Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Bmi Ibw Charts For Sci




  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Apparelyzed

Apparelyzed

    The Boss!

  • **Admin
  • 4,704 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:UK
  • Spinal Injury Level:C5/6 Anterior Cord
  • Injury Date:02-01-1992

Posted 06 October 2004 - 06:16 PM

I was just wondering if anyone knows of a Body Mass Index or Ideal Body Weight chart for people with Spinal Cord Injuries?

As the muscles atrophy, the muscle tissue becomes replaced with fat over time, and therefor although an SCI person may look healthy, their body composition means they hold more fat than an able bodied person of the same weight.

Any information or charts would be great.

Simon :)

Posted Image   Posted Image
Follow the Apparelyzed Forum on our Facebook and Twitter feeds.


#2 kanga2433

kanga2433

    Intermediate Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 336 posts
  • Country:Fife, Scotland

Posted 30 October 2004 - 10:31 AM

There's an article in this weeks New Scientist onthe more general problem in society at large. Apparently even children are showing reduced muscle bulk and increased fat. Seems to be due to sitting in front of computers and TV's and not running and walking about.

Of course for us, as you have pointed this is rather more difficult. I can't be the only opne who can't get out of breath going uphill to the supermarket. I haven't tried the idea of an exercise machine at home but I doubt I could get that motivated to use one.

Anyway, sorry I can't help on the real question.
Robert
T6 (Transverse Myelitis))

#3 Apparelyzed

Apparelyzed

    The Boss!

  • **Admin
  • 4,704 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:UK
  • Spinal Injury Level:C5/6 Anterior Cord
  • Injury Date:02-01-1992

Posted 31 October 2004 - 01:54 PM

Thought about this post a little more the other day.

Even though someone with a spinal cord injury may have a higher fat content in their body compostition than an abled bodied person, how detremental would that extra fat be to their health and quality of life long term?:)

You have to weigh up the facts that if they didn't have a few extra pounds of fat to cover their bones, they may be suseptable to pressure sores, and long term this could increase the risk of infection and Sepsis. :D

Given the choice, I think I'd rather weigh a couple of extra pounds and be pressure sore free, rather than lean, fat free and prone to pressure sores.:P

It's all about quality of life at the end of the day, and not how long you are here for. Something which I feel some doctors sometimes overlook.

Simon.

Posted Image   Posted Image
Follow the Apparelyzed Forum on our Facebook and Twitter feeds.


#4 kanga2433

kanga2433

    Intermediate Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 336 posts
  • Country:Fife, Scotland

Posted 31 October 2004 - 10:03 PM

Yes, I agree with you there, Simon, but only as long as it is a few pounds. There seem to be some on the SIA forum who have put on weight big time and that's not good because it is about making everything we do harder. I don't know what lifting of yourself you can do, but as a para I do all my own in and out opf wheelchair and any extra weight just puts more strain on the arms and shoulders and I suspect, when pushing the chair too.

I suppose it's a matter of degree, but whilst I don't deliberately diet do try to eat with an eye to weight.
Robert
T6 (Transverse Myelitis))

#5 Apparelyzed

Apparelyzed

    The Boss!

  • **Admin
  • 4,704 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Country:UK
  • Spinal Injury Level:C5/6 Anterior Cord
  • Injury Date:02-01-1992

Posted 01 November 2004 - 04:00 PM

Further to my earlier posting, I have now found an Ideal Body Weight chart relating to SCI which you can now see here:

http://www.apparelyzed.com/bmi.html

Regards

Simon.

Posted Image   Posted Image
Follow the Apparelyzed Forum on our Facebook and Twitter feeds.




This website is a way for those with spinal cord injuries to share experiences and advice. Any medical matters, treatments or alternative therapies discussed on this website should be thoroughly reviewed by a medical professional or therapist before being acted upon. Under no circumstances should you alter prescribed medication or a medical care plan without consulting your doctor or care plan supervisor first.