Jump to content


Welcome to the Apparelyzed Spinal Cord Injury and Cauda Equina Syndrome Support Forum


Sign In  Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter

Create Account
Welcome to Apparelyzed, an active and vibrant spinal cord injury and cauda equina syndrome support forum. Like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of our spinal cord injury support community by signing in or creating an account.
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members.
  • Talk to others in real time in the Chat Room
We look forward to welcoming you to our community and reading your contributions and questions.
 
Simon
Forum Administrator.
 

Photo
- - - - -

Advice On Chances Of Recovery




  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Jackie555

Jackie555

    New Member

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • Spinal Injury Level:Broken at T2/T3-friend

Posted 18 September 2008 - 12:03 PM

I have a friend who 3weeks ago had a serious mountain bike accident & suffered a broken back at T2/T3. The spinal cord is not severed, but he immediately went numb from the nipple line down. He had an operation 2days later to repair the damage in the back & has so far been told he can expect anything from 10%-90% chance of recovery. He still has no feeling below the nipple line. Can anyone offer any thoughts whatsoever whether there is any chance of getting feeling back & what length of time do we have to wait before we have to accept none will return.

#2 Kwag_Myers

Kwag_Myers

    Intermediate Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,207 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:South-East Michigan
  • Spinal Injury Level:T12 Incomplete/CES
  • Injury Date:11-08-2007

Posted 18 September 2008 - 02:49 PM

Hi Jackie, and welcome to the forum. Sorry to hear about your friend.

It takes about six-to-eight weeks for the swelling to go down in the spinal cord. For me, that period of time was when I had most of my sensory and motor function return. I've had some since then, but very little. There are others here with similar injuries that have had steady progress up to one year. Spinal Cord Injuries are as unique as we are - you just have to wait and see (hope for the best and plan for the worst).

I'm one year post injury and my neurosurgeon doesn't expect I'll improve any more. Of course, he also told me I'd never walk again and is amazed that I can.
'Cause that's how I roll! Posted Image

#3 Manda

Manda

    Intermediate Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 368 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Country:PA
  • Spinal Injury Level:c5 incomplete

Posted 18 September 2008 - 03:42 PM

The important thing is not having damage to the spinal cord,I broke my back a month before I broke my neck,(you think I would've learned the first time.)It hurt and I had to wear a brace,But I could walk Now the Dr at Hershey Med Center,in Pa told me,when I broke my neck that if my spinal cord would'nt have been damaged,It would been a long recovery but I would've probaly walked again

#4 eleanorigby

eleanorigby

    Intermediate Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 150 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Country:Chandler, AZ
  • Spinal Injury Level:c6/c7 Incomplete

Posted 18 September 2008 - 05:11 PM

I think SCI's are the only injuries they would give you statistics lie that for. 10% to 90% chance of recovery. So what are you realy trying to say doc, that you have no clue?

Sorry to hear about your friend and as vague as those stats seem, they're prob right, you never know with a SCI. My spinal cord wasn't severed either, it wasn't even nicked; it was bruised and I'm still in a chair after many years, but I've seen people with worse injuries than mne recover a great deal.
Insert witty, intelligent and deep quote here.

#5 Jackie555

Jackie555

    New Member

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • Spinal Injury Level:Broken at T2/T3-friend

Posted 18 September 2008 - 05:46 PM

Thanks for the replies..It does appear to be in the lap of the Gods. Hearing about experiences like 'kwag_myers' helps. The enormity & the consequences of what has happened keep washing over me in waves, goodness knows how he's feeling. But I shall just keep hoping for the best. Once again thanks.

#6 qbounce

qbounce

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,339 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:So.Calif, USA
  • Spinal Injury Level:C7 Complete (so I'm told)

Posted 18 September 2008 - 10:17 PM

Fortunately attitude plays a large part in the recovery process too.
If he stays depressed in bed there's a good chance his recovery will be arduous and slow, but with the right attitude it definately makes a difference as to how much more quickly things progress.
When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained. - Mark Twain

#7 alpentalic

alpentalic

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 12 posts
  • Country:Seattle, WA
  • Spinal Injury Level:C5/6 incomplete 7/14/06

Posted 19 September 2008 - 12:44 AM

Fortunately attitude plays a large part in the recovery process too.
If he stays depressed in bed there's a good chance his recovery will be arduous and slow, but with the right attitude it definately makes a difference as to how much more quickly things progress.


Agree to that.

Your friend needs to make recovery his job and lifetime habit. I'd be looking for an exercise-based recovery center, a good nutritionist, home gym equipment, trainers, etc etc etc. Hospital rehab is not enough and, depending which program your at, a supplement at best.

