs up in acknowledgement.


Hi,

I'm also living in ON right now. I'm in Toronto and it's been pretty good so far. Since being a quad I've lived in Halifax, Newfoundland, Atlanta and now Toronto. Newfoundland just plain sucks as far as accessibility is concerned, Halifax was pretty good if you could find an accessible apt. and figured out the right bus routes (although some of the accessible buses had driver that didn't want to take the extra 2 minutes to let you on!). Toronto is pretty good, as long as you don't have to rely on public transportation. Atlanta was a bit better, but it seemed like every sidewalk leaned toward the street!

When I was in rehab (in NS) I was told by an OT there that a lot of people move to BC when they are injured. Mostly because of the weather in winter, but also because it's pretty accessible. I was considering moving there myself, but it would have been too far away for my boyfriend who works in the UK half of the time.

Hope the move goes well! :thread jacked:

#12 sits2much

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 05:37 AM

HA I read all the replies for this and wanted to put in my two cents.... Don't and I mean DON'T move to Utah, they are way behind and offer little in the way of support stuff for paraplegics... I moved here from Maryland and (if you can afford the cost of living) there are a lot of support groups, activities, and health care facilities... I only moved back to be closer to family for my partner and well I don't like it out here in Utah...

#13 FROG

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 05:22 PM

I am with Karenferguson. California near the coast is about a good as it gets for wheelchair riders. Weather is perfect and people are nice to us. Also for the most part very wheelchair friendly accomodations. By the way Karen, my wife is in SLO this week in seminars for special ed reading curriculum. She is enjoying your town.
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#14 maladjusted

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 03:03 AM

Canary Wharf in London wins with ease! Ive lived in Vancouver, North Calafornia, LA, NY, Sydney, Melboure, Bankock, Wellington all whilst being in a chair.

Everywere in Canary Wharf is flat - there are lifts everywere, and new developments arise it gets better and better.

All of the apartments are accesible, which also meens you can access your new friends homes. A huge selection of homes are a 5 miniuts push from Canary Wharfs central hub.

Accesible Tube (jubilee line) free travel
Docklands light railway (all stops acceble) free travel
River bus (all stops accesible) free travel
Cut price black taxi cabs (taxi card)
probley the best mall in the uk (all accesible)

All the new bars resturants etc... (all accesible)

Cinema, venues and the 02 arena (The dome)

Masive amount of employment all the major banks, finance, news headquaters

The 2012 para olympics

And you can take the Jubilee line tube from Canary Wharf underground station to Stanmore underground station. Stanmore has a very good Spinal Unit.

Best of all the fantastic attitude of the locals and local busines owners toward disability (if you ask for help they will fall over to help you)

Edited by maladjusted, 09 August 2008 - 09:26 PM.


#15 Boggs52

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 06:06 AM

Sure, where you are is bad....but even worse was North Pole Alaska for me. In 92 I moved to Sitka Alaska and Juneau in 2000. Both were okay as it rarely snowed and the temp seldom got below freezing. Now I live in Kingman Arizona. Warm year round, cheap housing, no big hills, and only 28 miles to Laughlin casinos. I could be in a much worse place for certain.

#16 MDK

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 12:39 PM

Chiang Mai ,Thailand for us!
I'd reccommend it any time !
www.dhcchiangmai.com

#17 dom

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 04:45 PM

Canary Wharf in London wins with ease! Ive lived in Vancouver, North Calafornia, LA, NY, Sydney, Melboure, Bankock, Wellington all whilst being in a chair.

Everywere in Canary Wharf is flat - there are lifts everywere, and new developments arise it gets better and better.

All of the apartments are accesible, which also meens you can access your new friends homes. A huge selection of homes are a 5 miniuts push from Canary Wharfs central hub.

Accesible Tube (jubilee line) free travel
Docklands light railway (all stops acceble) free travel
River bus (all stops accesible) free travel
Cut price black taxi cabs (taxi card)
probley the best mall in the uk (all accesible)

All the new bars resturants etc... (all accesible)

Cinema, venues and the 02 arena (The dome)

Masive amount of employment all the major banks, finance, news headquaters

The 2012 para olympics

And you can take the Jubilee line tube from Canary Wharf underground station to Stanmore underground station. Stanmore has a very good Spinal Unit.

