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Need Gift Ideas For 10 Year Old Quadriplegic Girl




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12 replies to this topic

#1 *Lisa*

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Posted 06 December 2005 - 04:37 PM

Hi. I have a friend whose 10 year old daughter is quadriplegic. She does not really go out anywhere and stays lying down most of the time. She watches TV, but I have not seen her show a great deal of interest in music. She doesn't know how to read. I have just recently met this family and would like to know what type of gift would be good for the daughter. Her mental capacity is about that of a 4 year old. I was thinking maybe something hanging from the ceiling or lights with sounds would be good for her, but I honestly have no idea. Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks!

#2 Joed

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Posted 06 December 2005 - 07:11 PM

Hi Lisa...

I can think of a few things that might interest her, but not really knowing much about her capabilities, I'm hesitant to say. I would suggest talking with her therapists? They would probably have a host of ideas that would not only interest her within her capabilities, but would encourage therapeutic movement, etc.

Since she spends a lot of time watching TV, I initially thought of some good movies, tapes...but that hardly challenges her to move around more. Would she be able to work a hand-held game?

LeapPad is a great system that encourages reading and interaction. They make a level for pre-school, pre-reading ages too. My son loved his at that age (four).

Edited by Joed, 06 December 2005 - 07:12 PM.

* * * * * * * * *

Female. Incomplete para following a cord stroke in '03. Spina-bifida, severe scoliosis. 18 surgeries total...five spine-related: Three fusions w/hardware, two tethered cord releases.

#3 wheelie182

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Posted 06 December 2005 - 10:58 PM

How about a lava lamp or one of the tubes with the flowing bubbles that lights up in different colours, where i work we sell some disco equipment and im a sucker for those sort of effects,

im suggesting these sort of things because i know that they can be theraputic (ahh spelling?)
That's what she said!

#4 AHolland

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Posted 07 December 2005 - 12:33 AM

I think it is true that you need to get a grasp on her capabilities. I guess being a father that I would like to see you get something that gets her away from TV and onto doing some activity even if it is something like playdoh, etcha sketch (not sure if that is spelled right. It's not going to be easy as you are going to have to understand her mental capabilities and physical abilities. Are you able to get some idea of her abilities and then get back to us?
T4/T5

#5 hillarymcarter

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Posted 07 December 2005 - 02:27 AM

What about some fun card games? Memory, etc...
This would help her hand movements also..give her a chance to use her brain.
Those new story reader books are also really great. My nephew has one of those. You get different books to put in it and you have a little pen that you follow the words with and it reads to you.

#6 Jilly

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Posted 09 December 2005 - 07:36 PM

Hi Lisa
I have worked with special needs children for years. Any toy for a pre schooler would be good for her. Things that she can touch with different textures are good, If she doesnt get around very much try toys like balls, that she can squeeze, roll, drop, throw. Things that have lights and sounds, sparkley pretty girly things, wind up toys, theres heaps of things out there. Play dough and finger paints are great too for developing her hand movements ( but can get VERY messy) ...... I'll think more on this one... Good on you for thinking of her needs, These kids are LOTS of fun, especially when you get to know her capabilities a bit more. It can be tricky, you have to treat her like a four year old without forgetting that shes actually ten. ....Have fun!

#7 Joed

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Posted 09 December 2005 - 07:57 PM

Play dough and finger paints are great too for developing her hand movements ( but can get VERY messy)


Just wanted to add to Jilly's comment (great suggestion, btw)....they do make a special Play-Doh for the younger kids...it's not as messy/sticky and is very easy to clean up. I think it must be more water-based than the regular Play-Doh.
* * * * * * * * *

Female. Incomplete para following a cord stroke in '03. Spina-bifida, severe scoliosis. 18 surgeries total...five spine-related: Three fusions w/hardware, two tethered cord releases.

#8 *Ann*

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 01:02 AM

I was searching for ideas for my niece who is a quadriplegic and noticed a lot of the gift ideas were for those who could use their hands. My niece has no use of her body below her neck. She has DVD's and music (not at all interested in books on tapes). Any ideas. She is 17.

#9 sarah o

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 10:06 PM

How about some Rose essential oil? It lifts my spirits every single time i put it on. It could be put on the clothing, rubbed on the skin with some nice oil or put on a pillow or blanket.

Or, for something pretty to hang form the ceiling , which is also healing, click on my picture and you can see an example...

Happy shopping! B)
the only thing to worry about .. is worry

#10 *onion*

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 02:48 AM

Hi Lisa,

I agree with everyone else. It's hard to tell from your description which of her limbs are most affected. Everyone here is down playing TV. But there are some great fun, learning, uplifting things out there for kids. "Dora the explorer a” besides being fun, teaches a second language. And you can go to Dora's computer site and join in. There are many things like this. And oh yeah, you can most certainly buy something, CD, DVD, pocket books, clothes, and so on, on, on. There is also "Blues Clues", "Baby Einstein" "Thomas the Train" One last thought, there is something called Build a Bear. The idea is to take a child and watch while his/her bear becomes the one meant for them. You (the child) picks out the body, watches it get stuffed, puts a heart, and a brain in, and then dresses the bear. I'm sure if you contacted them, they’d find a way to let the little girl create her own bear. (This really is not that expensive until you get into the clothes and accessories.) Ohhhhh those accessories.

Edited by onion, 10 March 2006 - 02:58 AM.


#11 linda2

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 11:21 PM

Hi. I have a friend whose 10 year old daughter is quadriplegic. She does not really go out anywhere and stays lying down most of the time. She watches TV, but I have not seen her show a great deal of interest in music. She doesn't know how to read. I have just recently met this family and would like to know what type of gift would be good for the daughter. Her mental capacity is about that of a 4 year old. I was thinking maybe something hanging from the ceiling or lights with sounds would be good for her, but I honestly have no idea. Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks!

my two daughters love their nails painted saying than my son does as well.why not pay to get them done.
bubble blowing machine
a fish
a day trip out
a trampoline she could lie on it like my son does
tape fairy storys for her so she can here a reasuring voice.

#12 juls

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 06:19 AM

What about the glow in the dark stickers of stars and moons, althought it is not the same thing, my brother in law was killed when my niece and nephew were young and they had trouble sleeping..after we put these up they would spend ages just staring up at the stickers..they thought they were amazing and it took thier minds off things, even if it was only just for a little while. Maybe she might enjoy somrthing like this? :cheers:

#13 agamache

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 08:14 PM

Recently I found something really cool for my nieces room. It's even better than those glow in the dark stars and planets, but also for your ceiling. They are ceiling tiles that make different scenes and pictures like clouds or a tropical island and they are very colorful! This is where I bought them. :cheers: http://www.colonialm...p...at=0&page=1


Spinal Cord Injury & Cauda Equina Syndrome Support

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