I don't know of anyone who has recovered 100% of their former ability. It's probably as hard to read and accept that as it is to have to write it. I do, however, know people who have made profound recovery's none-the-less. Every little strength he gets back makes life that much easier. I've worked my way up to walking very short distances and standing with a walker, a far cry from my better days. That alone is saving measurable wear and tear on my shoulders as I age and to me - worth the 1000's of hours of input it's taken to get here

Encourage him to log on and take a part in online SCI communities and forums like this one, there's a wealth of collective information to take in.

good luck -

#8 Unbreakable

Unbreakable

    Intermediate Member

  • Banned
  • PipPip
  • 777 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:Pensacola, Florida, USA
  • Spinal Injury Level:Admin Note: Forum Troll

Posted 19 September 2008 - 01:50 AM

Fortunately attitude plays a large part in the recovery process too.


Laughter is the best medicine. No, that's not just a stupid Reader's Digest section. It's true. If you don't laugh, you'll cry. Life is a big joke.
Build a man a fire and he'll be warm for a night. Set a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

#9 ChrisLV

ChrisLV

    New Member

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • Spinal Injury Level:T2-T4

Posted 12 October 2008 - 10:15 PM

I have a friend who 3weeks ago had a serious mountain bike accident & suffered a broken back at T2/T3. The spinal cord is not severed, but he immediately went numb from the nipple line down. He had an operation 2days later to repair the damage in the back & has so far been told he can expect anything from 10%-90% chance of recovery. He still has no feeling below the nipple line. Can anyone offer any thoughts whatsoever whether there is any chance of getting feeling back & what length of time do we have to wait before we have to accept none will return.


I had a T2-T3 hematoma of unknown cause detected in March 2006. The neurologist advised that it would go away by itself. Instead, I gradually began to lose function until I found myself paralyzed with no motor or sensory function on May 23rd of that year. Emergency surgery to remove the clot was followed by 2 months in rehab. I got back sensory function and some motor function during those 2 months during which I had intense physio and occupational therapy. I was released on a wheel chair at the end of July 2006. I continued with intense physiotherapy from July to December but improvement was slow. An MRI at the end of December 2006 showed that a "tethering" of the spinal cord which meant that the cord had attached itself to the neural canal with scar tissue. I underwent a second surgery in Feb 2007 to remove the tethering. I resumed intense physio and over the rest of 2007 and until the present time, slowly graduated from the wheel chair to a walker and then to crutches. I now (Oct 2008) walk with one crutch with a brace on my right foot to alleviate foot drop. I am still not normal as spasticty inhibits movement and my balance is unsteady without support. I exercise at least 3 hours a day - stretches, trainer and treadmill. I walk an average of 3 miles a day and have walked a total of 500 miles in 2008 alone. I find treadmill walking has been of great help. My doctor says that healing in the cord is a very slow process that can take up to 5 years. As some of the posts so far have indicated, every case is unique and your friend has to work hard and keep a positive attitude. There are good days and bad days. My bladder and bowel control is now much better and I am venturing out with friends. The spasticity is the worst feeling especially in the groin and abdomen. It is as if there is a python coiled around you. Nevertheless, keep the faith and don't believe anyone who says your friend will not walk again - it is up to him to disprove them. Bottom line recovery takes anywhere from 1-5 years with most of it coming in the first 18 months if it does. Otherwise chances are slim but not out of the question.

#10 Grumpy

Grumpy

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 12 posts
  • Country:Central Arkansas
  • Spinal Injury Level:C8/T1 Incomplete

Posted 20 October 2008 - 01:01 AM

I had a motorcycle wreck in Sept of last year. Broke my neck C8/T1 incomplete. Paralyzed from the nipples down. I had no feeling from the nipples down, either. Came home on Dec 7 last year. Today, I have some kind of sensation in most of my lower body, I can move the toes on my right foot, have gotten a lot stronger and can now tell when I need to go to the bathroom. Don't have any control, but I can tell. My spinal cord wasn't severed, just swollen. It can take a year for the swelling to start going down. Your mileage may vary. Tell your friend that the attitude that he decides to take will mean a lot towards his recovery. You always have good days and bad days, but overall outlook plays a huge part in it. After he gets out of the hospital he needs to continue physical therapy to keep sending signals to his legs. You can help by being there when he needs you, but by also making him learn to do stuff for himself. It's a balancing act, but it will help make him stronger. Hope this helps.

#11 pjcstoke

pjcstoke

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 65 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:Cambridge
  • Spinal Injury Level:T6 compete

Posted 05 November 2008 - 12:35 PM

Have a look at

Standing Start in the UK http://www.standings....org/index.html

or

Project walk in the US http://www.projectwalk.org/

Might eb able to help

Peter :P
hope believe achieve
through Standing Start - the leading rehab programme for SCI in the UK


Spinal Cord Injury & Cauda Equina Syndrome Support

This website is a way for those with spinal cord injuries and cauda equina syndrome to share experiences and advice. Any medical matters, treatments or alternative therapies discussed on this website should be thoroughly reviewed by a medical professional or therapist before being acted upon. Under no circumstances should you alter prescribed medication or a medical care plan without consulting your doctor or care plan supervisor first.