Best of all the fantastic attitude of the locals and local busines owners toward disability (if you ask for help they will fall over to help you)

yes fantastic place

#18 Tetracyclone

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 05:43 PM

I'm confused. People are recommending countries other than Canada, but I believe a Canadian citizen will get no financial benefits from a US govt or State agency for rehabilitation, nor housing allowance, no social services. Fergit it.

Same in UK?

Are any of your Ontario benefits transferable? You guys are talking like we are all independently wealthy.

#19 Trinity

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 05:50 PM

Benefits are not transferable into the uk as far as I know but as far as being independently wealthy, some people have a sizable settlement to live off in which case the world is their oyster.

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#20 Tetracyclone

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 09:51 PM

Benefits are not transferable into the uk as far as I know but as far as being independently wealthy, some people have a sizable settlement to live off in which case the world is their oyster.



Well, I got two cases of water peaches from the guy who hit me, but i ate them all before I left the first hospital.

Edited by Pwuff, 20 December 2009 - 09:52 PM.


#21 *Jeff V*

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 05:37 PM

I am in Southern Ontario, weather is o.k. six months of the year - and miserable the other six. Did a lot of travelling through the states and they are years ahead of us in accessibility. Ontario is working on it with a goal of 2025....but 15 years is a long time to wait.

Ideally, I'd love to live in Central Florida....even six months here, six months there to keep the benefits...Yes, it is hot in the summer...but it is still a damn site better than frigid, icy and SNOW in the winter.

I understand completely starting over and leaving every one behind....funny tho, after an accident it doesn't take much effort as those around you seem to disappear on their own... Family unfortunately is the worst... and then there are those who say I am so LUCKY that I don't have to work anymore....this was one "lottery" I did not buy a ticket for!!

LUCKY ??????? -- effin' a$$holes! :)

Edited by Jeff V, 22 December 2009 - 05:38 PM.


#22 *Jeff V*

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 06:26 PM

I'm confused. People are recommending countries other than Canada, but I believe a Canadian citizen will get no financial benefits from a US govt or State agency for rehabilitation, nor housing allowance, no social services. Fergit it.

Same in UK?

Are any of your Ontario benefits transferable? You guys are talking like we are all independently wealthy.




CPP Disability and WSIB benefits will go with you if your in the Serious Injury Program
(100% PD or 60% NEL post-1998 injury WSI Act - I have no idea about pre-1998 WCB Act but the info should be on the WSIB.on.ca site)
and your deemed never to work (PD) However, this is still subject to individual adjudication . If you have had your 72 month LOE lock-in, cheques will follow you (in C$) until your 65
(and then any WSIB retirement benefit you have accumulated will follow you as well)
If you have PCA allowances that will follow you as well as any ILA for life. (unless deemed to work in future).
If your pre-72 month lock-in; the WSIB will pay out your claim after they determine your life span and benefit entitlement in one nice big cheque, and after another Independent Examination (IE) assessment is completed.... they will pay Ontario equivs for medical and your responsible for the difference...
All this info is at wsib.on.ca

IMO.. (you'd be better off to wait post 72 months, that big cheque will most likely be less than you deserve and you have your whole life ahead of you!) Home Modifications are NOT transferrable.

One ER trip in Orlando at a non-profit hospital (Florida Hospital @ Celebration, Fl) for stomach illness cost us last August over $3,000 US for 1.5 hours in the hospital.. I highly doubt Ontario Gov't Hospitals would have billed the WSIB a quarter of that!

IMO - The benefits of a warmer climate (less pain as frigid, damp weather seems to intensify it) are very appealing, however, if your dependent on the medical system and pharmaceuticals - a few months could literally bankrupt you! WSIB will pay Canadian Equiv for prescriptions however meds in the US are outrageous! For example, one pill prescribed in the US for Nausea was $16/per PILL, the same script in Canada was $.16 (yes, 16 cents!)

As for Section 8 housing, or even FEMA in a disaster (i.e. Hurricane/Tornado/Flooding) assistance is NOT available to non-US citizens, whether you've been there 1 day or 20 years. Green Card status does not entitle you to benefits, you must have a Green Card AND Citizenship and if you use any public services in the first five years, you or your sponsor are responsible for repayment to the feds!

Personally, I am praying for a North American Union like the EU! - I think a lot of disabled people would be packing and moving south!

I have been researching this for two years now, and have spoken with immigration lawyers on this. I would however be VERY interested to hear if I am wrong or misinformed...because if I am, watch for a U-haul blazing down I-75 towards Central Florida. :)

#23 Tetracyclone

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 10:45 PM

Jeff- that is the kind of research I like to see. Could you pick me up on the way south?
Seriously, We plan to move the day my mate retires.

Edited by Pwuff, 22 December 2009 - 10:46 PM.


#24 sciiaf

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 11:00 PM

I'm not sure I can provide much useful insight in response to your question but I wanted to reach out to you because I read your post and it was like reading what's been running over and over in my mind since injured (june 2009). A start over, do over or as I've been told to 'reinvent' myself. I spent the first 38 yrs of my life defining who I am, on my own and like you, I feel like I have to start all over from scratch again, except, with a very limited tool box. I understand completely your frame of thought, it's not out of anger, depression, anxiety or anything but I too feel like, since I am restarting my life again, I don't see where pre-injury friends, hobbies, habits, loves fit in. Only family has a secure place.

As far as the best location for the disabled, I am wondering too as I'd like to rebuild my life in completely new surroundings. I was thinking of Vancouver BC, as it would be close to family yet far away from those who used to know the past me. My advice would be to check out the state (or in case of Canada, the province's) department of rehabilitation services and the adult and family services department. I assume they would have concrete information about accessibility, living, services and occupational/job resources.

Have you thought about moving to the States?

#25 *Jeff V*

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 12:41 AM

Jeff- that is the kind of research I like to see. Could you pick me up on the way south?
Seriously, We plan to move the day my mate retires.



How bout a convoy!!!!

#26 sciiaf

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 01:07 AM

"I understand completely starting over and leaving every one behind....funny tho, after an accident it doesn't take much effort as those around you seem to disappear on their own... Family unfortunately is the worst... and then there are those who say I am so LUCKY that I don't have to work anymore....this was one "lottery" I did not buy a ticket for!!"

Idea just came to my head, we should all ban together and write a book titled 'What not to say to a para/quad'. Just a guidebook on the rudest, most ignorant things people can say. I know that really they're trying to be supportive but when I read your post about not having to work again the equivalent of winning the lottery...it's mean. It was bad enough I got laid off from my job a year prior to my accident. I would do anyting to work again 1.) get me out of the house 2.) I can't stand watching reruns of 'Everybody Loves Raymond 3) to rebuild my savings, checking, 401K all of which took a hit when I got injured 4) I'm tired of wearing sweats.

Anyways, thought I'd say I hear you on that comment. Maybe ask them if they'd like to trade places with you for the day

#27 *Jeff V*

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 01:26 AM

I'm not sure I can provide much useful insight in response to your question but I wanted to reach out to you because I read your post and it was like reading what's been running over and over in my mind since injured (june 2009). A start over, do over or as I've been told to 'reinvent' myself. I spent the first 38 yrs of my life defining who I am, on my own and like you, I feel like I have to start all over from scratch again, except, with a very limited tool box. I understand completely your frame of thought, it's not out of anger, depression, anxiety or anything but I too feel like, since I am restarting my life again, I don't see where pre-injury friends, hobbies, habits, loves fit in. Only family has a secure place.

As far as the best location for the disabled, I am wondering too as I'd like to rebuild my life in completely new surroundings. I was thinking of Vancouver BC, as it would be close to family yet far away from those who used to know the past me. My advice would be to check out the state (or in case of Canada, the province's) department of rehabilitation services and the adult and family services department. I assume they would have concrete information about accessibility, living, services and occupational/job resources.

Have you thought about moving to the States?


You pretty much need to pinpoint exactly where you want to live in Canada as social services (as we call them here in the socialist country) are provided by the municipality (city or (corporation in Ohio)) you live in.

Only once you have an idea where you'd like to move, can you actually call the local municipality and see what services might be available to you. Social services are not administrated or supplied by the province (with the exception of provincial health care) and most municipalities have a resident requirement of one year before you can obtain services in it.

Provincial Health Insurance usually has a 3-6 month waiting period (depending on what province you relocate to) before you qualify for benefits again. Unfortunately, Canada, nor the provinces, have a department of rehabilitation services. Rehab services are provided in larger centres by individual hospitals or Health Sciences Centres.

You actually need to start with a GP (Family Doctor) and be referred to a physiatrist, and accepted into a Rehab Centre Program. There is a long waiting list and insurance companies and WCB get priority placement over government health insurance (as it pays more to the hospital corporation).

In most municipalities one of the biggest hurdles is getting a GP to take you on as a patient - and in most municipalities there is a severe doctor shortage throughout the country, without a GP your pretty much excluded from other health services... unless of course you end up in an ER or UCC and get referred as an urgent case.

Not every municipality have the programs you might be looking for. For example, if your looking for a pain management program in Ontario, you'd be going to Toronto, burn recovery, usually Hamilton, and so on.

If you are in Ontario, and you have a GP and you are in a rehab program, it would NOT be wise to relocate to another province as you must go through a waiting period to have health services again (or social services) and if your lucky enough to get a GP, and referred to a physiatrist, you start at the end of the line again, behind compensation and insurance cases. You could in effect wait a couple of years before services are available to you. Contrary to popular belief, Canada does not have "National Health Care" like the UK, it is provincial, (like a state) and each province has different rules, regulations and fees. And again, social services are administered by the individual municipality, Your case is NEVER transferrable.

The system is not perfect, although once your in a program, the benefits are good. Rehab programs however are funded by the provincial government and are time-limited, meaning if you do not recover within the "prescribed" time, the hospital is no longer funded for your benefits and your on your own again. (Usually 9 months).

There are a fair number of Canadians with their own resources who do not wish to wait for the process and end up funding their own recovery at places like DRC Spinal Cord Unit in Detroit, or Project Walk in California, or the Spinal Centre at the University of Florida.


"I understand completely starting over and leaving every one behind....funny tho, after an accident it doesn't take much effort as those around you seem to disappear on their own... Family unfortunately is the worst... and then there are those who say I am so LUCKY that I don't have to work anymore....this was one "lottery" I did not buy a ticket for!!"

Idea just came to my head, we should all ban together and write a book titled 'What not to say to a para/quad'. Just a guidebook on the rudest, most ignorant things people can say. I know that really they're trying to be supportive but when I read your post about not having to work again the equivalent of winning the lottery...it's mean. It was bad enough I got laid off from my job a year prior to my accident. I would do anyting to work again 1.) get me out of the house 2.) I can't stand watching reruns of 'Everybody Loves Raymond 3) to rebuild my savings, checking, 401K all of which took a hit when I got injured 4) I'm tired of wearing sweats.

Anyways, thought I'd say I hear you on that comment. Maybe ask them if they'd like to trade places with you for the day



Good God, I thought I was the only one broke, housebound in sweats, watching reruns of ELR!

BTW, here's a good one for you!! "Oh! I know what you going through, I broke my ankle once and was in a wheelchair for a week!!" :lalala:

#28 Apparelyzed

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 10:42 AM

This is a test post and will be deleted.

There is no need to report this post to the Moderators.

Regards

Simon

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#29 qbounce

qbounce

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 05:16 PM

Okay, so it's been quite a while since this post was started, and my curiosity always gets the better of me:

Where oh where has our little Swordfish gone
Oh where oh where can he be?

I'm guessing Chang Mai, Thailand is out of the question . . . . . I've been there and it's waaaaaaay to hot and humid. Plus, to many dirt roads and, not that I recall, but I'm possitive they don't have any curb cut outs.
When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained. - Mark Twain


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